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  1. 1.1 hrs • 9/5/2016 • Unabridged

    Hippias of Elis travels throughout the Greek world practicing and teaching the art of making beautiful speeches. On a rare visit to Athens, he meets Socrates, who questions him about the nature of his art. Socrates is especially curious about how Hippias would define beauty. They agree that beauty makes all beautiful things beautiful, but when Socrates presses him to say precisely what he means, Hippias is unable to deliver such a definition. The more Socrates probes, the more absurd the responses from Hippias become. This is one of Plato’s best comedies and one of his finest efforts at posing the philosophical problem of the difference between particular things and universal qualities.

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    Plato's Greater Hippias

    Read by Ray Childs
    1.1 hrs • 9/5/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 17.4 hrs • 8/1/2016 • Unabridged

    The story of the world’s greatest civilization spans four thousand years of history that has shaped the world. It is full of spectacular cities and epic stories of a constantly evolving society peopled with inventors, heroes and heroines, villains, artisans, and pioneers. Professor Joann Fletcher pulls together the complete story of Egypt, charting the rise and fall of the ancient Egyptians while putting their whole world into a context to which we can all relate. Fletcher uncovers some fascinating revelations: new evidence shows that women became pharaohs on at least ten occasions and that the ancient Egyptians built the first Suez Canal and then circumnavigated Africa. From Ramses II’s penchant for dying his grey hair to how we know that Montuhotep’s chief wife bit her nails, Dr. Joann Fletcher brings alive the history and people of ancient Egypt as nobody else can.

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    The Story of Egypt by Joann Fletcher

    The Story of Egypt

    17.4 hrs • 8/1/16 • Unabridged
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  3. 1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
    6.4 hrs • 4/5/2016 • Unabridged

    This compelling reference presents the history of ancient Greece—the culture that brought us democracy, the Olympics, Socrates, and Alexander the Great—through gripping stories: the rise and fall of the phenomenal empire, the powerful legacy left by ancient Greece for the modern world, the new discoveries shedding light on these ancient people that are still so much with us. Greek art and architecture dominate our cities; modern military strategists still study and employ Hellenic war tactics; Greek poetry, plays, and philosophy are widely read and enjoyed; and science, mathematics, medicine, and astronomy all build on the fundamentals of early Greek thinking. Gain fascinating insights into Greek island living, ancient social networking, and the extreme priority Greeks placed on athletic competition. Learn of spectacular discoveries such as buried palaces, the Uluburun shipwreck, and the earliest writing ever found in Europe. A stunning treasure, this uniquely comprehensive and accessible history of ancient Greece is perfect for anyone interested in the origins of our modern world.

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    The Greeks by Diane Harris Cline

    The Greeks

    6.4 hrs • 4/5/16 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
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  4. 14.3 hrs • 3/1/2016 • Unabridged

    A profound and moving journey into the heart of Christianity that explores the mysterious and often paradoxical lives and legacies of the Twelve Apostles—a book both for those of the faith and for others who seek to understand Christianity from the outside in. Peter, Matthew, Thomas, John: Who were these men? What was their relationship to Jesus? Tom Bissell provides rich and surprising answers to these ancient, elusive questions. He examines not just who these men were (and weren’t), but also how their identities have taken shape over the course of two millennia. Ultimately, Bissell finds that the story of the apostles is the story of early Christianity: its competing versions of Jesus’s ministry, its countless schisms, and its ultimate evolution from an obscure Jewish sect to the global faith we know today in all its forms and permutations. In his quest to understand the underpinnings of the world’s largest religion, Bissell embarks on a years-long pilgrimage to the supposed tombs of the Twelve Apostles. He travels from Jerusalem and Rome to Turkey, Greece, Spain, France, India, and Kyrgyzstan, vividly capturing the rich diversity of Christianity’s worldwide reach. Along the way, he engages with a host of characters—priests, paupers, a Vatican archaeologist, a Palestinian taxi driver, a Russian monk—posing sharp questions that range from the religious to the philosophical to the political. Written with warmth, empathy, and rare acumen, Apostle is a brilliant synthesis of travel writing, biblical history, and a deep, lifelong relationship with Christianity. The result is an unusual, erudite, and at times hilarious book—a religious, intellectual, and personal adventure fit for believers, scholars, and wanderers alike.

