81 Results for:

Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)

  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 16 of 81
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. ...
  6. 6
  1. 7.0 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    An entertaining look at the life and wisdom of Alexander Hamilton, the Founding Father who mastered the arts of war, wealth, wit, and women, long before becoming the subject of the runaway Broadway hit Hamilton: An American Musical.    Two centuries after his death, Alexander Hamilton is shining once more under America's spotlight—and we need him now more than ever. Orphaned as a kid, this young, scrappy, and hungry self-starter came from nothing, and then helped win the Revolutionary War, create the country’s financial system, seduce New York's most eligible ladies, ratify the Constitution, and land his face on our $10 bill. (In his spare time he also formed the Coast Guard, the US Mint, and West Point.) He is the ultimate underdog, blending a renegade spirit with a much-needed dose of sunny American optimism. In Alexander Hamilton's Guide to Life, Jeff Wilser distills Hamilton's life and writings into lessons for anyone who wants a job, has a job, wants more money, is looking for love, or is preparing for a duel. Along the way, chapters ranging from "Self Improvement" and "Career Advancement" to "Money" and "Romance" reveal the ultimate dos (and don'ts) for sparking a revolution in your own life. Approachable, informative, and fun, this blend of advice, humor, and history will be the perfect gift for pop-culture and history lovers alike

    Available Formats: Download

    Alexander Hamilton's Guide to Life

    7.0 hrs • 9/20/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  2. 18.9 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the ideal framework for a democratic, prosperous nation. Alan Taylor, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history of the nation’s founding. Rising out of the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, Taylor’s Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain’s mainland colonies, fueled by local conditions, destructive, hard to quell. Conflict ignited on the frontier, where settlers clamored to push west into Indian lands against British restrictions, and in the seaboard cities, where commercial elites mobilized riots and boycotts to resist British tax policies. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. Brutal guerrilla violence flared all along the frontier from New York to the Carolinas, fed by internal divisions as well as the clash with Britain. Taylor skillfully draws France, Spain, and native powers into a comprehensive narrative of the war that delivers the major battles, generals, and common soldiers with insight and power. With discord smoldering in the fragile new nation through the 1780s, nationalist leaders such as James Madison and Alexander Hamilton sought to restrain unruly state democracies and consolidate power in a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of “We the People,” the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But their opponents prevailed in the presidency of Thomas Jefferson, whose vision of a western “empire of liberty” aligned with the long-standing, expansive ambitions of frontier settlers. White settlement and black slavery spread west, setting the stage for a civil war that nearly destroyed the union created by the founders.

    Available Formats: Download

    American Revolutions

    18.9 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  3. 12.5 hrs • 7/5/2016 • Unabridged

    An illuminating study of the intertwined lives of the founders of the American republic—John Adams, Aaron Burr, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington. During the 1790s, which Ellis calls the most decisive decade in our nation’s history, the greatest statesmen of their generation—and perhaps any—came together to define the new republic and direct its course for the coming centuries. Ellis focuses on six discrete moments that exemplify the most crucial issues facing the fragile new nation: Burr and Hamilton’s deadly duel, and what may have really happened; Hamilton, Jefferson, and Madison’s secret dinner, during which the seat of the permanent capital was determined in exchange for passage of Hamilton’s financial plan; Franklin’s petition to end the “peculiar institution” of slavery—his last public act—and Madison’s efforts to quash it; Washington’s precedent-setting Farewell Address, announcing his retirement from public office and offering his country some final advice; Adams’s difficult term as Washington’s successor and his alleged scheme to pass the presidency on to his son; and finally, Adams and Jefferson’s renewed correspondence at the end of their lives, in which they compared their different views of the Revolution and its legacy. In a lively and engaging narrative, Ellis recounts the sometimes collaborative, sometimes archly antagonistic interactions between these men, and shows us the private characters behind the public personas: Adams, the ever-combative iconoclast, whose closest political collaborator was his wife, Abigail; Burr, crafty, smooth, and one of the most despised public figures of his time; Hamilton, whose audacious manner and deep economic savvy masked his humble origins; Jefferson, renowned for his eloquence, but so reclusive and taciturn that he rarely spoke more than a few sentences in public; Madison, small, sickly, and paralyzingly shy, yet one of the most effective debaters of his generation; and the stiffly formal Washington, the ultimate realist, larger-than-life, and America’s only truly indispensable figure. Ellis argues that the checks and balances that permitted the infant American republic to endure were not primarily legal, constitutional, or institutional, but intensely personal, rooted in the dynamic interaction of leaders with quite different visions and values. Revisiting the old-fashioned idea that character matters, Founding Brothers informs our understanding of American politics—then and now—and gives us a new perspective on the unpredictable forces that shape history.

