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Rome

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  1. 0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    16.1 hrs • 10/20/2015 • Unabridged

    Author and historian Tom Holland returns to his roots in Roman history and the audience he cultivated with Rubicon—his masterful, witty, brilliantly researched popular history of the fall of the Roman republic—with Dynasty, a luridly fascinating history of the reign of the first five Roman emperors. Dynasty continues Rubicon’s story, opening where that book ended: with the murder of Julius Caesar. This is the period of the first and perhaps greatest Roman emperors. It’s a colorful story of rule and ruination, from the rise of Augustus to the death of Nero. Holland’s expansive history also has distinct shades of I, Claudius, with five wonderfully vivid (and in three cases, thoroughly depraved) emperors—Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero—featured, along with numerous fascinating secondary characters. Intrigue, murder, naked ambition and treachery, greed, gluttony, lust, incest, pageantry, decadence—the tale of these five Caesars continues to cast a mesmerizing spell across the millennia.

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    Dynasty by Tom Holland

    Dynasty

    16.1 hrs • 10/20/15 • Unabridged
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  2. 17.2 hrs • 6/2/2015 • Unabridged

    A masterfully told—and deeply human—story of love, politics, and ambition, Adrian Goldsworthy’s Antony and Cleopatra delivers a compelling reassessment of a major episode in ancient history.

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    Antony & Cleopatra

    17.2 hrs • 6/2/15 • Unabridged
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  3. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    8.3 hrs • 3/3/2015 • Unabridged

    Thanks to William Shakespeare, the death of Julius Caesar is the most famous assassination in history. But what actually happened on March 15, 44 BC, is even more gripping than Shakespeare’s play. In this thrilling new book, Barry Strauss tells the real story. Shakespeare shows Caesar’s assassination to be an amateur and idealistic affair. The real killing, however, was a carefully planned paramilitary operation—a general’s plot—put together by Caesar’s disaffected officers and designed with precision. There were even gladiators on hand to protect the assassins from vengeance by Caesar’s friends. Brutus and Cassius were indeed key players, as Shakespeare has it, but they had the help of a third man—Decimus. He was the mole in Caesar’s entourage, one of Caesar’s leading generals, and a lifelong friend. It was he, not Brutus, who truly betrayed Caesar. Caesar’s assassins saw him as a military dictator who wanted to be king. He threatened a permanent change in the Roman way of life and in the power of senators. The assassins rallied support among the common people, but they underestimated Caesar’s soldiers, who flooded Rome. The assassins were vanquished; their beloved Republic became the Roman Empire. An original, fresh perspective on an event that seems well known, Barry Strauss’ book sheds new light on this fascinating, pivotal moment in world history.

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    The Death of Caesar

    8.3 hrs • 3/3/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 18.4 hrs • 12/30/2015 • Unabridged

    In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable, its vast territory accounting for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken eastern empire remained. In his account of the fall of the Roman Empire, prizewinning author Adrian Goldsworthy examines the painful centuries of the superpower’s decline. Bringing history to life through the stories of the men, women, heroes, and villains involved, the author uncovers surprising lessons about the rise and fall of great nations. This was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

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    How Rome Fell

    18.4 hrs • 12/30/14 • Unabridged
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  5. 0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    18.4 hrs • 8/26/2014 • Unabridged

    In the year 44 BC, when Julius Caesar was killed, Augustus was a mere teenager who had been adopted into Caesar’s household. His reaction to Caesar’s death was to step forward and proclaim himself Caesar’s rightful successor. The Senate did not take him seriously, but over the following months he raised his own army and, after defeating Mark Antony in battle, became one of the three most powerful men in Rome. He was not yet twenty years old. Over the next ten years he consolidated his power in Rome and finally overthrew the last of his rivals in 31 BC. From that moment on, Rome became an empire and Augustus its first emperor. This is the story of how one man rose to become the most powerful man in the world and stabilized an empire that had been racked by decades of civil war. Augustus’ achievements, and his legacy, are almost unparalleled. Like Julius Caesar, he presided over a huge expansion in wealth and territory. Like Caesar, he was honored by having a month of the year named after him. But unlike Caesar, he was able to keep hold of power for over forty years and bequeath the empire, whole, to his successors.