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    Apostle

    14.3 hrs • 3/1/16 • Unabridged
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  5. 27.5 hrs • 1/21/2016 • Unabridged

    In this, the first prose history in European civilization, Herodotus describes the growth of the Persian Empire with force, authority and style. Perhaps most famously, the book tells the heroic tale of the Greeks’ resistance to the vast invading force assembled by Xerxes, King of Persia. Here are not only the great battles—Marathon, Thermopylae and Salamis—but also penetrating human insight and a powerful sense of epic destiny at work.

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    Histories

    27.5 hrs • 1/21/16 • Unabridged
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  6. 14.4 hrs • 11/24/2015 • Unabridged

    More than 2,500 years ago, a confederation of small Greek city-states defeated the invading armies of Persia, the most powerful empire in the world. In this meticulously researched study, historian Paul Rahe argues that Sparta was responsible for the initial establishment of the Hellenic defensive coalition and was, in fact, the most essential player in its ultimate victory. Drawing from an impressive range of ancient sources, including Herodotus and Plutarch, the author veers from the traditional Athenocentric view of the Greco-Persian Wars to examine from a Spartan perspective the grand strategy that halted the Persian juggernaut. Rahe provides a fascinating, detailed picture of life in Sparta circa 480 BC, revealing how the Spartans’ form of government and the regimen to which they subjected themselves instilled within them the pride, confidence, discipline, and discernment necessary to forge an alliance that would stand firm against a great empire, driven by religious fervor, that held sway over two-fifths of the human race.

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    The Grand Strategy of Classical Sparta by Paul A. Rahe
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  7. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    14.9 hrs • 11/10/2015

    Graham Hancock’s multimillion bestseller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply controversial, wide-ranging investigation of the mysteries of our past and the evidence for Earth’s lost civilization. Twenty years on, Hancock returns with the sequel to his seminal work filled with completely new scientific and archaeological evidence, which has only recently come to light…. Near the end of the last Ice Age, 12,800 years ago, a giant comet that had entered the solar system from deep space thousands of years earlier broke into multiple fragments. Some of these struck the Earth, causing a global cataclysm on a scale unseen since the extinction of the dinosaurs. At least eight of the fragments hit the North American ice cap while further fragments hit the Northern European ice cap. The impacts, from comet fragments a mile wide approaching at more than 60,000 miles an hour, generated huge amounts of heat that instantly liquidized millions of square kilometers of ice, destabilizing the Earth’s crust and causing the global deluge that is remembered in myths all around the world. A second series of impacts, equally devastating, causing further cataclysmic flooding, occurred 11,600 years ago—the exact date that Plato gave for the destruction and submergence of Atlantis. The evidence revealed in this book shows beyond reasonable doubt that an advanced civilization that flourished during the Ice Age was destroyed in the global cataclysms between 12,800 and 11,600 years ago. But there were survivors—known to later cultures by names such as “the Sages,” “the Magicians,” “the Shining Ones,” and “the Mystery Teachers of Heaven.” They traveled the world in their great ships, doing all in their power to keep the spark of civilization burning. They settled at key locations—Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, Baalbek in Lebanon, Giza in Egypt, ancient Sumer, Mexico, Peru, and across the Pacific, where a huge pyramid has recently been discovered in Indonesia. Everywhere they went these “Magicians of the Gods” brought with them the memory of a time when mankind had fallen out of harmony with the universe and paid a heavy price. A memory and a warning to the future…for the comet that wrought such destruction between 12,800 and 11,600 years may not be done with us yet. Astronomers believe that a 20-mile-wide “dark” fragment of the original giant comet remains hidden within its debris stream and threatens the Earth. An astronomical message encoded at Gobekli Tepe, and in the Sphinx and the pyramids of Egypt, warns that the “Great Return” will occur in our time…

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    Magicians of the Gods

    14.9 hrs • 11/10/15
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  8. 0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    16.1 hrs • 10/20/2015 • Unabridged

