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Information Technology

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  1. 9.6 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    You are a four-dimensional human. Each of us exists in three-dimensional physical space. But, as a constellation of everyday digital phenomena rewires our lives, we are increasingly coaxed from the containment of our predigital selves into a wonderful and eerie fourth dimension, a world of ceaseless communication, instant information, and global connection. Our portals to this new world have been wedged open, and the silhouette of a figure is slowly taking shape. But what does it feel like to be four-dimensional? How do digital technologies influence the rhythms of our thoughts, the style and tilt of our consciousness? What new sensitivities and sensibilities are emerging with our exposure to the delights, sorrows, and anxieties of a networked world? And how do we live in public with these recoded private lives? Laurence Scott―hailed as a “New Generation Thinker” by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the BBC―shows how this four-dimensional life is dramatically changing us by redefining our social lives and extending the limits of our presence in the world. Blending tech philosophy with insights on everything from Seinfeld to the fall of Gaddafi, Scott stands with a rising generation of social critics hoping to understand our new reality. His virtuosic debut is a revelatory and original exploration of life in the digital age.

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    The Four-Dimensional Human by Laurence Scott

    The Four-Dimensional Human

    9.6 hrs • 8/9/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 7.1 hrs • 2/24/2015 • Unabridged

    Connectional intelligence unlocks the twenty-first-century secret to getting “big things done” regardless of who you are, where you live, or what you do. We typically associate success and leadership with smarts, passion, and luck. But in today’s hypercompetitive world, even those gifts aren’t enough. Get Big Things Done argues that the game changer is a thoroughly modern skill called connectional intelligence. Virtually anyone can maximize his or her potential and achieve breakthrough performance by developing this crucial ability. So what is it? Put simply, connectional intelligence is the ability to combine knowledge, ambition, and human capital, forging connections on a global scale that create unprecedented value and meaning. As radical a concept as emotional intelligence was in the nineties, connectional intelligence is changing everything from business and sports to academics, health, and politics by quickly, efficiently, and creatively helping people enlist supporters, drive innovation, develop strategies, and implement solutions to big problems. Can a small-town pumpkin grower affect the global food crisis? Can a Fortune 500 executive change her company’s outdated culture through video storytelling? Can a hip-hop artist launch an international happiness movement? Or can a scientist use virtual reality games to lower pain for burn victims? The answer, you’ll hear, is a resounding yes. Each of these individuals is using connectional intelligence to become a power player to get big things done. Erica Dhawan and Saj-nicole Joni’s Get Big Things Done unlocks the secrets of how the world’s movers and shakers use connectional intelligence to achieve their personal and professional goals—no matter how ambitious.

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    Get Big Things Done

    7.1 hrs • 2/24/15 • Unabridged
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  3. 12.0 hrs • 7/16/2013 • Unabridged

    The dazzling new masterwork from the prophet of Silicon Valley Jaron Lanier is the bestselling author of You Are Not a Gadget, the father of virtual reality, and one of the most influential thinkers of our time. For decades, Lanier has drawn on his expertise and experience as a computer scientist, musician, and digital-media pioneer to predict the revolutionary ways in which technology is transforming our culture. Who Owns the Future? is a visionary reckoning with the effects network technologies have had on our economy. Lanier asserts that the rise of digital networks led our economy into recession and decimated the middle class. Now, as technology flattens more and more industries—from media to medicine to manufacturing—we are facing even greater challenges to employment and personal wealth. But there is an alternative to allowing technology to own our future. In this ambitious and deeply humane book, Lanier charts the path toward a new information economy that will stabilize the middle class and allow it to grow. It is time for ordinary people to be rewarded for what they do and share on the web. Insightful, original, and provocative, Who Owns the Future? is necessary reading for everyone who lives a part of their lives online.

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    Who Owns the Future?

