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  1. 1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
    16.6 hrs • 4/26/2016 • Unabridged

    The extraordinary true story of the rediscovery of the Mayan civilization. In the tradition of The Lost City of Z and Empire of Ice, comes the forgotten tale of 19th century American John Lloyd Stephens’s quest to uncover and understand the ancient world’s most advanced civilization amid the jungles of Central America. Imagine The Lost City of Z, except the fabled lost jungle civilization really was found—an “Egypt in the Americas” in which 1,500-year-old pyramids and temples were hidden in impenetrable tropical forests, along with evidence of astonishingly sophisticated art, writing, science, and culture. In 1839, when John Lloyd Stephens, a dashing U.S. special ambassador to Central America, and Frederick Catherwood, an acclaimed British architect and draftsman, set out into the unexplored jungles of the Yucatan, Charles Darwin was aboard the H.M.S. Beagle, the Bible was the basic template of history, and most people believed the world was less than 6,000 years old. Deep in the jungles, they stumbled upon the wondrous ruins of the Mayan civilization—an astonishing find that would change western understanding of human history. In Jungle of Stone, William Carlsen uncovers the rich history of the ruins as he follows Stephens and Catherwood’s journey through present day Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico. Drawing upon Stephens’s journals and Cather’s magnificent illustrations—which became the bestselling book Incidents of Travel in Yucatan—Carlsen artfully tells the enthralling story of two great voyagers and the world they discovered.

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    Jungle of Stone by William Carlsen

    Jungle of Stone

    16.6 hrs • 4/26/16 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
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  2. 8.7 hrs • 2/20/2016 • Unabridged

    This is the riveting true story of grave robbers who discovered and plundered Sipan Temple, and Dr. Walter Alva, the resourceful, strong-willed archaeologist who attempts to excavate the remains of the site while under siege by smugglers and collectors. Archaeology buffs as well as adventure novel listeners will delight in this true-crime thriller.

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    Lords of Sipan

    8.7 hrs • 2/20/16 • Unabridged
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  3. 2.6 hrs • 2/16/2016 • Unabridged

    In this exciting adventure mixed with amazing scientific discovery, a young, exuberant explorer and geoscientist journeys deep into the Amazon—where rivers boil and legends come to life. When Andrés Ruzo was just a small boy in Peru, his grandfather told him the story of a mysterious legend: there is a river, deep in the Amazon, which boils as if a fire burns below it. It was a story that would haunt Ruzo his entire childhood. Twenty years later, Ruzo—now a geoscientist—hears his aunt mention that she herself had visited this strange river. Determined to prove the river must be merely legend, Ruzo sets out on a journey deep into the Amazon. But what he finds astounds him: in this long, wide, and winding river, the waters run so hot that locals brew tea in them; small animals that fall in are instantly cooked. Over the next few years, Ruzo returns again and again, trying to uncover the secret. As he studies alongside the locals, including a shaman that acts as his mentor, Ruzo faces challenges more complex than he had ever imagined. The tangle of competing interests—locals, illegal cattle farmers, logging and oil companies, and government interests—all have a stake in this land where the waters run so hot. The Boiling River follows this young explorer as he navigates scientific, political, and personal obstacles. This true account reads like a modern-day adventure, complete with extraordinary characters, stunning vistas, captivating plot twists, and jaw-dropping details—including stunning photographs and never-before-published research about this incredible natural wonder. Ultimately, though, The Boiling River is about a man trying to understand his moral obligation to protect a sacred site from misuse, neglect, and even from his own discovery.

