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Food Industry

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  1. 11.1 hrs • 9/13/2016 • Unabridged

    Inside what life is really like for the new generation of professional cooks—a captivating tale of the make-or-break first year at a young chef’s new restaurant. For many young people, being a chef is as compelling a dream as being a rock star or professional athlete. Skill and creativity in the kitchen are more profitable than ever before, as cooks scramble to reach the top—but talent isn’t enough. Today’s chef needs the business savvy of a high-risk entrepreneur, determination, and big dose of luck. The heart of Generation Chef is the story of Jonah Miller, who at age twenty-four attempts to fulfill a lifelong dream by opening the Basque restaurant Huertas in New York City, still the high-stakes center of the restaurant business for an ambitious young chef. Miller, a rising star who has been named to the 30-Under-30 list of both Forbes and Zagat, quits his job as a sous chef, creates a business plan, lines up investors, leases a space, hires a staff, and gets ready to put his reputation and his future on the line.Journalist and food writer Karen Stabiner takes us inside Huertas’s roller-coaster first year, but also provides insight into the challenging world a young chef faces today—the intense financial pressures, the overcrowded field of aspiring cooks, and the impact of reviews and social media, which can dictate who survives.A fast-paced narrative filled with suspense, Generation Chef is a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at drive and passion in one of today’s hottest professions.

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    Generation Chef

    11.1 hrs • 9/13/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 6.8 hrs • 6/14/2016 • Unabridged

    From the author of Bourbon, “the definitive history” (Sacramento Bee), comes the rollicking and revealing story of beer in America, in the spirit of Salt or Cod. In The United States of Beer, Dane Huckelbridge, the author of Bourbon: A History of the American Spirit—a Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance bestseller—charts the surprisingly fascinating history of Americans’ relationship with their most popular alcoholic beverage. Huckelbridge shows how beer has evolved along with the country—from a local and regional product (once upon a time every American city has its own brewery and iconic beer brand) to the rise of global mega-brands like Budweiser and Miller that are synonymous with US capitalism. We learn of George Washington’s failed attempt to brew beer at Mount Vernon with molasses instead of barley, of the nineteenth-century “Beer Barons” like Captain Frederick Pabst, Adolphus Busch, and Joseph Schlitz who revolutionized commercial brewing and built lucrative empires—and the American immigrant experience—and of the advances in brewing and bottling technology that allowed beer to flow in the saloons of the Wild West. Throughout, Huckelbridge draws connections between seemingly remote fragments of the American past and shares his reports from the front lines of today’s craft-brewing revolution.

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    The United States of Beer by Dane Huckelbridge

    The United States of Beer

    6.8 hrs • 6/14/16 • Unabridged
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    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  3. 8.7 hrs • 5/5/2015 • Unabridged

    For years Mark Bittman has taught us to cook better and more simply. Since 2011, as a New York Times opinion columnist, he has helped us cut through the noise and rhetoric of food politics to become better consumers and citizens, joining a pantheon of food influencers, including Michael Pollan and Eric Schloss, who shape the way we talk about food. Mark Bittman made headlines three years ago when it was revealed that, for the first time, the New York Times opinion page would feature a food writer to help us make sense of the tangled webs of food, health, environment, politics, and culture. Mark was the teacher who helped us cut through the pretense of cooking. And as an opinion columnist, Mark has delighted us, enraged us, and inspired us to do more for ourselves and our world in the same no-nonsense style. In the tradition of his New York Times bestselling Food Matters, this book collects the best of his columns, updated to reflect the latest research and tied together with new material to give context. But this isn’t just a simple collection. Bittman is grouping pieces to show each of them in a new light—in some cases to show us how far we’ve come in just a few years and in some cases to show us the slow unfolding of stories as they have happened over time. What emerges is a collection that shows us the story of who we are as a nation of cooks, eaters, and voters, right now.

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    A Bone to Pick

    8.7 hrs • 5/5/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 8.5 hrs • 11/11/2014 • Unabridged

    A powerful and important work of investigative journalism that explores the runaway growth of the American meatpacking industry and its dangerous consequences On the production line in American packinghouses, there is one cardinal rule: the chain never slows. Every year, the chain conveyors that set the pace of slaughter have continually accelerated to keep up with America’s growing appetite for processed meat. Acclaimed journalist Ted Genoways uses the story of Hormel Foods and soaring recession-era demand for its most famous product, Spam, to probe the state of the meatpacking industry, including the expansion of agribusiness and the effects of immigrant labor on Middle America. Genoways interviewed scores of industry line workers, union leaders, hog farmers, and local politicians and activists. He reveals an industry pushed to its breaking point and exposes alarming new trends: sick or permanently disabled workers, abused animals, water and soil pollution, and mounting conflict between small towns and immigrant workers. The narrative moves across the heartland, from Minnesota, to witness the cut-and-kill operation; to Iowa, to observe breeding and farrowing in massive hog barns; to Nebraska, to see the tense town hall meetings and broken windows caused by the arrival of Hispanic workers; and back to Minnesota, where political refugees from Burma give the workforce the power it needs to fight back. A work of brilliant reporting, The Chain is a mesmerizing story and an urgent warning about the hidden cost of the food we eat.

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    The Chain

    8.5 hrs • 11/11/14 • Unabridged
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    11.4 hrs • 11/3/2014 • Unabridged

    Coke’s insatiable thirst for resources shapes the company and reshapes the globe in this absorbing history. Coca-Cola’s success in building a global empire out of sugary water drew on more than a secret formula and brilliant advertising. The real secret to Coke’s success was its strategy, from the beginning, to offload production costs and risks onto suppliers and franchisees. Outsourcing and a trim corporate profile enabled Coke to scale up production of a low-price beverage and realize huge profits. But the costs shed by Coke have fallen on the public at large. Coke now uses an annual 79 billion gallons of water, an increasingly precious global resource, and its reliance on corn syrup has helped fuel our obesity crisis. Bartow J. Elmore explores Coke through its ingredients, showing how the company secured massive quantities of coca leaf, caffeine, sugar, and other inputs. Citizen Coke became a giant in a world of abundance; in a world of scarcity, it is a strain on resources and all who depend on them.

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    Citizen Coke by Bartow J. Elmore

    Citizen Coke

    11.4 hrs • 11/3/14 • Unabridged
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  6. 8.9 hrs • 4/29/2013 • Unabridged

    In the tradition of Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore’s Dilemma comes a fascinating and cutting-edge look at the scary truth about what really goes into our food. If a piece of individually wrapped cheese retains its shape, color, and texture for years, what does it say about the food we eat and feed our children? Former New York Times reporter and mother Melanie Warner decided to explore that question when she observed the phenomenon of the indestructible cheese. She began an investigative journey that took her to research labs, food science departments, and factories around the country. What she discovered provides a rare, eye-opening—and sometimes disturbing—account of what we’re really eating. Warner looks at how decades of food science have resulted in the cheapest, most abundant, most addictive, and most nutritionally devastating food in the world, and she uncovers startling evidence about the profound health implications of the packaged and fast foods that we eat on a daily basis. From breakfast cereal to chicken subs to nutrition bars, processed foods account for roughly seventy percent of our nation’s calories. Despite the growing presence of farmers’ markets and organic produce, strange food additives are nearly impossible to avoid. Combining meticulous research, vivid writing, and cultural analysis, Warner blows the lid off the largely undocumented—and lightly regulated—world of chemically treated and processed foods and lays bare the potential price we may pay for consuming even so-called healthy foods.

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    Pandora’s Lunchbox

    8.9 hrs • 4/29/13 • Unabridged
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