    Author and historian Tom Holland returns to his roots in Roman history and the audience he cultivated with Rubicon—his masterful, witty, brilliantly researched popular history of the fall of the Roman republic—with Dynasty, a luridly fascinating history of the reign of the first five Roman emperors. Dynasty continues Rubicon’s story, opening where that book ended: with the murder of Julius Caesar. This is the period of the first and perhaps greatest Roman emperors. It’s a colorful story of rule and ruination, from the rise of Augustus to the death of Nero. Holland’s expansive history also has distinct shades of I, Claudius, with five wonderfully vivid (and in three cases, thoroughly depraved) emperors—Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero—featured, along with numerous fascinating secondary characters. Intrigue, murder, naked ambition and treachery, greed, gluttony, lust, incest, pageantry, decadence—the tale of these five Caesars continues to cast a mesmerizing spell across the millennia.

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    Dynasty by Tom Holland

    Dynasty

    16.1 hrs • 10/20/15 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
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  9. 17.2 hrs • 6/2/2015 • Unabridged

    A masterfully told—and deeply human—story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy’s Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history.

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    Antony & Cleopatra

    17.2 hrs • 6/2/15 • Unabridged
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  10. 9.8 hrs • 3/17/2015 • Unabridged

    Adam Nicolson sees the Iliad and the Odyssey as the foundation myths of Greek consciousness—and our own—collapsing the passage of 4,000 years and making the distant past of the Mediterranean world as immediate to us as the events of our own time. Homer’s poems occupy, as Adam Nicolson writes, “a third space” in the way we relate to the past: not as memory, which lasts no more than three generations, nor as the objective accounts of history but as epic, invented after memory but before history, poetry which aims “to bind the wounds that time inflicts.” The Homeric poems are among the oldest stories we have, drawing on deep roots in the Eurasian steppes beyond the Black Sea. These poems, which ask eternal questions about the individual and the community, honor and service, and love and war, tell us how we became who we are.

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    Why Homer Matters

    9.8 hrs • 3/17/15 • Unabridged
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  11. 10.1 hrs • 3/10/2015 • Unabridged

    The New York Times bestselling author of Turn Right at Machu Picchu sets out to uncover the truth behind the legendary lost city of Atlantis. A few years ago, Mark Adams made a strange discovery: everything we know about the lost city of Atlantis comes from the work of one man, the Greek philosopher Plato. Then he made a second, stranger discovery: amateur explorers are still actively searching for this sunken city all around the world, based entirely on the clues Plato left behind. Exposed to the Atlantis obsession, Adams decides to track down these people and determine why they believe it’s possible to find the world’s most famous lost city and whether any of their theories could prove or disprove its existence. He visits scientists who use cutting-edge technology to find legendary civilizations once thought to be fictional. He examines the numerical and musical codes hidden in Plato’s writings, and with the help of some charismatic sleuths traces their roots back to Pythagoras, the sixth-century BC mathematician. He learns how ancient societies transmitted accounts of cataclysmic events—and how one might dig out the “kernel of truth” in Plato’s original tale. Meet Me in Atlantis is Adams’ enthralling account of his quest to solve one of history’s greatest mysteries; a travelogue that takes readers to fascinating locations to meet irresistible characters; and a deep, often humorous look at the human longing to rediscover a lost world.

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    Meet Me in Atlantis

    10.1 hrs • 3/10/15 • Unabridged
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  12. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    8.3 hrs • 3/3/2015 • Unabridged

    Thanks to William Shakespeare, the death of Julius Caesar is the most famous assassination in history. But what actually happened on March 15, 44 BC, is even more gripping than Shakespeare’s play. In this thrilling new book, Barry Strauss tells the real story. Shakespeare shows Caesar’s assassination to be an amateur and idealistic affair. The real killing, however, was a carefully planned paramilitary operation—a general’s plot—put together by Caesar’s disaffected officers and designed with precision. There were even gladiators on hand to protect the assassins from vengeance by Caesar’s friends. Brutus and Cassius were indeed key players, as Shakespeare has it, but they had the help of a third man—Decimus. He was the mole in Caesar’s entourage, one of Caesar’s leading generals, and a lifelong friend. It was he, not Brutus, who truly betrayed Caesar. Caesar’s assassins saw him as a military dictator who wanted to be king. He threatened a permanent change in the Roman way of life and in the power of senators. The assassins rallied support among the common people, but they underestimated Caesar’s soldiers, who flooded Rome. The assassins were vanquished; their beloved Republic became the Roman Empire. An original, fresh perspective on an event that seems well known, Barry Strauss’ book sheds new light on this fascinating, pivotal moment in world history.