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    Augustus

    18.4 hrs • 8/26/14 • Unabridged
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  6. 7.2 hrs • 8/21/2014 • Abridged

    Edward Gibbon’s The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire occupies an immortal place in the pantheon of historical masterpieces. This recording covers the final three volumes of Gibbon’s work, tracing ten centuries in the life of the eastern half of the empire, whose capital city was Constantinople. Among the many figures who stride across Gibbon’s stage here are the emperor Justinian I, a noble statesman and successful warrior brought low by his lascivious wife, the former prostitute Theodora; the murdering Basil I, a peasant who nonetheless proved himself a worthy figure upon which to drape the purple; and the final emperor, Constantine XI, who died on the battlements of Constantinople in 1453 while valiantly fighting a losing battle to prevent the Turks from gaining a city they had craved for centuries. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is still the work that sets the standard for all histories of the period.

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    24.8 hrs • 8/12/2014 • Unabridged

    Tracing the extraordinary trajectory of Caesar’s life, Adrian Goldsworthy covers not only the great Roman emperor’s accomplishments as charismatic orator, conquering general, and powerful dictator but also lesser-known chapters during which he was high priest of an exotic cult, captive of pirates, seducer not only of Cleopatra but also of the wives of his two main political rivals, and rebel condemned by his own country. Ultimately, Goldsworthy realizes the full complexity of Caesar’s character and shows why his political and military leadership continues to resonate some two thousand years later. In the introduction to his biography of the great Roman emperor, Adrian Goldsworthy writes, “Caesar was at times many things, including a fugitive, prisoner, rising politician, army leader, legal advocate, rebel, dictator … as well as husband, father, lover, and adulterer.” In this landmark biography, Goldsworthy examines Caesar in all of these roles and places his subject firmly within the context of Roman society in the first century BC.

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    Caesar

    24.8 hrs • 8/12/14 • Unabridged
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    36.5 hrs • 3/1/2014 • Unabridged

    The third volume of Will Durant’s Pulitzer Prize–winning series, Caesar and Christ chronicles the history of Roman civilization and of Christianity from their beginnings to 325 AD. In this masterful work, listeners will learn about: • the Etruscan civilization of ancient Italy • the birth of the Roman Republic and the beginnings of Roman law • the great reigns of Caesar and Antony • the people of Rome—the artisans, tradesmen, and scientists • the places of Rome’s great empire • the beginnings of Christianity and its growth • the rise of Constantine and the fall of the empire

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    Caesar and Christ by Will Durant

    Caesar and Christ

    36.5 hrs • 3/1/14 • Unabridged
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  9. 3.6 hrs • 8/1/2013 • Unabridged

    This fictional classic describes the factual persecution endured by the early Christians living in the catacombs beneath Rome through the character of Marellus, a captain in the Praetorian Guard and despised Christian. Penned by an anonymous nineteenth-century author, Martyr of the Catacombs has challenged and encouraged the faithful for over a hundred years.

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    Martyr of the Catacombs

    3.6 hrs • 8/1/13 • Unabridged
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  10. 14.3 hrs • 9/17/2012 • Unabridged

