12 Results for:

Spain & Portugal

  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 12 of 12
  1. 8.6 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    From the Pulitzer Prize–winning and bestselling author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb comes the remarkable story of the Spanish Civil War through the eyes of the reporters, writers, artists, doctors, and nurses who witnessed it. The Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) inspired and haunted an extraordinary number of exceptional artists and writers, including Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, Martha Gellhorn, Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, and John Dos Passos. The idealism of the cause—defending democracy from fascism at a time when Europe was darkening toward another world war—and the brutality of the conflict drew from them some of their best work, including Guernica, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Homage to Catalonia, and The Spanish Earth. The war spurred breakthroughs in military and medical technology as well. New aircraft, new weapons, new tactics, and new strategies all emerged in the intense Spanish conflict. Indiscriminate destruction raining from the sky became a dreaded reality for the first time. Progress also arose from the horror: the doctors and nurses who volunteered to serve with the Spanish defenders devised major advances in battlefield surgery and front-line blood transfusion. In those ways, and in many others, the Spanish Civil War served as a test bed for World War II, and for the entire twentieth century. From the life of John James Audubon to the invention of the atomic bomb, readers have long relied on Richard Rhodes to explain, distill, and dramatize crucial moments in history. Now he takes us into battlefields and bomb shelters, into the studios of artists, into the crowded wards of war hospitals, and into the hearts and minds of a rich cast of characters to show how the ideological, aesthetic, and technological developments that emerged in Spain changed the world forever.

    Available Formats: Download

    Hell and Good Company

    8.6 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  2. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    10.7 hrs • 3/1/2013 • Unabridged

    Following in the footsteps of the greatest Spanish adventurers, Michael Wood retraces the path of the conquistadors from Amazonia to Lake Titicaca, and from the deserts of North Mexico to the heights of Machu Picchu. As he travels the same routes as Hernán Cortés, Francisco, and Gonzalo Pizarro, Wood describes the dramatic events that accompanied the epic sixteenth-century Spanish conquest of the Aztec and Inca empires. He also follows parts of Orellana’s extraordinary voyage of discovery down the Amazon and of Cabeza de Vaca’s arduous journey across America to the Pacific. Few stories in history match these conquests for sheer drama, endurance, and distances covered, and Wood’s gripping narrative brings them fully to life. Wood reconstructs both sides of the conquest, drawing from sources such as Bernal Diaz’s eyewitness account, Cortés’s own letters, and the Aztec texts recorded not long after the fall of Mexico. Wood’s evocative story of his own journey makes a compelling connection with the sixteenth-century world as he relates the present-day customs, rituals, and oral traditions of the people he meets. He offers powerful descriptions of the rivers, mountains, and ruins he encounters on his trip, comparing what he has seen and experienced with the historical record. As well as being one of the pivotal events in history, the Spanish conquest of the Americas was one of the most cruel and devastating. Wood grapples with the moral legacy of the European invasion and with the implications of an episode in history that swept away civilizations, religions, and ways of life. The stories in Conquistadors are not only of conquest, heroism, and greed but of changes in the way we see the world, history and civilization, justice and human rights.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, Digital Rental
    Conquistadors by Michael Wood

    Conquistadors

    10.7 hrs • 3/1/13 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
    Also: CD, Digital Rental
  3. 9.4 hrs • 2/1/2012 • Unabridged

    The first major biography of the Borgias in thirty years, Christopher Hibbert’s latest history brings to life the family and the world they lived in: the glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissance. The name Borgia is synonymous with the corruption, nepotism, and greed that were rife in Renaissance Italy. The powerful, voracious Rodrigo Borgia, better known to history as Pope Alexander VI, was the central figure of the dynasty. Two of his seven papal offspring also rose to power and fame—his daughter Lucrezia and her brother Cesare, who murdered Lucrezia’s husband and served as the model for Machiavelli’s The Prince. The Borgias were notorious for seizing power, wealth, land, and titles through bribery, marriage, and murder. The story of the family’s dramatic rise from its Spanish roots to the highest position in Italian society is an absorbing tale.