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    The Death of Caesar

    8.3 hrs • 3/3/15 • Unabridged
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  13. 7.9 hrs • 2/24/2015 • Unabridged

    Finding Jesus explores six major artifacts, including the Shroud of Turin, the True Cross, and John the Baptist, that give us the most direct evidence about the life and world of Jesus. The book and attendant CNN series provide a dramatic way to retell “the greatest story ever told” while introducing a broad audience to the history, the latest controversies, and newest forensic science involved in sorting out facts from the fiction of would-be forgers and deceivers. The book and the show draw on experts from all over the world. Beyond the faithful, Finding Jesus will appeal to the skeptical and to curious readers of history and archaeology, while it takes viewers of the primetime television series deeper into the story.

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    Finding Jesus: Faith. Fact. Forgery

    7.9 hrs • 2/24/15 • Unabridged
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  14. 18.4 hrs • 12/30/2015 • Unabridged

    In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable, its vast territory accounting for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken eastern empire remained. In his account of the fall of the Roman Empire, prizewinning author Adrian Goldsworthy examines the painful centuries of the superpower’s decline. Bringing history to life through the stories of the men, women, heroes, and villains involved, the author uncovers surprising lessons about the rise and fall of great nations. This was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

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    How Rome Fell

    18.4 hrs • 12/30/14 • Unabridged
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  15. 12.9 hrs • 11/12/2014 • Unabridged

    In a startling follow-up to the New York Times bestseller The Jesus Family Tomb, a historical detective story that unravels a newly translated document filled with startling revelations and fascinating detail about the life and times of Jesus Waiting to be rediscovered in the British Library is an ancient manuscript of the early Church, copied by an anonymous monk. The manuscript is at least 1,450 years old, possibly dating to the first century, Jesus’ lifetime. And now The Lost Gospel provides the first-ever translation from Syriac into English of this unique document that tells the inside story of Jesus’ social, family, and political life. The Lost Gospel takes listeners on an unparalleled historical adventure through a paradigm-shifting manuscript. What the authors eventually discover is astounding: confirmation of Jesus’ marriage to Mary the Magdalene; the names of their two children; the towering presence of Mary the Magdalene; a previously unknown plot on Jesus’ life, thirteen years prior to the crucifixion; an assassination attempt against Mary the Magdalene and their children; Jesus’ connection to political figures at the highest level of the Roman Empire; and a religious movement that antedates that of Paul—the Church of Mary the Magdalene. Part historical detective story, part modern adventure, The Lost Gospel reveals secrets that have been hiding in plain sight for millennia.

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    The Lost Gospel by Simcha Jacobovici, Barrie Wilson

    The Lost Gospel

    12.9 hrs • 11/12/14 • Unabridged
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  16. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    10.4 hrs • 10/14/2014 • Unabridged

    An engrossing biography of the longest-reigning female pharaoh in ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power Hatshepsut—the daughter of a general who usurped Egypt’s throne and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty—was born into a privileged position in the royal household, and she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her improbable rule as a cross-dressing king. At just over twenty, Hatshepsut ascended to the rank of pharaoh in an elaborate coronation ceremony that set the tone for her spectacular reign as co-regent with Thutmose III, the infant king whose mother Hatshepsut outmaneuvered for a seat on the throne. Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays in the veil of piety and sexual reinvention. Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut shrewdly operated the levers of power to emerge as Egypt’s second female pharaoh. Hatshepsut successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her monuments were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her unprecedented rule. Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power—and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

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    The Woman Who Would Be King

    10.4 hrs • 10/14/14 • Unabridged
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