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Computers & Technology

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  1. 6.2 hrs • 12/1/2014 • Unabridged

    Virtual training gives learning professionals unprecedented flexibility, making it possible to reach participants globally and unite physically dispersed teams. But designers and facilitators must adapt their programs and delivery styles in order to be effective in this new medium. The Successful Virtual Classroom goes beyond introducing the technology, to offer trainers proven techniques tailored specifically to engage live online audiences. Packed with easy-to-use tools, checklists, and worksheets—as well as case studies from Oracle, UPS, and more—the book introduces the PREP model for planning, rehearsing, executing, and then conducting a postmortem following the training event. Readers will learn how to make the most of  virtual classroom features such as content and screen sharing, annotation tools, polls, and breakout rooms;weave chat responses into the discussion;compensate for the absence of body language;monitor feedback;engage individuals with different learning styles;encourage audience contribution;meet the unique needs of global participants; andmuch more. Featuring icebreakers and interactive exercises designed for an online environment, this book helps readers create programs that truly drive learner engagement.

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    The Successful Virtual Classroom

    6.2 hrs • 12/1/14 • Unabridged
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  2. 8.8 hrs • 10/2/2012 • Unabridged

    Investment firm Y Combinator is the most sought-after home for startups in Silicon Valley. Twice a year, it funds dozens of just-founded startups and provides three months of guidance from Paul Graham, YC’s impresario, and his partners, also entrepreneurs and mostly YC alumni. The list of YC-funded success stories includes Dropbox (now valued at $5 billion) and Airbnb ($1.3 billion). Receiving an offer from YC creates the opportunity of a lifetime. It’s like American Idol for budding entrepreneurs. Acclaimed journalist Randall Stross was granted unprecedented access to Y Combinator’s summer 2011 batch of young companies, offering a unique inside tour of the world of software startups. Most of the founders were male programmers in their mid-twenties or younger. Over the course of the summer, they scrambled to heed Graham’s seemingly simple advice: make something people want. We watch the founders work round-the-clock, developing and retooling products as diverse as a website that can teach anyone programming, to a Wikipedia-like site for rap lyrics, to software written by a pair of attorneys who seek to “make attorneys obsolete.” Founders are guided by Graham’s notoriously direct form of tough-love feedback. “Here, we don’t fire you,” he says. “The market fires you. If you’re sucking, I’m not going to run along behind you, saying, ‘You’re sucking, you’re sucking, c’mon, stop sucking.’” Some teams would even abandon their initial idea midsummer and scramble to begin anew. The program culminated in “Demo Day,” when founders pitched their startup to several hundred top angel investors and venture capitalists. A lucky few attracted capital that gave their startup a valuation of multiple millions of dollars. Others went back to the drawing board. This is the definitive story of a seismic shift that’s occurred in the business world, in which coding skill trumps employment experience, pairs of undergraduates confidently take on Goliaths, tiny startups working out of an apartment scale fast, and investors fall in love.

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    The Launch Pad

    8.8 hrs • 10/2/12 • Unabridged
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  3. 13.9 hrs • 8/18/2011 • Unabridged

    When Cathy Davidson and Duke University gave free iPods to every member of the incoming freshman class in 2003, they didn’t expect the uproar that followed. Critics called it a waste: What educational value could a music player have for college kids? Yet by the end of the year, Duke students had found academic uses for the new devices in virtually every discipline. The iPod experiment proved to be a classic example of the power of disruption—a way of refocusing attention to illuminate unseen possibilities. Using cutting-edge research on the brain, Davidson shows how the phenomenon of “attention blindness” shapes our lives, and how it has led to one of the greatest problems of our historical moment: although we blog, tweet, and text as if by instinct, far too many of us still toil in schools and workplaces designed for the last century, not the one we live in. To change this, we must ask ourselves critical questions: How can we redesign our schools to prepare our kids for the challenges they’ll face as adults? What will the workers and workplaces of the future look like? And how can we learn to adapt to life changes that seem almost too revolutionary to contemplate? Davidson takes us on a tour of the future of work and education, introducing us to visionaries whose groundbreaking ideas will soon affect us all. Now You See It opens a window onto the possibilities of a world in which the rigid ideas of the twentieth century have been wiped away and replaced with the flowing, collaborative spirit built into the very design of the Internet.

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    Now You See It

    13.9 hrs • 8/18/11 • Unabridged
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