    From Anthony Everitt, the bestselling author of acclaimed biographies of Cicero, Augustus, and Hadrian, comes a riveting, magisterial account of Rome and its remarkable ascent from an obscure agrarian backwater to the greatest empire the world has ever known. Emerging as a market town from a cluster of hill villages in the eighth and seventh centuries BC, Rome grew to become the ancient world’s preeminent power. Everitt fashions the story of Rome’s rise to glory into an erudite page-turner filled with lasting lessons for our time. He chronicles the clash between patricians and plebeians that defined the politics of the Republic. He shows how Rome’s shrewd strategy of offering citizenship to her defeated subjects was instrumental in expanding the reach of her burgeoning empire. And he outlines the corrosion of constitutional norms that accompanied Rome’s imperial expansion, as old habits of political compromise gave way, leading to violence and civil war. In the end, unimaginable wealth and power corrupted the traditional virtues of the Republic, and Rome was left triumphant everywhere except within its own borders. Everitt paints indelible portraits of the great Romans—and non-Romans—who left their mark on the world out of which the mighty empire grew: Cincinnatus, Rome’s George Washington, the very model of the patrician warrior/aristocrat; the brilliant general Scipio Africanus, who turned back a challenge from the Carthaginian legend Hannibal; and Alexander the Great, the invincible Macedonian conqueror who became a role model for generations of would-be Roman rulers. Here also are the intellectual and philosophical leaders whose observations on the art of government and “the good life” have inspired every Western power from antiquity to the present: Cato the Elder, the famously incorruptible statesman who spoke out against the decadence of his times, and Cicero, the consummate orator whose championing of republican institutions put him on a collision course with Julius Caesar and whose writings on justice and liberty continue to inform our political discourse today. Rome’s decline and fall have long fascinated historians, but the story of how the empire was won is every bit as compelling. With The Rise of Rome, one of our most revered chroniclers of the ancient world tells that tale in a way that will galvanize, inform, and enlighten modern readers.

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    The Rise of Rome

    14.3 hrs • 9/17/12 • Unabridged
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  11. 14.8 hrs • 7/11/2011 • Unabridged

    To an extraordinary extent we continue to live in the shadow of the classical world. At every level, from languages to calendars to political systems, we are the descendants of a "classical Europe," using frames of reference created by ancient Mediterranean cultures. As this consistently fresh and surprising new audio book makes clear, however, this was no less true for the inhabitants of those classical civilizations themselves, whose myths, history, and buildings were an elaborate engagement with an already old and revered past-one filled with great leaders and writers, emigrations and battles. Indeed, much of the reason we know so much about the classical past is because of the obsessive importance it held for so many generations of Greeks and Romans, who interpreted and reinterpreted their changing casts of heroes and villains. Figures such as Alexander the Great and Augustus Caesar loom large in our imaginations today, but they themselves were fascinated by what had preceded them. A stunning work of research and imagination, The Birth of Classical Europe is an authoritative history, covering two millennia of human experience and casting new light on the world that in many ways still defines our own. In their thoughtful look at the twin engines of memory and culture, Simon Price and Peter Thonemann show how our own changing values and interests have shaped our feelings about an era that is by some measures very remote but by others startlingly close.

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    The Birth of Classical Europe

    14.8 hrs • 7/11/11 • Unabridged
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  12. 20.3 hrs • 6/22/2011 • Unabridged

    Hannibal is often considered the finest general the world has ever known. Setting out from Carthaginian-dominated Spain with a small army of select troops, he fought his way over the Pyrenees and crossed the Alps with elephants and a full baggage train. Descending into Italy, he destroyed the main Roman army at Lake Trasimeno and came close to conquering Rome itself. At Cannae, Hannibal’s brilliant cavalry tactics enabled him to destroy a reassembled Roman army, and his subsequent defeats over a fifteen-year stay in Italy were due more to lack of sufficient support from home than to any failings of generalship. Theodore Ayrault Dodge’s classic history, first published in 1891, is equally perceptive of Hannibal’s military prowess and his visionary character. Dodge followed Hannibal’s route from Carthage to Italy, paying particular attention to the famous crossing of the Alps, exploring every pass in order to determine Hannibal’s route. In this book, he wrote an entire history of the art of war among these two mighty armies. Hannibal remains unequaled as the most comprehensive and readable study of history’s greatest general.