    12.0 hrs • 7/16/13 • Unabridged
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  4. 9.0 hrs • 4/23/2013 • Unabridged

    Radical connectivity—our ability to connect instantly, constantly, and globally—is altering the exercise of power with dramatic speed and reshaping our biggest institutions. Governments, corporations, centers of knowledge, and expertise are eroding before the power of the individual. In some cases this is a positive development, but as Mele reveals, the promise of the Internet comes with a troubling downside. How do we trust information when journalists are replaced by bloggers, phone videos, and tweets? Will the collapse of two-party government bring us qualified leaders or demagogues and special-interest-controlled politicians? When web-based micro-businesses can out-compete major corporations, who enforces basic regulations on product safety, privacy protection, fraud, and tax collection? Unless we exercise deliberate moral choice over the design and use of technologies, Mele contends, we doom ourselves to a future that tramples human values, renders social structures chaotic, and destroys rather than enhances freedom. Both hopeful and alarming, thought-provoking and passionately-argued, The End of Big is an important book about our present—and our future.

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    The End of Big

    9.0 hrs • 4/23/13 • Unabridged
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  5. 2.0 hrs • 8/1/2012 • Unabridged

    In this remarkably prescient book, Gilder predicts how television will merge with other technologies and evolve into the telecomputer, a personal computer adapted for video processing and connected by fiberoptic threads to other personal computers around the world. This interactive system will change how we do business, educate our children, and spend our leisure time. It will imperil all large, centralized organizations, including broadcasting and cable networks, phone companies, government bureaucracies, and multinational corporations. But the United States has only to unleash its industrial resources to command the “telefuture,” in which new technology will overthrow the stultifying influence of mass media, renew the power of individuals, and promote democracy throughout the world.

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    Life after Television

    2.0 hrs • 8/1/12 • Unabridged
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  6. 18.2 hrs • 8/30/2011 • Unabridged

    This memoir of a veteran NASA flight director tells riveting stories from the early days of the Mercury program through Apollo 11 (the moon landing) and Apollo 13, for both of which Kranz was flight director. Gene Kranz was present at the creation of America’s manned space program and was a key player in it for three decades. As a flight director in NASA’s Mission Control, Kranz witnessed firsthand the making of history. He participated in the space program from the early days of the Mercury program to the last Apollo mission, and beyond. He endured the disastrous first years when rockets blew up and the United States seemed to fall further behind the Soviet Union in the space race. He helped to launch Alan Shepard and John Glenn, then assumed the flight director’s role in the Gemini program, which he guided to fruition. With his teammates, he accepted the challenge to carry out President John F. Kennedy’s commitment to land a man on the moon before the end of the 1960s. Kranz recounts these thrilling historic events and offers new information about the famous flights. What appeared as nearly flawless missions to the moon were, in fact, a series of hair-raising near misses. When the space technology failed, as it sometimes did, the controllers’ only recourse was to rely on their skills and those of their teammates. He reveals behind-the-scenes details to demonstrate the leadership, discipline, trust, and teamwork that made the space program a success. A fascinating firsthand account by a veteran mission controller of one of America’s greatest achievements, Failure is Not an Option reflects on what has happened to the space program and offers his own bold suggestions about what we ought to be doing in space now.

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    Failure Is Not an Option

    18.2 hrs • 8/30/11 • Unabridged
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  7. 14.8 hrs • 5/10/2011 • Unabridged

    Consider Facebook—it’s human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It’s a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today’s self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity

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    Alone Together

    14.8 hrs • 5/10/11 • Unabridged
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  8. 16.6 hrs • 3/1/2011 • Unabridged

    The story of information begins in a time profoundly unlike our own, when every thought and utterance vanishes as soon as it is born. From the invention of scripts and alphabets to the long-misunderstood talking drums of Africa, Gleick tells the story of information technologies that changed the very nature of human consciousness. He provides portraits of the key figures contributing to the inexorable development of our modern understanding of information: Charles Babbage, the idiosyncratic inventor of the first great mechanical computer; Ada Byron, the brilliant and doomed daughter of the poet, who became the first true programmer; pivotal figures like Samuel Morse and Alan Turing; and Claude Shannon, the creator of information theory itself. And then the information age arrives. Citizens of this world become experts willy-nilly: aficionados of bits and bytes. And we sometimes feel we are drowning, swept by a deluge of signs and signals, news and images, blogs and tweets. The Information is the story of how we got here and where we are heading.