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    The Boiling River

    2.6 hrs • 2/16/16 • Unabridged
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  4. 8.6 hrs • 11/3/2015 • Unabridged

    Rooted in two vastly different cultures, a young man struggles to understand himself, find his place in the world, and reconnect with his mother—and her remote tribe in the deepest jungles of the Amazon rainforest—in this powerful memoir that combines adventure, history, and anthropology. “My Yanomami family called me by name. Anyopo-we. What it means, I soon learned, is ‘long way around’: I’d taken the long way around obstacles to be here among my people, back where I started. A twenty-year detour.” For much of his young life, David Good was torn between two vastly different worlds. The son of an American anthropologist and a tribeswoman from a distant part of the Amazon, it took him twenty years to embrace his identity, reunite with the mother who left him when he was six, and claim his heritage. The Way Around is Good’s amazing chronicle of self-discovery. Moving from the wilds of the Amazonian jungle to the paved confines of suburban New Jersey and back, it is the story of his parents, his American scientist-father, and his mother who could not fully adapt to the Western lifestyle. Good writes sympathetically about his mother’s abandonment and the deleterious effect it had on his young self; of his rebellious teenage years marked by depression and drinking, and the near-fatal car accident that transformed him and gave him purpose to find a way back to his mother. A compelling tale of recovery and discovery, The Way Around is a poignant, fascinating exploration of what family really means, and the way that the strongest bonds endure, even across decades and worlds.

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    The Way Around

    By David Good, with Daniel Paisner
    Read by David Good
    8.6 hrs • 11/3/15 • Unabridged
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  5. 13.4 hrs • 10/13/2015 • Unabridged

    When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile, in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. After the disaster, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales, and in The 33, he brings them to haunting, visceral life. We learn what it was like to be imprisoned inside a mountain, understand the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and experience the awe of working in such a place—underground passages filled with danger and that often felt alive. A masterwork of narrative journalism and a stirring testament to the power of the human spirit, The 33 captures the profound ways in which the lives of the Chilean miners and everyone involved in the catastrophe were forever changed.

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    The 33

    13.4 hrs • 10/13/15 • Unabridged
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  6. 9.5 hrs • 1/21/2015 • Unabridged

    Something Fierce tells the story of six-year-old Carmen Aguirre and her younger sister who fled Chile with their parents for Canada and a life in exile soon after the violent coup of September 11, 1973 that removed Salvador Allende—the democratically elected socialist president of Chile—from office. In 1978 when the Chilean resistance issued a call for exiled activists to return to Latin America, Carmen’s mother kept her precious girls with her. As their parents set up a safe house for resistance members in Bolivia, the girls’ own double lives began. And at eighteen, Carmen herself joined the resistance. This dramatic, darkly funny book covers the eventful decade from 1979 to 1989 and takes the reader inside war-ridden Peru, dictatorship-run Bolivia, post-Malvinas Argentina and Pinochet’s Chile. Writing with passion and deep personal insight, Aguirre captures her constant struggle to reconcile her commitment to the movement with the desires of her youth and her budding sexuality. Something Fierce is a gripping story of love, war, and resistance and a rare first-hand account of revolutionary life.

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    Something Fierce

    9.5 hrs • 1/21/15 • Unabridged
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  7. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    13.4 hrs • 10/7/2014 • Unabridged

    The exclusive, official story of the survival, faith, and family of Chile’s thirty-three trapped miners When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile, in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. The entire world watched what transpired above-ground during the grueling and protracted rescue, but the saga of the miners’ experiences below the earth’s surface—and the lives that led them there—has never been heard until now. For Deep Down Dark, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales. These thirty-three men came to think of the mine, a cavern inflicting constant and thundering aural torment, as a kind of coffin and as a church where they sought redemption through prayer. Even while still buried, they all agreed that, if by some miracle any of them escaped alive, they would share their story only collectively. Héctor Tobar was the person they chose to hear, and now to tell, that story. The result is a masterwork or narrative journalism—a riveting, at times shocking, emotionally textured account of a singular human event. Deep Down Dark brings to haunting, tactile life the experience of being imprisoned inside a mountain of stone, the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and the spiritual and mystical elements that surrounded working in such a dangerous place. In its stirring final chapters, it captures the profound way in which the lives of everyone involved in the disaster were forever changed.