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    Hannibal by Theodore Ayrault Dodge

    Hannibal

    20.3 hrs • 6/22/11 • Unabridged
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  13. 17.7 hrs • 3/14/2011 • Unabridged

    As private secretary to the emperor Hadrian, the scholar Suetonius had access to the imperial archives and used them (along with eyewitness accounts) to produce one of the most colorful biographical works in history. The Twelve Caesars chronicles the public careers and private lives of the men who wielded absolute power over Rome, from the foundation of the empire under Julius Caesar and Augustus, to the decline into depravity and civil war under Nero and the recovery that came with his successors. A masterpiece of observation, anecdote, and detailed physical description, The Twelve Caesars presents us with a gallery of vividly drawn—and all too human—individuals. This version of The Twelve Caesars is the translation by Alexander Thomson, MD.

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    The Twelve Caesars

    Translated by Alexander Thompson
    Read by Clive Chafer
    17.7 hrs • 3/14/11 • Unabridged
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  14. 0 reviews 0 5 3.5 3 out of 5 stars 3.5/5
    7.7 hrs • 10/19/2010 • Unabridged

    The Civil War is Julius Caesar’s personal account of his war with Pompey the Great—the war that destroyed the five-hundred-year-old Roman Republic. Caesar the victor became Caesar the dictator. In three short books, Caesar describes how, in order to defend his honor and the freedom of both himself and the Roman people, he marched on Rome and defeated the forces of Pompey and the Senate in Italy, Spain, and Greece. Julius Caesar himself was one of the most eminent writers of the age in which he lived. His “commentaries” offer a unique opportunity to read the victor’s version of events.

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    The Civil War by Julius Caesar

    The Civil War

    Translated by the Reverend F. P. Long, MA
    Read by Robin Field
    7.7 hrs • 10/19/10 • Unabridged
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    8.9 hrs • 9/7/2010 • Unabridged

    In 64 AD, on the night of July 19, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome’s great stadium, the Circus Maximus. The fire would spread over the coming days to engulf much of the city of Rome. From this calamity, one of the ancient world’s most devastating events, legends grew: that Nero had been responsible for the fire, and fiddled while Rome burned, and that Nero blamed the Christians of Rome, burning them alive in punishment, making them the first recorded martyrs to the Christian faith at Rome. The Great Fire of Rome opens at the beginning of 64 AD and follows the events in and around Rome as they unfold in the seven months leading up to the great fire. As the year progresses we learn that the infamous young emperor Nero, who was twenty-six at the time of the fire, is celebrating a decade in power. Yet the palace is far from complacent, and the streets of Rome are simmering with talk of revolt. Dando-Collins introduces the fascinating cavalcade of historical characters who were in Rome during the first seven months of 64 AD and played a part in the great drama. Using ancient sources, as well as modern archaeology, Dando-Collins describes the fire itself and its aftermath, as Nero personally directed relief efforts and reconstruction. The Great Fire of Rome is an unforgettable human drama that brings ancient Rome and the momentous events of 64 AD to scorching life.

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    The Great Fire of Rome by Stephen Dando-Collins

    The Great Fire of Rome

    8.9 hrs • 9/7/10 • Unabridged
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  16. 13.2 hrs • 7/20/2010 • Unabridged

    For fans of Victor Davis Hanson, Donald Kagan, and Barry Strauss comes a rich, sweeping account of the most imitated—and vicious—battle in history. Hannibal’s battle plan at Cannae became the mother of all great battle strategies—the first battle of encirclement that has been imitated (often to disastrous effect) endlessly over the past two thousand years. In this brilliant, long-overdue, and beautifully written account, Robert L. O’Connell gives listeners an epic account of one of the most dramatic battles of antiquity. The Ghosts of Cannae is at once a book about a specific battle (the massive defeat of a huge but inexperienced Roman army in southern Italy by Hannibal in 216 BC) but also an interpretation of the larger course of the Second Punic War, as well as an assessment of the historical impact of Rome’s storied rivalry with Carthage. What ties the book together is the fate of the survivors, their treatment by the authorities in Rome, and ultimately their vindication nearly two decades later, when they defeated Hannibal at the decisive battle of Zama in North Africa. With an unforgettable cast of heroes and villains, The Ghosts of Cannae is history at its finest.

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    The Ghosts of Cannae

    13.2 hrs • 7/20/10 • Unabridged
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