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    The Information

    16.6 hrs • 3/1/11 • Unabridged
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  9. 5.8 hrs • 10/14/2003 • Abridged

    In her acclaimed AOL.COM, Kara Swisher chronicled the unlikely ascent of a group of underdog entrepreneurs and their influence on American net culture. This book picks up where the previous one left off, investigating AOL’s merger with Time Warner and its aftermath. Journalists Swisher and Dickey have an ear for the comic and an appreciation for the larger-than-life personalities that propel the drama. After the merger, a troubled journey lies ahead both for AOL Time Warner and for its competitors. Microsoft, Yahoo, Disney, and AT&T all circle for position, hoping for the worst. But like the little boy who searches through a pile of horse manure looking for the pony, the companies are vigorously scooping their way forward—often without a clue.

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    There Must Be a Pony In Here Somewhere

    5.8 hrs • 10/14/03 • Abridged
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  10. 10.1 hrs • 3/28/2002 • Unabridged

    Here’s some of what just happened: millions of ordinary, sensible people came into possession of computers. These machines had wondrous powers, yet made unexpected demands on their owners. Telephones broke free of the chains that had shackled them to bedside tables and office desks. No one was out of touch, or wanted to be out of touch. Instant communication became a birthright. A new world, located no one knew exactly where, came into being, called “virtual” or “online,” named “cyberspace” or “the Internet” or just “the network.” Manners and markets took on new shapes and guises. As all this was happening, James Gleick, author of the groundbreaking Chaos, columnist for The New York Times Magazine, and—very briefly—an Internet entrepreneur, emerged as one of our most astute guides to this new world. His dispatches—by turns passionate, bewildered, angry, and amazed—form an extraordinary chronicle. Gleick loves what the network makes possible, and he hates it. Software makers developed a strangely tolerant view of an ancient devil, the product defect. One company, at first a feisty upstart, seized control of the hidden gears and levers of the new economy. We wrestled with novel issues of privacy, anonymity, and disguise. We found that if the human species is evolving a sort of global brain, it’s susceptible to new forms of hysteria and multiple-personality disorder. What Just Happened is at once a remarkable portrait of a world in the throes of transformation and a prescient guide to the transformation still to come.

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    What Just Happened

    10.1 hrs • 3/28/02 • Unabridged
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  11. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    5.1 hrs • 2/6/2001 • Abridged

    You may be a hacker and not even know it. Being a hacker has nothing to do with cyberterrorism, and it doesn’t even necessarily relate to the open-source movement. Being a hacker has more to do with your underlying assumptions about stress, time management, work, and play. It’s about harmonizing the rhythms of your creative work with the rhythms of the rest of your life so that they amplify each other. It is a fundamentally new work ethic that is revolutionizing the way business is being done around the world. Without hackers there would be no universal access to e-mail, no Internet, no World Wide Web, but the hacker ethic has spread far beyond the world of computers. It is a mind-set, a philosophy, based on the values of play, passion, sharing, and creativity, that has the potential to enhance every individual’s and company’s productivity and competitiveness. Now there is a greater need than ever for entrepreneurial versatility of the sort that has made hackers the most important innovators of our day. Pekka Himanen shows how we all can make use of this ongoing transformation in the way we approach our working lives.

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    The Hacker Ethic

    Prologue by Linus Torvalds
    Epilogue by Manuel Castells
    Read by Oliver Wyman
    5.1 hrs • 2/6/01 • Abridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
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