    Available Formats: Download

    Founding Brothers

    12.5 hrs • 7/5/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  4. 9.8 hrs • 5/24/2016 • Unabridged

    The must-have companion to Bill O’Reilly’s historical docudrama Legends and Lies: The Patriots, an exciting and eye-opening look at the Revolutionary War through the lives of its leaders The American Revolution was neither inevitable nor a unanimous cause. It pitted neighbors against each other, as loyalists and colonial rebels faced off for their lives and futures. These were the times that tried men’s souls: no one was on stable ground and few could be trusted. Through the fascinating tales of the first Americans, Legends and Lies: The Patriots reveals the contentious arguments that turned friends into foes and the country into a warzone. From the riots over a child’s murder that led to the Boston Massacre to the suspicious return of Ben Franklin, the “First American”; from the Continental Army’s first victory under George Washington’s leadership to the little known southern Guerilla campaign of “Swamp Fox” Francis Marion, and the celebration of America’s first Christmas, The Patriots recreates the amazing combination of resourcefulness, perseverance, strategy, and luck that led to this country’s creation. Told in the same fast-paced, immersive narrative as the first Legends and Lies, The Patriots is an irresistible, adventure-packed journey back into one of the most storied moments of our nation’s rich history.

    Available Formats: Download

    Bill O’Reilly’s Legends and Lies

    9.8 hrs • 5/24/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  5. 13.3 hrs • 5/10/2016 • Unabridged

    From the New York Times bestselling author of In The Heart of the Sea comes a surprising account of the middle years of the American Revolution, and the tragic relationship between George Washington and Benedict Arnold. In September 1776, the vulnerable Continental Army under an unsure George Washington (who had never commanded a large force in battle) evacuates New York after a devastating defeat by the British Army. Three weeks later, near the Canadian border, one of his favorite generals, Benedict Arnold, miraculously succeeds in postponing the British naval advance down Lake Champlain that might have ended the war. Four years later, as the book ends, Washington has vanquished his demons and Arnold has fled to the enemy after a foiled attempt to surrender the American fortress at West Point to the British. After four years of war, America is forced to realize that the real threat to its liberties might not come from without but from within. Valiant Ambition is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. The focus is on loyalty and personal integrity, evoking a Shakespearean tragedy that unfolds in the key relationship of Washington and Arnold, who is an impulsive but sympathetic hero whose misfortunes at the hands of self-serving politicians fatally destroy his faith in the legitimacy of the rebellion. As a country wary of tyrants suddenly must figure out how it should be led, Washington’s unmatched ability to rise above the petty politics of his time enables him to win the war that really matters.

    Available Formats: CD, Download

    Valiant Ambition

    13.3 hrs • 5/10/16 • Unabridged
    CD
    Also: Download
  6. 7.7 hrs • 4/18/2016 • Unabridged

    Between 1819 and 1845, as veterans of the Revolutionary War were filing applications to receive pensions for their service, the government was surprised to learn that many of the soldiers were not men but boys, many of whom were under the age of sixteen and some even as young as nine. In Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution, Caroline Cox reconstructs the lives and stories of this young subset of early American soldiers, focusing on how these boys came to join the army and what they actually did in service. Giving us a rich and unique glimpse into colonial childhood, Cox traces the evolution of youth in American culture in the late eighteenth century, as the accepted age for children to participate meaningfully in society—not only in the military—was rising dramatically. Drawing creatively on sources such as diaries, letters, and memoirs, Caroline Cox offers a vivid account of what life was like for these boys both on and off the battlefield, telling the story of a generation of soldiers caught between old and new notions of boyhood.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution by Caroline Cox