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental
    Download
    Also: Digital Rental
  4. 8.5 hrs • 11/1/2011 • Unabridged

    Throughout the Second World War, Lisbon was at the very center of the world’s attention and was the only European city in which both the Allies and the Axis powers openly operated. Portugal was frantically trying to hold on to its self-proclaimed wartime neutrality but in reality was increasingly caught in the middle of the economic, and naval, wars between the Allies and the Nazis. The story is not, however, a conventional tale of World War II in that barely a shot was fired or a bomb dropped. Instead, it is a gripping tale of intrigue, betrayal, opportunism, and double-dealing, all of which took place in the Cidade da Luz and along its idyllic Atlantic coastline. It is the story of how a relatively poor European country not only survived the war physically intact but came out of it in 1945 much wealthier than it had been when war broke out in 1939. Although much of this wealth was considered by the Allies to be “ill-gotten gain,” the Portuguese were allowed to retain the vast majority of it. Lisbon was a city in which an apparent German plot in 1940 to kidnap the Duke and Duchess of Windsor was foiled and one in which much of the royalty of Europe lived and played in either temporary or permanent exile. Over one million refugees flooded into the city seeking passage to the United States on one of the ships that sailed from the neutral port or, for the super-rich, via the Azores on the Pan-American Boeing B314 Clipper service. Most, however, had to wait months or even years in the city before securing their onward passage. Among the refugees were prominent Jews such as the writer Arthur Koestler, the artists Marc Chagall and Max Ernst, and art collector Peggy Guggenheim. On the run from the Germans since the fall of France in the summer of 1940, many of the refugees survived on a clandestine network of financial and organizational support originating from the offices of Solomon Guggenheim in New York. Hundreds of Allied and German agents operated openly in the city and monitored every move of the enemy. Their role was to log enemy shipping movements in and around the busy port of Lisbon, to spread propaganda, and to disrupt the supply of vital goods to the enemy. Among the agents was a young Ian Fleming busy devising Operation Golden Eye and playing blackjack against German agents at the Estoril Casino—a location that was to later provide the inspiration for a number of James Bond films. The two hundred or so British agents operating in Lisbon were controlled from London by the Iberian Desk of the Special Operations Executive, which was led by the brilliant spy chief, and traitor, Kim Philby. Writers Graham Greene and Malcolm Muggeridge worked at the same desk as Philby before Muggeridge was posted to Lisbon and eventually on to the Portuguese colonies. As the British and German agents watched each other, their movements were, in turn, shadowed and recorded by the hugely feared Portuguese secret police, the PVDE, led by the Berlin-educated and strong anti-Communist Captain Agostinho Lourenco. His reports and decisions drew the lines that determined which espionage and propaganda activities in the city were tolerable to the authorities and which were not. As a number of British, German, and Italian secret agents and journalists found to their cost, if you tried to cross Captain Lourenco, your stay in Portugal was severely shortened. Such was the reputation of the PVDE during the 1930s that it became the model used by the Nazis to develop the Gestapo. Lisbon was also the end of the line for escaped Allied POWs who arrived in the city to be flown back to England on the three-times-a-week BOAC-operated flights from Lisbon to Whitchurch, near Bristol. The passenger lists of the flights were a who’s who of the senior network of British spies in the city, as well as shadowy Allied industrialists involved in the trade war with the Germans. Documentary sources reveal that competition for seats on the planes was strong, with various British agencies fighting for the limited number available. Writing in 1944, Harry Pussy, BOAC operations officer in the city, described the daily scene at Lisbon’s airport as being like the movie Casablanca, but twenty-fold. In truth, Lisbon was the real Casablanca of the war, complete with refugees; British, German, Italian, and American spies; and the Portuguese secret police watching every move.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Lisbon by Neill Lochery

    Lisbon

    8.5 hrs • 11/1/11 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  5. 0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    8.4 hrs • 3/11/2009 • Unabridged