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    Deep Down Dark

    13.4 hrs • 10/7/14 • Unabridged
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  8. 7.6 hrs • 5/1/2014 • Unabridged

    Soccer, football, the beautiful game—the world’s most popular sport goes by many names, but for decades, fans have agreed on one thing: the greatest player of all time was Pelé. Now the legendary star, ambassador, and humanitarian shares his story, experience, and his insights on the game for the very first time. Before Messi, before Ronaldo, before Beckham, there was Edson Arantes do Nascimento-known simply as Pelé. A national treasure, he created pure magic with his accomplishments on the field: an unprecedented three World Cup championships and the all-time scoring record, with 1,283 goals in his twenty-year career. Now, with the World Cup returning after more than sixty years to Brazil—the country often credited with perfecting the sport—soccer has a unique opportunity to encourage change on a global level. And as the tournament’s official ambassador, Pelé is ready to be the face of progress. For the first time ever, Pelé explores the recent history of the game and provides new insights into soccer’s role connecting and galvanizing players around the world. He has traveled the world as the global ambassador for soccer and in support of charitable organizations such as Unicef, promoting the positive influences soccer can have to transform young men and women, struggling communities, even entire nations. In groundbreaking detail and with unparalleled openness, he shares his most inspiring experiences, heartwarming stories and hard-won wisdom, and he puts the game in perspective. This is Pelé‘s legacy, his way of passing on everything he’s learned and inspiring a new generation. In Why Soccer Matters, Pelé details his ambitious goals for the future of the sport and, by extension, the world.

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    Why Soccer Matters

    Read by Sean Pratt
    7.6 hrs • 5/1/14 • Unabridged
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  9. 9.4 hrs • 9/3/2013 • Unabridged

    The companion book to the PBS documentary series Latino Americans chronicles the rich and varied history of Latinos who have helped shaped our nation and have become, with more than fifty million people, the largest minority in the United States. This companion to the landmark PBS miniseries vividly and candidly tells how the story of Latino Americans is the story of our country. Author and acclaimed journalist Ray Suarez explores the lives of Latino American men and women over a five-hundred-year span, encompassing an epic range of experiences from the early European settlements to Manifest Destiny; the Wild West to the Cold War; the Great Depression to globalization; and the Spanish-American War to the civil rights movement. Latino Americans shares the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and many others—individuals who have made an impact on history, as well as those whose extraordinary lives shed light on the times in which they lived and the legacy of this incredible American people.

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    Latino Americans

    9.4 hrs • 9/3/13 • Unabridged
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  10. 7.7 hrs • 7/2/2013 • Unabridged

    From Mitch Weiss and Kevin Maurer, the untold story of the capture of Che Guevara, one of the most feared revolutionaries of the late twentieth century. By the mid-1960s, Guevera had become famous for his outspoken criticism of the United States and his support for armed Communist insurgencies. He had been one of the architects of the Cuban Revolution, and was attempting to repeat his success throughout Latin America. His guerrilla tactics and talent for proselytizing made him a threat to American foreign policy—and when he turned his attention to Bolivia in 1967, the Pentagon made a decision: Che had to be eliminated. Major Ralph “Pappy” Shelton was called upon to lead the mission to train the Bolivians. With a hand-picked team of specialists, his first task was to transform a ragtag group of peasants into a trained fighting force who could also gather intelligence. Gary Prado, a Bolivian officer, volunteered to join the newly formed Bolivian Rangers. Joined by Felix Rodriguez, a Cuban exile working for the CIA, the Americans and Bolivians searched for Che. The size of Che’s group and when they would strike were unknowns, and the stakes were high. If Bolivia fell, it would validate Che’s theories and throw South America into turmoil. Hunting Che follows the exploits of Major Shelton, Felix Rodriguez, and Gary Prado—the Bolivian Ranger commander who ultimately captured him. The story begins with Che’s arrival in Bolivia and follows the hunt to the dramatic confrontation and capture of the iconic leader in the southeastern village of La Higuera. With the White House and the Pentagon secretly monitoring every move, Shelton and his team changed history, and prevented a catastrophic threat from taking root in the West.

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    Hunting Che

    7.7 hrs • 7/2/13 • Unabridged
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  11. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    10.7 hrs • 3/1/2013 • Unabridged

    Following in the footsteps of the greatest Spanish adventurers, Michael Wood retraces the path of the conquistadors from Amazonia to Lake Titicaca, and from the deserts of North Mexico to the heights of Machu Picchu. As he travels the same routes as Hernán Cortés, Francisco, and Gonzalo Pizarro, Wood describes the dramatic events that accompanied the epic sixteenth-century Spanish conquest of the Aztec and Inca empires. He also follows parts of Orellana’s extraordinary voyage of discovery down the Amazon and of Cabeza de Vaca’s arduous journey across America to the Pacific. Few stories in history match these conquests for sheer drama, endurance, and distances covered, and Wood’s gripping narrative brings them fully to life. Wood reconstructs both sides of the conquest, drawing from sources such as Bernal Diaz’s eyewitness account, Cortés’s own letters, and the Aztec texts recorded not long after the fall of Mexico. Wood’s evocative story of his own journey makes a compelling connection with the sixteenth-century world as he relates the present-day customs, rituals, and oral traditions of the people he meets. He offers powerful descriptions of the rivers, mountains, and ruins he encounters on his trip, comparing what he has seen and experienced with the historical record. As well as being one of the pivotal events in history, the Spanish conquest of the Americas was one of the most cruel and devastating. Wood grapples with the moral legacy of the European invasion and with the implications of an episode in history that swept away civilizations, religions, and ways of life. The stories in Conquistadors are not only of conquest, heroism, and greed but of changes in the way we see the world, history and civilization, justice and human rights.

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    Conquistadors by Michael Wood

    Conquistadors

    10.7 hrs • 3/1/13 • Unabridged
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  12. 9.9 hrs • 2/5/2013 • Unabridged

    Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid—as leaders of the Wild Bunch, they planned and executed the most daring bank and train robberies of the day, with a professionalism never before seen by authorities. For several years at the end of the 1890s, the two friends, along with a revolving cast who made up their band of thieves, eluded local law enforcement and bounty hunters, all while stealing from the rich bankers and eastern railroad corporations who exploited western land. The close calls were many, but Butch and Sundance always managed to escape to rob again another day—that is, until they rode headlong into the twentieth century. Fenced-in range, telephone lines, electric lights, and new crime-fighting techniques were quickly rendering obsolete the outlaws of the wide open frontier. Knowing their time was up, Butch and Sundance, along with a mysterious beauty named Etta Place, headed to South America, vowing to leave their criminal careers behind. But riding the trails of Chile, Argentina, and Bolivia, Butch and Sundance would find that crime wasn’t through with them just yet. In The Last Outlaws, Thom Hatch brings these memorable characters to life like never before: Butch, the brains of the outfit; Sundance, the man of action; and the men on both sides of the law whom they fought with and against. From their early holdup attempts to that fateful day in Bolivia, Hatch draws on a wealth of fresh research to go beyond the myth and provide a compelling new look at these legends of the Wild West.

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    The Last Outlaws

    9.9 hrs • 2/5/13 • Unabridged
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  13. 1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
    12.8 hrs • 11/6/2012 • Unabridged

    Our 1846 war with Mexico was a blatant land grab provoked by President James Polk. And while it secured the entire Southwest and California for America, it also exacerbated regional tensions over slavery, created the first significant antiwar movement in America, and helped lead the nation into civil war. A Wicked War is the definitive history of this conflict that turned America into a continental power. Amy Greenberg describes the battles between American and Mexican armies but also delineates the political battles between Democrats and Whigs—the former led by the ruthless Polk, the latter by the charismatic Henry Clay and a young representative from Illinois named Abraham Lincoln, who initially drew national attention as a critic of the war. Greenberg brilliantly recounts this key chapter in the creation of the United States, evoking time, place, event, and personality with equal parts authority and narrative flair.