    Boy Soldiers of the American Revolution

    Foreword by Robert Middlekauff
    Read by Traber Burns
    7.7 hrs • 4/18/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  7. 15.7 hrs • 4/5/2016 • Unabridged

    An intimate portrait of Louisa Catherine Adams, the wife of John Quincy Adams, who witnessed firsthand the greatest transformations of her time Born in London to an American father and a British mother on the eve of the Revolutionary War, Louisa Catherine Johnson was raised in circumstances very different from the New England upbringing of the future president John Quincy Adams, whose life had been dedicated to public service from the earliest age. And yet John Quincy fell in love with her, almost despite himself. Their often tempestuous but deeply close marriage lasted half a century. They lived in Prussia, Massachusetts, Washington, Russia, and England, at royal courts, on farms, in cities, and in the White House. Louisa saw more of Europe and America than nearly any other woman of her time. But wherever she lived, she was always pressing her nose against the glass, not quite sure whether she was looking in or out. The other members of the Adams family could take their identity for granted—they were Adamses; they were Americans—but she had to invent her own. The story of Louisa Catherine Adams is one of a woman who forged a sense of self. As the country her husband led found its place in the world, she found a voice. That voice resonates still. In this deeply felt biography, the talented journalist and historian Louisa Thomas finally gives Louisa Catherine Adams’s full extraordinary life its due. An intimate portrait of a remarkable woman, a complicated marriage, and a pivotal historical moment, Louisa Thomas’s biography is a masterful work from an elegant storyteller.

    Available Formats: Download

    Louisa

    15.7 hrs • 4/5/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  8. 13.5 hrs • 3/1/2016 • Unabridged

    In August 1776, a little over a month after the Continental Congress had formally declared independence from Britain, the revolution was on the verge of a sudden and disastrous end. General George Washington found his troops outmanned and outmaneuvered at the Battle of Brooklyn, and it looked like there was no escape. But thanks to a series of desperate rear guard attacks by a single heroic regiment, famously known as the “Immortal 400,” Washington was able to evacuate his men, and the nascent Continental Army lived to fight another day. Today, only a modest, rusted, and scarred metal sign near a dilapidated auto garage marks the mass grave where the bodies of the “Maryland Heroes” lie—256 men “who fell in the Battle of Brooklyn.” In Washington’s Immortals, bestselling military historian Patrick K. O’Donnell brings to life the forgotten story of this remarkable band of brothers. Known as “gentlemen of honor, family, and fortune,” they fought not just in Brooklyn but also in key battles, including Trenton, Princeton, Camden, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and Yorktown, where their heroism changed the course of the war. Drawing on extensive original sources, from letters to diaries to pension applications, O’Donnell pieces together the stories of these brave men—their friendships, loves, defeats, and triumphs. He explores their arms and tactics, their struggles with hostile loyalists and shortages of clothing and food, their development into an elite unit, and their dogged opponents, including British general Lord Cornwallis. And through the prism of this one group, O’Donnell tells the larger story of the Revolutionary War. Washington’s Immortals is gripping and inspiring boots-on-the-ground history, sure to appeal to a wide audience.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Washington’s Immortals by Patrick K. O’Donnell

    Washington’s Immortals

    13.5 hrs • 3/1/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  9. 9.0 hrs • 1/15/2016 • Unabridged

    A fascinating new angle on presidential history, assessing the performances of all forty-four presidents in their freshman year of the toughest job in the world Grouped by the issues the new presidents confronted in their first year in office, The President’s First Year takes listeners into the history, thought processes, and results on a case-by-case basis, including how the presidents’ subsequent actions prove that they learned—or didn’t learn—from their mistakes. From George Washington to Barack Obama, The President’s First Year details the challenging first twelve months of all our presidents’ tenures.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    The President’s First Year by Douglas Alan Cohn

    The President’s First Year

    9.0 hrs • 1/15/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  10. 8.2 hrs • 5/19/2015 • Unabridged

    In The Jefferson Rule, historian David Sehat describes how liberals, conservatives, secessionists, unionists, civil rights leaders, radicals, and libertarians have sought out the Founding Fathers to defend their policies. Beginning with the debate between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton over the future of the nation, and continuing through the Civil War, the New Deal, the Reagan Revolution, and Obama and the Tea Party, many pols have asked, “What would the Founders do?” instead of “What is the common good today?” Recently both the Right and the Left have used the Founders to sort through such issues as voting rights, campaign finance, free speech, gun control, taxes, and war and peace. They have used an outdated context to make sense of contemporary concerns. This oversimplification obscures our real issues. From Jefferson to this very day we have looked to the eighteenth century to solve our problems, even though the Fathers themselves were a querulous and divided group who rarely agreed. Coming to terms with the past, Sehat suggests, would be the start of a productive debate. And in this account, which is by turns informative, colorful, and witty, he shows us why.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Jefferson Rule

    8.2 hrs • 5/19/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  11. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    8.4 hrs • 5/12/2015 • Unabridged

    The prizewinning author of Founding Brothers and American Sphinx now gives us the brilliantly told unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their individual autonomy. The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men responsible—some familiar, such as George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison, and some less so, such as Robert Morris and Governeur Morris. It was these men who shaped the contours of American history by diagnosing the systemic dysfunctions created by the Articles of Confederation, manipulating the political process to force a calling of the Constitutional Convention, conspiring to set the agenda in Philadelphia, orchestrating the debate in the state ratifying conventions, and, finally, drafting the Bill of Rights to assure state compliance with the constitutional settlement.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Quartet

    8.4 hrs • 5/12/15 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
  12. 5.0 hrs • 5/5/2015 • Unabridged

    The real story of how the Bill of Rights came to be: a concise, vivid history of political strategy, big egos, and partisan interest that set the terms of the ongoing contest between the federal government and the states. Revered today for articulating America’s founding principles, the first ten amendments—the Bill of Rights—was in fact a political stratagem executed by James Madison to preserve the Constitution, the Federal government, and the latter’s authority over the states. In the skilled hands of award-winning historian Carol Berkin, the story of the Founders’ fight over the Bill of Rights comes alive in a gripping drama of partisan politics, acrimonious debate, and manipulated procedure. From this familiar story of a Congress at loggerheads, an important truth emerges. In 1789, the young nation faced a great ideological divide around a question still unanswered today: should broad power and authority reside in the federal government or should it reside in state governments? The Bill of Rights, from protecting religious freedom and the people’s right to bear arms to reserving unenumerated rights to the states, was a political ploy first, and matter of principle second. How and why Madison came to devise this plan, the divisive debates it fostered in the Congress, and its ultimate success in defeating antifederalist counterplans to severely restrict the powers of the federal government is more engrossing than any of the myths that shroud our national beginnings. The debate over the founding fathers’ original intent still continues through myriad Supreme Court decisions. By pulling back the curtain on the political, short-sighted, and self-interested intentions of the founding fathers in passing the Bill of Rights, Berkin reveals the inherent weakness in these arguments and what it means for our country today.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Bill of Rights

    5.0 hrs • 5/5/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  13. 18.6 hrs • 3/17/2015 • Unabridged

    History enthusiasts and admirers of Team of Rivals will rejoice in this magisterial account of the extraordinary Americans who served the nation’s first chief executive: together they created the presidency for a country disgusted by crowns and the people who would wear them. In 1789, as George Washington became the first president of the United States, the world was all but certain that the American experiment in liberty and representative government would founder. More than a few Americans feared that the world was right. In Washington’s Circle, we see how Washington and his trusted advisers, close friends, and devoted family defied the doomsayers to lay the foundation for an enduring constitutional republic. This is a fresh look at an aloof man whose service in the Revolutionary War had already earned him the acclaim of fellow citizens. Washington was easy to revere if difficult to know. David S. Heidler and Jeanne T. Heidler reveal Washington’s character through his relationship with his inner circle, showing how this unlikely group created the office of the presidency. Here is a story of cooperation, confrontation, triumph, and disappointment, as the president, congress, and the courts sorted out the limits of executive power, quarreled over funding the government, coped with domestic strife, and faced a world at war while trying to keep their country at peace. Even more, it is a story of remarkable people striving for extraordinary achievements. Many of these characters are familiar as historic icons, but in these pages they act and speak as living individuals: the often irked and frequently irksome John Adams in the vice presidency; the mercurial Alexander Hamilton, leading the treasury department; the brilliant, deceptively cunning Thomas Jefferson as secretary of state; James Madison, who was Washington’s advocate—and his eyes and ears—in congress; and Washington’s old friend and former brother-in-arms Henry Knox, at the administration’s beleaguered war department. Their stories mingle with those of Edmund Randolph, John Jay, Gouverneur Morris, and the others who stood with a self-educated Virginia farmer to forge the presidency into an institution protective of its privileges but respectful of congressional prerogatives. Written with energy, wit, and an eye for vivid detail, Washington’s Circle is the fascinating account of the people who met the most formidable challenges of the government’s earliest hours with pluck, ability, and enviable resourcefulness. When the world said they would fail, they rolled up their sleeves. This is their story.

    Available Formats: Download

    Washington’s Circle

    18.6 hrs • 3/17/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  14. 13.8 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    A vivid, insightful, essential new account of the formative years that shaped a callow George Washington into an extraordinary leader George Washington was famously unknowable, but Robert Middlekauff penetrates the mystique to reveal the fears, values, and passions that drove him. Rich in psychological details regarding Washington’s temperament, idiosyncrasies, and experiences, this book shows us a self-conscious Washington who grew in confidence and experience as a young soldier, businessman, and Virginian gentleman and was transformed into an American patriot by the revolutionary ferment of the 1760s and ’70s. Taking command of an army constantly in dire need—without adequate food, weapons, and even clothing and shoes, right up until the end—Washington displayed incredible persistence and resourcefulness and evolved into a leader who understood perhaps better than anyone the crucial role the army had to play in the formation of a new American society. Washington was at the heart not just of the revolution’s course and outcome but also the success of the nation that it produced. This is an essential book for understanding the character of one of America’s great figures.

    Available Formats: Download

    Washington's Revolution

    13.8 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  15. 10.9 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    Band of Giants brings to life the founders who fought for our independence in the Revolutionary War. Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin are known to all, but men like Morgan, Greene, and Wayne are less familiar. Yet the dreams of the politicians and theorists only became real because fighting men were willing to take on the grim, risky, brutal work of war. The soldiers of the American Revolution were a diverse lot: merchants and mechanics, farmers and fishermen, paragons and drunkards. Most were ardent amateurs. Even George Washington, assigned to take over the army around Boston in 1775, consulted books on military tactics. In Band of Giants, Jack Kelly vividly captures the fraught condition of the war—the bitterly divided populace, the lack of supplies, the repeated setbacks on the battlefield, and the appalling physical hardships. That these inexperienced warriors could take on and defeat the superpower of the day was one of the remarkable feats in world history.

    Available Formats: Download

    Band of Giants

    10.9 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  16. 11.1 hrs • 10/7/2014 • Unabridged

    Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Edward J. Larson recovers a crucially important—yet almost always overlooked—chapter of George Washington’s life, revealing how Washington saved the United States by coming out of retirement to lead the Constitutional Convention and serve as our first president. After leading the Continental Army to victory in the Revolutionary War, George Washington shocked the world: he retired. In December 1783, General Washington, the most powerful man in the country, stepped down as Commander in Chief and returned to private life at Mount Vernon. And yet as Washington contentedly grew his estate, the fledgling American experiment floundered. Under the Articles of Confederation, the weak central government was unable to raise revenue to pay its debts or reach a consensus on national policy. The states bickered and grew apart. When a Constitutional Convention was established to address these problems, its chances of success were slim. Jefferson, Madison, and the other Founding Fathers realized only one man could unite the fractious states: George Washington. Reluctant but duty-bound, Washington rode to Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 to preside over the Convention. Although Washington is often overlooked in most accounts of the period, this masterful new history from Pulitzer Prize winner Edward J. Larson brilliantly uncovers Washington’s vital role in shaping the Convention—and shows how it was only with Washington’s support and his willingness to serve as president that the states were brought together to ratify the Constitution, thereby saving the country.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    The Return of George Washington

    11.1 hrs • 10/7/14 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions