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Computer Industry

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  1. 5.0 hrs • 10/11/2016 • Unabridged
    Available Formats: Download


    5.0 hrs • 10/11/16 • Unabridged
  2. 12.6 hrs • 10/1/2016 • Unabridged

    A freewheeling, sharp-shooting indictment of a tech-besotted culture. With a razor wit, Nicholas Carr cuts through Silicon Valley's unsettlingly cheery vision of the technological future to ask a hard question: Have we been seduced by a lie? Gathering a decade's worth of posts from his blog, Rough Type, as well as his seminal essays, Utopia Is Creepy offers an alternative history of the digital age, chronicling its roller-coaster crazes and crashes, its blind triumphs, and its unintended consequences. Carr's favorite targets are those zealots who believe so fervently in computers and data that they abandon common sense. Cheap digital tools do not make us all the next Fellini or Dylan. Social networks, diverting as they may be, are not vehicles for self-enlightenment. And "likes" and retweets are not going to elevate political discourse. When we expect technologies,designed for profit, to deliver a paradise of prosperity and convenience, we have forgotten ourselves. In response, Carr offers searching assessments of the future of work, the fate of reading, and the rise of artificial intelligence, challenging us to see our world anew. In famous essays including "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" and "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Privacy," Carr dissects the logic behind Silicon Valley's "liberation mythology," showing how technology has both enriched and imprisoned us, often at the same time. Drawing on artists ranging from Walt Whitman to the Clash, while weaving in the latest findings from science and sociology, Utopia Is Creepy compels us to question the technological momentum that has trapped us in its flow. "Resistance is never futile," argues Carr, and this audiobook delivers the proof.

    Available Formats: Download

    Utopia Is Creepy

    12.6 hrs • 10/1/16 • Unabridged
  3. 7.0 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    Tetris is perhaps the most instantly recognizable, popular video game ever made. But the fascinating story of its origins is lesser known. How did an obscure Soviet programmer, working on frail, antiquated computers, create a product that has earned nearly $1 billion in sales? How did an inspired, makeshift game turn into a worldwide sensation, which has been displayed at the Museum of Modern Art, inspired a Hollywood movie, and been played in outer space? In this surprising, trivia-filled book, tech reporter Dan Ackerman describes how, as a teenager behind the Iron Curtain, Alexey Pajitnov was struck with inspiration, then meticulously worked for years to bring the game he had envisioned to life. Ackerman shows how Tetris worked its way first through Pajitnov’s office and then out into the world, entrancing player after player with its hypnotic shapes. Then, tracing the stories of the British, American, and Japanese moguls who raced each other for the rights, Ackerman recounts the game’s complex and improbable path to global success. The Tetris Effect is an homage to both creator and creation, and a perfect gift for anyone who’s ever played the game-which is to say everyone.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Tetris Effect

    7.0 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
  4. 8.1 hrs • 8/1/2016 • Unabridged

    This 50th anniversary edition of Men, Machines, and Modern Times, though ultimately concerned with a positive alternative to an Orwellian 1984, offers an entertaining series of historical accounts taken from the nineteenth century to highlight a main theme: the nature of technological change, the fission brought about in society by such change, and society’s reaction to that change. Beginning with a remarkable illustration of resistance to innovation in the US Navy following an officer’s discovery of a more accurate way to fire a gun at sea, Elting Morison goes on to narrate the strange history of the new model steamship, the Wapanoag, in the 1860s. He then continues with the difficulties confronting the introduction of the pasteurization process for milk; he traces the development of the Bessemer process; and finally he considers the computer. While the discussions are liberally sprinkled with amusing examples and anecdotes, all are related to the more profound and current problem of how to organize and manage a system of ideas, energies, and machinery so that it will conform to the human dimension.

    Available Formats: Download

    Men, Machines, and Modern Times

    8.1 hrs • 8/1/16 • Unabridged
  5. 9.9 hrs • 5/17/2016 • Unabridged

    The Digital Age we live in is as transformative as the Industrial Revolution, and Joshua Cooper Ramo explains how to survive. If you find yourself longing for a disconnected world where information is not always at your fingertips, you may eventually be as useful as the carriage maker post–Henry Ford. It’s practically impossible to know where the marriage of imagination and technology will take us (sorry Betamax and Kodak), and the only certainty is that in the networked world we will only become more intertwined. Is it possible to not become hopelessly tangled? Joshua Cooper Ramo, a policy expert who has advised the most powerful nations and corporations, says yes—if you are ready to ride the disruption. Drawing on examples from business, science, and politics, Ramo illuminates our transformative world. Start by imagining a near future when America’s greatest power is not its military or its economy, but its control of the Internet.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Seventh Sense

    9.9 hrs • 5/17/16 • Unabridged
  6. 5.3 hrs • 5/1/2016 • Unabridged

    Most of the information available on cloud computing is either highly technical, with details that are irrelevant to non-technologists, or pure marketing hype, in which the cloud is simply a selling point. This audiobook, however, explains the cloud from the user's viewpoint -- the business user's in particular. Nayan Ruparelia explains what the cloud is, when to use it (and when not to), how to select a cloud service, how to integrate it with other technologies, and what the best practices are for using cloud computing. Cutting through the hype, Ruparelia cites the simple and basic definition of cloud computing from the National Institute of Science and Technology: a model enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources. Thus with cloud computing, businesses can harness information technology resources usually available only to large enterprises. And this, Ruparelia demonstrates, represents a paradigm shift for business. It will ease funding for startups, alter business plans, and allow big businesses greater agility. Ruparelia discusses the key issues for any organization considering cloud computing: service level agreements, business service delivery and consumption, finance, legal jurisdiction, security, and social responsibility. He introduces novel concepts made possible by cloud computing: cloud cells, or specialist clouds for specific uses; the personal cloud; the cloud of things; and cloud service exchanges. He examines use case patterns in terms of infrastructure and platform, software information, and business process; and he explains how to transition to a cloud service. Current and future users will find this book an indispensable guide to the cloud.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Cloud Computing by Nayan B. Ruparella

    Cloud Computing

    5.3 hrs • 5/1/16 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  7. 9.2 hrs • 4/12/2016 • Unabridged

    An engrossing insider’s account of how a teacher built one of the world’s most valuable companies—rivaling Walmart & Amazon—and forever reshaped the global economy. In just a decade and half, Jack Ma, a man from modest beginnings who started out as an English teacher, founded and built Alibaba into one of the world’s largest companies, an e-commerce empire on which hundreds of millions of Chinese consumers depend. Alibaba’s $25 billion IPO in 2014 was the largest global IPO ever. A Rockefeller of his age who is courted by CEOs and Presidents around the world, Jack is an icon for China’s booming private sector and the gatekeeper to hundreds of millions of middle class consumers. Duncan Clark first met Jack in 1999 in the small apartment where Jack founded Alibaba. Granted unprecedented access to a wealth of new material including exclusive interviews, Clark draws on his own experience as an early advisor to Alibaba and two decades in China chronicling the Internet’s impact on the country to create an authoritative, compelling narrative account of Alibaba’s rise. How did Jack overcome his humble origins and early failures to achieve massive success with Alibaba? How did he outsmart rival entrepreneurs from China and Silicon Valley? Can Alibaba maintain its 80 percent market share? As it forges ahead into finance and entertainment, are there limits to Alibaba’s ambitions? How does the Chinese government view its rise? Will Alibaba expand further overseas, including in the US? Clark tells Alibaba’s tale in the context of China’s momentous economic and social changes, illuminating an unlikely corporate titan as never before.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Alibaba by Duncan Clark


    9.2 hrs • 4/12/16 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  8. 5.6 hrs • 4/5/2016 • Unabridged

    The cofounder of America Online and the Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship shares a roadmap to success for future innovators. Steve Case was on the leading edge of the Internet revolution when he cofounded AOL in 1991. He was an entrepreneur in a business that hadn’t even been invented, yet he saw how significantly his efforts could change not only America, but the world. In The Third Wave, Case uses his insights garnered from nearly four decades of working as an innovator, investor, and businessperson to chart a path for future visionaries.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Third Wave

    5.6 hrs • 4/5/16 • Unabridged
  9. 18.1 hrs • 2/9/2016 • Unabridged

    Microsoft commands the high ground of the information superhighway by owning the operating systems and basic applications programs that run on hundreds of millions of computers around the world. Beyond the unquestioned genius and vision of Bill Gates, what accounts for Microsoft’s astounding success? Drawing on almost two years of on-site observation at Microsoft headquarters, eminent scientists Michael A. Cusumano and Richard W. Selby reveal many of Microsoft’s innermost secrets. This inside report, based on forty in-depth interviews by authors who had access to confidential documents and project data, outlines the seven complementary strategies that characterize exactly how Microsoft competes and operates, including the “Brain Trust” of talented employees and exceptional management; “bang for the buck” competitive strategies and clear organizational goals that produce self-critiquing, learning, and improving; a flexible, incremental approach to product development; and a relentless pursuit of future markets. Cusumano and Selby’s masterful analysis successfully uncovers the distinctive way in which Microsoft has combined all of the elements necessary to get to the top of an enormously important industry—and stay there.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Microsoft Secrets by Michael A. Cusumano, Richard W. Selby

    Microsoft Secrets

    18.1 hrs • 2/9/16 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  10. 3.7 hrs • 1/26/2016 • Unabridged

    IBM is in serious trouble. Big Blue, as the company is known, tends to rely on magical thinking for its success, but that magic ran out a long time ago. The trouble began back in the 1990s and IBM had to hire, for the first time, an outside CEO. Lou Gerstner saved the day, pushing IBM into services with spectacular results, but not without consequence. As services became commoditized, IBM could compete only by offshoring the work. Quality suffered. In addition, Gerstner’s compensation was very high, which impacted IBM negatively. In IBM history, only the Watson family hit rich running IBM. Later CEOs, like John Opel and John Akers, lived comfortable lives with many perks, but weren’t big rich. That changed with Gerstner. IBM has essentially sacrificed both its customers and its employees in the name of earnings. The company has cut labor to the bone, offshored as much as possible, and dropped quality. Acquisitions are deliberately underbid, the under-delivered. These moves, combined with share buybacks, have kept earnings growing until recently, when the house of cards began to fall. IBM’s current CEO, Ginni Rometty, has outlined an earning goal for 2015 and she is not afraid to destroy the company to achieve it. This book outlines IBM’s fall from grace, where the company is heading, and what can be done to save IBM before it’s too late.

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental

    The Decline and Fall of IBM

    3.7 hrs • 1/26/16 • Unabridged
    Also: Digital Rental
  11. 8.4 hrs • 11/1/2015 • Unabridged

    California’s Silicon Valley is home to the greatest concentration of designers in the world: corporate design offices at flagship technology companies and volunteers at nonprofit NGOs; global design consultancies and boutique studios; research laboratories and academic design programs. Together they form the interconnected network that is Silicon Valley. Apple products are famously “Designed in California,” but, as Barry Katz shows in this first-ever, extensively illustrated history, the role of design in Silicon Valley began decades before Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak dreamed up Apple in a garage. Offering a thoroughly original view of the subject, Katz tells how design helped transform Silicon Valley into the most powerful engine of innovation in the world. From Hewlett-Packard and Ampex in the 1950s to Google and Facebook today, design has provided the bridge between research and development, art and engineering, technical performance and human behavior. Katz traces the origins of all of the leading consultancies-including IDEO, frog, and Lunar-and shows the process by which some of the world’s most influential companies came to place design at the center of their business strategies. At the same time, universities, foundations, and even governments have learned to apply “design thinking” to their missions. Drawing on unprecedented access to a vast array of primary sources and interviews with nearly every influential design leader—including Douglas Engelbart, Steve Jobs, and Don Norman-Katz—reveals design to be the missing link in Silicon Valley’s ecosystem of innovation.

    Available Formats: Download

    Make It New

    8.4 hrs • 11/1/15 • Unabridged
  12. 3.9 hrs • 11/1/2015 • Unabridged

    The history of computing could be told as the story of hardware and software, or the story of the Internet, or the story of “smart” hand-held devices, with subplots involving IBM, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. In this concise and accessible account of the invention and development of digital technology, computer historian Paul Ceruzzi offers a broader and more useful perspective. He identifies four major threads that run throughout all of computing’s technological development: digitization—the coding of information, computation, and control in binary form, ones and zeros; the convergence of multiple streams of techniques, devices, and machines, yielding more than the sum of their parts; the steady advance of electronic technology, as characterized famously by Moore’s Law; and the human-machine interface. Ceruzzi guides us through computing history, telling how a Bell Labs mathematician coined the word digital in 1942 (to describe a high-speed method of calculating used in anti-aircraft devices), and recounting the development of the punch card (for use in the 1890 US Census). He describes the ENIAC, built for scientific and military applications; the UNIVAC, the first general purpose computer; and ARPANET, the Internet’s precursor. Ceruzzi’s account traces the world-changing evolution of the computer from a room-size ensemble of machinery to a “minicomputer” to a desktop computer to a pocket-sized smart phone. He describes the development of the silicon chip, which could store ever-increasing amounts of data and enabled ever-decreasing device size. He visits that hotbed of innovation, Silicon Valley, and brings the story up to the present with the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social networking.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Computing by Paul E. Ceruzzi
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  13. 7.1 hrs • 7/14/2015 • Unabridged

    An inside look at the game-changing men and women behind Alibaba, Baidu, and other rapidly emerging Chinese companies Over the last two decades, Chinese entrepreneurs have launched 40 million businesses, an astounding feat in a country that was hostile to private enterprise for decades. Some of those startups have now become world-class giants, such as Jack Ma’s Alibaba Group, China’s top internet company, which recently had the largest IPO in history. Others include Pony Ma’s online games and messaging business, Tencent, which is now the world’s third largest internet company, and Ren Zhengfei’s Huawei Technologies, the world’s leading manufacturer of telecom network equipment. Edward Tse uses his expertise and exclusive access to show what’s really going on with these and other Chinese powerhouses, such as Lei Jun’s Xiaomi, maker of “low-cost, suspiciously iPhone-like smartphones,” and Robin Li’s Baidu, often called the Google of China. Tse delves deeply into case studies of these leading Chinese companies and shows what makes them so innovative and worthy of study by businesspeople around the world. These success stories create a mixture of fear, anxiety, and intrigue for the international business community. Will Chinese entrepreneurs eventually overtake the world’s largest companies? How should their competitors respond to them in productive ways? Is it possible to compete with them in global markets while working with them on global issues? Tse answers these and many other important questions.

    Available Formats: Download

    China’s Disruptors

    7.1 hrs • 7/14/15 • Unabridged
  14. 16.4 hrs • 3/24/2015 • Unabridged

    Becoming Steve Jobs takes on and breaks down the existing myth and stereotypes about Steve Jobs and answers the central question about the life and career of the Apple cofounder and CEO: How did a reckless and arrogant young man who was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective visionary business leader of our time, ultimately transforming the daily life of billions of people? Drawing on incredible and sometimes exclusive access, Schlender and Tetzeli tell a different story of a real human being who wrestled with his failings and learned to maximize his strengths over time. Their rich, compelling narrative is filled with stories never told before from the people who knew Jobs best. Among those who decided to open up to the authors are Jobs’ family, former inner-circle executives, and top employees at Apple, Pixar, and Disney—most notably Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Ed Catmull, John Lasseter, Robert Iger, and many others. In addition, Schlender knew Jobs personally for twenty-five years and draws upon his many interviews with him—on and off the record—in writing this book. He and Rick Tetzeli humanize the man and explain, rather than simply describe, his behavior. Along the way, the book provides rich context about the technology revolution we all have lived through, and the ways in which Jobs changed our world. Schlender and Tetzeli make clear that Jobs’ astounding success at Apple was far more complicated than simply picking the right products: he became more patient, he learned to trust his inner circle, and he discovered the importance of growing the company incrementally rather than only shooting for dazzling game-changing products. A rich and revealing account that will change the way we view Jobs, Becoming Steve Jobs shows us how one of the most colorful and compelling figures of our time was able to combine his unchanging, relentless passion with a more mature management style to create one of the most valuable and beloved companies on the planet.

    Available Formats: Download

    Becoming Steve Jobs

    16.4 hrs • 3/24/15 • Unabridged
  15. 6.5 hrs • 3/10/2015 • Unabridged

    Steve Lohr, a technology reporter for the New York Times, chronicles the rise of “Big Data,” addressing cutting-edge business strategies and examining the dark side of a data-driven world. Coal, iron ore, and oil were the key productive assets that fueled the Industrial Revolution. Today data is the vital raw material of the information economy. The explosive abundance of this digital asset, more than doubling every two years, is creating a new world of opportunity and challenge. Data-ism is about this next phase in which vast, Internet-scale data sets are used for discovery and prediction in virtually every field. It is a journey across this emerging world with people, illuminating narrative examples, and insights. It shows that, if exploited, this new revolution will change the way decisions are made—relying more on data and analysis and less on intuition and experience—and transform the nature of leadership and management. Steve Lohr explains how individuals and institutions will need to exploit, protect, and manage their data to stay competitive in the coming years. Filled with rich examples and anecdotes of the various ways in which the rise of “Big Data” is affecting our daily lives, Data-ism raises provocative questions about policy and practice that have wide implications for all of our lives.

    Available Formats: Download, CD


    6.5 hrs • 3/10/15 • Unabridged
    Also: CD
  16. 8.8 hrs • 11/18/2014 • Unabridged

    A threat lurks online with the power to destroy your finances, steal your personal data, and endanger your life. In Spam Nation, investigative journalist and cyber security expert Brian Krebs unmasks the criminal masterminds driving some of the biggest spam and hacker operations targeting Americans and their bank accounts. Tracing the rise, fall, and alarming resurrection of the digital mafia behind the two largest spam pharmacies—and countless viruses, phishing, and spyware attacks—he delivers the first definitive narrative of the global spam problem and its threat to consumers everywhere. Blending cutting-edge research, investigative reporting, and firsthand interviews, this terrifying true story reveals how we unwittingly invite these digital thieves into our lives every day. From unassuming computer programmers next door to digital mobsters like Cosma—who unleashed a massive malware attack that has stolen thousands of Americans’ logins and passwords—Krebs uncovers the shocking lengths to which these people will go to profit from our data and our wallets. Not only are hundreds of thousands of Americans exposing themselves to fraud and dangerously toxic products from rogue online pharmacies, but even those who never open junk messages are at risk. As Krebs notes, spammers can—and do—hack into accounts through emails, harvest personal information like usernames and passwords, and sell them on the digital black market. The fallout from this global epidemic doesn’t just cost consumers and companies billions, it costs lives, too. Fast-paced and utterly gripping, Spam Nation ultimately proposes concrete solutions for protecting ourselves online and stemming this tidal wave of cybercrime before it’s too late.

    Available Formats: Download

    Spam Nation

    8.8 hrs • 11/18/14 • Unabridged
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