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    A Wicked War

    12.8 hrs • 11/6/12 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
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  14. 10.2 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    What happens when an unadventurous adventure writer tries to re-create the original expedition to Machu Picchu? In this fascinating travelogue, Mark Adams follows in the controversial footsteps of Hiram Bingham III, who’s been both lionized and vilified for his discovery of the famed Lost City—but which reputation is justified? In 1911, Bingham climbed into the Andes Mountains of Peru and “discovered” Machu Picchu. History has recast Bingham as a villain who stole both priceless artifacts and credit for finding the great archeological site, but Adams set out to retrace the explorer’s perilous path in search of the truth—except he’d written about adventure far more than he’d actually lived it. In fact, he’d never even slept in a tent. Turn Right at Machu Picchu is Adams’ fascinating and funny account of his journey through some of the world’s most majestic, historic, and remote landscapes guided only by a hard-as-nails Australian survivalist and one nagging question: Just what was Machu Picchu?

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    Turn Right at Machu Picchu

    10.2 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  15. 8.1 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Abridged

    On February 13, 2003, a plane carrying three American civilian contractors—Marc Gonsalves, Keith Stansell, and Tom Howes—crash-landed in the mountainous jungle of Colombia. Dazed and shaken, they emerged from the plane bloodied and injured as gunfire rained down around them. As of that moment they were prisoners of the FARC, a Colombian terrorist and Marxist rebel organization. In an instant they had become American captives in Colombia’s volatile and ongoing conflict, which has lasted for almost fifty years. In Out of Captivity, Gonsalves, Stansell, and Howes recount their amazing tale of survival, friendship, and, ultimately, rescue, tracing their five and a half years as hostages of the FARC. Their story takes you inside one of the world’s most notorious terrorist organizations, going behind enemy lines with vivid and haunting imagery. Their words conjure a reality that few people have ever encountered—from sleeping on beds literally carved out of the jungle to escaping Colombian military air strikes under the cover of darkness to being bound with steel chains by their captors. Describing backbreaking starvation marches and forced isolation, the authors chronicle their confrontations and interactions with the FARC guerrilla soldiers—a motley crew of brainwashed, idealistic teenagers and seasoned veterans who’ve been around long enough to realize that the only way out of the FARC is in a body bag. Though the physical punishments their bodies endured were unrelenting, the psychological battles they waged were the ultimate test of their resolve. With candid detail, Gonsalves, Stansell, and Howes relate the perilous mental struggles they each experienced, as they grappled with feelings of guilt, fear, and anxiety for the families and lives they’d left behind. Exposing the transformative power of captivity, they show how they turned these fears into strengths, using their memories and their families, their pasts and their futures, to motivate them in their quest for survival. Despite the odds and the conditions, despite the chains and the silence, and despite the often tense relationships they experienced with their fellow Colombian hostages, they had one another, forging a bond that allowed them to cope with the horrific conditions of their confinement. This brotherhood enabled them to persevere through the worst that the FARC threw at them, always reminding them of their ultimate goal: freedom. A harrowing account of one of the longest civilian hostage crises in United States history, Out of Captivity is a remarkable and compelling exploration of how far three Americans were willing to go as they fought to stay alive for themselves, their families, and one another.

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  16. 5.4 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Abridged

    "Home will be the open sky... each guerrilla fighter is ready to die not just to defend an idea, but to make that idea a reality." Che Guevara remains one of the world's most iconic political and revolutionary figures. Fascinating to admirers and adversaries alike, he captured the minds of millions with his leadership and his belief in guerrilla warfare as the only effective agent to achieve political change. Here, in his own classic text on revolution, Che draws on his first-hand experience of the Cuban campaign to document all aspects of guerrilla warfare, from its aims to its organization and training. He analyses how in Cuba, against all odds, a small band of dedicated fighters grew in strength with the support of the people to defeat a dictator's army.

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