    In 1936, George Orwell went to Spain to report on the civil war and instead joined the POUM militia to fight against the Fascists. In this now justly famous account of his experience, he describes both the bleak and the comic aspects of trench warfare on the Aragon front, the Barcelona uprising in May 1937, his nearly fatal wounding just two weeks later, and his escape from Barcelona into France after the POUM was suppressed. As important as the story of the war itself is Orwell’s analysis of why the Communist Party sabotaged the workers’ revolution and branded the POUM as Trotskyist, which provides an essential key to understanding the outcome of the war and an ironic sidelight on international Communism. It was during this period in Spain that Orwell learned for himself the nature of totalitarianism in practice, an education that laid the groundwork for his great books Animal Farm and 1984.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

    Homage to Catalonia

    8.4 hrs • 3/11/09 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  6. 6.9 hrs • 4/21/2008 • Unabridged

    A riveting history of how the cataclysmic Lisbon earthquake shook the religious and intellectual foundations of Enlightenment Europe. Along with the volcanic destruction of Pompeii and the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the Lisbon quake of 1755 is one of the most destructive natural disasters ever recorded. After being jolted by a massive quake, Lisbon was then pounded by a succession of tidal waves and finally reduced to ash by a fire that raged for five straight days. In The Last Day, Nicholas Shrady provides not only a vivid account of this horrific disaster but also a stimulating survey of the many shock waves it sent throughout Western civilization. When news of the quake spread, it inspired both a lurid fascination in the popular imagination of Europe and an intellectual debate about the natural world and God’s place in human affairs. Voltaire, Alexander Pope, Immanuel Kant, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, among other eminent figures, took up the disaster as a sort of cause célèbre and a vehicle to express Enlightenment ideas. More practically, the Lisbon quake led to the first concerted effort at disaster control, modern urban planning, and the birth of seismology. The Last Day is popular history writing at its best and will appeal to readers of Simon Winchester’s Krakatoa and A Crack in the Edge of the World.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Last Day

    6.9 hrs • 4/21/08 • Unabridged
    Download
  7. 21.9 hrs • 9/17/2007 • Unabridged

    The epic story of the fall of the Inca Empire to Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro in the aftermath of a bloody civil war, and the recent discovery of the lost guerrilla capital of the Incas, Vilcabamba, by three American explorers. In 1532, the fifty-four-year-old Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro led a force of 167 men, including his four brothers, to the shores of Peru. Unbeknownst to the Spaniards, the Inca rulers of Peru had just fought a bloody civil war in which the emperor Atahualpa had defeated his brother Huascar. Pizarro and his men soon clashed with Atahualpa and a huge force of Inca warriors at the Battle of Cajamarca. Despite being outnumbered by more than two hundred to one, the Spaniards prevailed—due largely to their horses, their steel armor and swords, and their tactic of surprise. They captured and imprisoned Atahualpa. Although the Inca emperor paid an enormous ransom in gold, the Spaniards executed him anyway. The following year, the Spaniards seized the Inca capital of Cuzco, completing their conquest of the largest native empire the New World has ever known. Peru was now a Spanish colony, and the conquistadors were wealthy beyond their wildest dreams.  But the Incas did not submit willingly. A young Inca emperor, the brother of Atahualpa, soon led a massive rebellion against the Spaniards, inflicting heavy casualties and nearly wiping out the conquerors. Eventually, however, Pizarro and his men forced the emperor to abandon the Andes and flee to the Amazon. There, he established a hidden capital, called Vilcabamba—only recently rediscovered by a trio of colorful American explorers. Although the Incas fought a deadly, thirty-six-year-long guerrilla war, the Spanish ultimately captured the last Inca emperor and vanquished the native resistance.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Last Days of the Incas

    21.9 hrs • 9/17/07 • Unabridged
    Download
  8. 9.7 hrs • 1/2/2007 • Unabridged

    A fascinating look at the history and grandeur of bullfighting Death in the Afternoon is an impassioned look at bullfighting by one of its true aficionados. It reflects Hemingway's conviction that bullfighting was more than mere sport and reveals a rich source of inspiration for his art. The unrivaled drama of bullfighting, with its rigorous combination of athleticism and artistry, and its requisite display of grace under pressure, ignited Hemingway's imagination. Seen through his eyes, bullfighting becomes a richly choreographed ballet, with performers who range from awkward amateurs to masters of great elegance and cunning. Death in the Afternoon is also a deeper contemplation of the nature of cowardice and bravery, sport and tragedy, and is enlivened throughout by Hemingway's sharp commentary on life and literature.

    Available Formats: Download

    Death in the Afternoon

    9.7 hrs • 1/2/07 • Unabridged
    Download
  9. 2.6 hrs • 6/1/2006 • Unabridged

    The United States at War Series By the turn of the twentieth century, the United States had evolved from a colony into an international power. As a result of the Spanish-American War, America acquired colonies in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. She also acquired a taste for international politics. Then the First World War erupted. As it dragged on, Americans fiercely debated US involvement; the nation had a deep tradition of avoiding foreign wars. But the Spanish-American War had challenged this tradition, and the First World War would shatter it. The United States at War Series is a collection of presentations that review the political, economic, and social forces that have erupted in military conflict. They describe the historical context for each of the nine major US wars and examine how a military conflict resolved, or failed to resolve, the forces that caused the war.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, Digital Rental
    The Spanish-American War and World War I, Part 1 by Joseph Stromberg, Ralph Raico
    Download
    Also: CD, Digital Rental
  10. 6.0 hrs • 6/1/2005 • Abridged

    The epic, never-before-told story of Columbus’s final, and perhaps greatest, journey to the New World. The final voyage of Christopher Columbus was by far his most dangerous, unexpected, exhilarating, and consequential. It was, as Pulitzer Prize-winner Samuel Eliot Morison put it, “a story of adventure which imagination could hardly invent; a struggle between man and the elements, in which the most splendid manifestations of devotion, loyalty, and courage are mingled with the vilest human passions.” Shockingly, no book has been written about this fateful final journey until now. Martin Dugard finally brings to light this saga of shipwreck, mutiny, discovery, and political treachery, telling the story of how Columbus’s quest to find a passage to the Orient drove him onward in the face of peril. Here we meet Christopher Columbus, the determined and sometimes desperate elder adventurer, a far cry from the shrouded hero/villain of legend. The Last Voyage of Columbus offers up the long-lost last chapter in the life of a man whose story we only thought we knew.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Last Voyage of Columbus

    6.0 hrs • 6/1/05 • Abridged
    Download
  11. 8.7 hrs • 11/1/2004 • Unabridged

    Written in 1831, Washington Irving’s dreamlike description of the Alhambra, the beautiful Moorish castle that defined the height of Moorish civilization, and of the surrounding territory of Granada remains one of the most romantic and entertaining travelogues ever written of this region in Spain. Enhanced here with exquisite Spanish guitar music, the narrative is a heady mix of historical fact, medieval myth and mystery, sensual descriptions, and an appreciation for a civilization that valued beauty, philosophy, literature, science, and the arts on an equal level with warrior skills. Secret chambers, desperate battles, imprisoned princesses, palace ghosts, and fragrant gardens, described in a wistful and dreamlike eloquence, will transport listeners to a paradise of their own.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Tales of the Alhambra by Washington Irving

    Tales of the Alhambra

    Music: “Capricho Árabe” by Francisco Tarrega, played on classical guitar by Joseph Thompson
    Read by Ralph Cosham
    8.7 hrs • 11/1/04 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  12. 7.6 hrs • 5/16/2002 • Unabridged

    From the bestselling author of Beethoven’s Hair comes a stirring narrative account of the town that inspired one of the world’s most celebrated and controversial paintings, and of the artist whose passion and vision altered the course of modern history and art. In 1937, the Basque town of Guernica was bombed by Hitler’s Luftwaffe. This act of terror—the first large-scale attack against civilians in modern warfare—outraged the world, and one man in particular. Pablo Picasso responded to the devastation in his homeland by beginning work on “Guernica,” what many consider the greatest artwork of the twentieth century. Picasso’s War sheds light on the conflict that was an ominous prelude to WWII and delivers an unforgettable portrait of a genius whose visionary statement about horror and terrible wounds of war still resonates today.

    Available Formats: Download

    Picasso’s War

    7.6 hrs • 5/16/02 • Unabridged
    Download
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions