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Military

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  1. 9.9 hrs • 9/27/2016 • Unabridged

    A recently discovered account of an Austrian Jewish writer’s flight, persecution, and clandestine life in wartime France. As arts editor for one of Vienna’s principal newspapers, Moriz Scheyer knew many of the city’s foremost artists, and was an important literary journalist. With the advent of the Nazis he was forced from both job and home. In 1943, in hiding in France, Scheyer began drafting what was to become this book. Tracing events from the Anschluss in Vienna, through life in Paris and unoccupied France, including a period in a French concentration camp, contact with the Resistance, and clandestine life in a convent caring for mentally disabled women, he gives an extraordinarily vivid account of the events and experience of persecution. After Scheyer’s death in 1949, his stepson, disliking the book’s anti-German rhetoric, destroyed the manuscript. Or thought he did. Recently, a carbon copy was found in the family’s attic by P. N. Singer, Scheyer’s step-grandson, who has translated and provided an epilogue.

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    Asylum

    Translated and with an epilogue by P. N. Singer
    9.9 hrs • 9/27/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 10.2 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    From New York Times bestselling author of Destiny of the Republic, a thrilling narrative of Winston Churchill’s extraordinary and little-known exploits during the Boer War. At age twenty-four, Winston Churchill was utterly convinced it was his destiny to become prime minister of England one day, despite the fact he had just lost his first election campaign for parliament. He believed that to achieve his goal he must do something spectacular on the battlefield. Despite deliberately putting himself in extreme danger as a British Army officer in colonial wars in India and Sudan, and as a journalist covering a Cuban uprising against the Spanish, glory and fame had eluded him. Churchill arrived in South Africa in 1899, valet and crates of vintage wine in tow, there to cover the brutal colonial war the British were fighting with Boer rebels. But just two weeks after his arrival, the soldiers he was accompanying on an armored train were ambushed, and Churchill was taken prisoner. Remarkably, he pulled off a daring escape—but then had to traverse hundreds of miles of enemy territory, alone, with nothing but a crumpled wad of cash, four slabs of chocolate, and his wits to guide him. The story of his escape is incredible enough, but then Churchill enlisted, returned to South Africa, fought in several battles, and ultimately liberated the men with whom he had been imprisoned. Churchill would later remark that this period, “could I have seen my future, was to lay the foundations of my later life.” Millard spins an epic story of bravery, savagery, and chance encounters with a cast of historical characters—including Rudyard Kipling, Lord Kitchener, and Mohandas Gandhi—with whom he would later share the world stage. But Hero of the Empire is more than an adventure story, for the lessons Churchill took from Boer War would profoundly affect twentieth century history.

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    Hero of the Empire

    10.2 hrs • 9/20/16 • Unabridged
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  3. 52.8 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    The Civil War: A Narrative, Vol. 2 continues one of the most remarkable works of history ever fashioned. Focusing on the pivotal year of 1863, the second volume in Shelby Foote’s masterful narrative history brings to life some of the most dramatic and important moments in the Civil War, including the Battle of Gettysburg and Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign. The word narrative is the key to this book’s extraordinary incandescence and truth: the story is told entirely from the point of view of the people involved. One learns not only what was happening on all fronts but also how the author discovered it during his years of exhaustive research. This is a must-listen for anyone interested in one of the bloodiest wars in America’s history.

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    The Civil War: A Narrative, Vol. 2 by Shelby Foote

    The Civil War: A Narrative, Vol. 2

    52.8 hrs • 9/20/16 • Unabridged
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  4. 15.7 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    Did I do that?! When asked to name a successor, Alexander the Great declared that his empire should go “to the strongest.” But would rival factions have descended into war if he’d been a little more specific? What if the Vienna School of Art took a chance on a hopeful young student named Adolf Hitler? If Pope Clement VII granted King Henry VIII an annulment, England would likely still be Catholic today—and so would America. Bill Fawcett, author of 100 Mistakes That Changed History, offers a compendium of 101 all-new mammoth mistakes—from the ill-fated rule of Emperor Darius III to the equally ill-fated search for WMDs in Iraq—that will, unfortunately, never be forgotten by history.

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    101 Stumbles in the March of History by Bill Fawcett

    101 Stumbles in the March of History

    15.7 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
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  5. 1.7 hrs • 8/31/2016 • Unabridged

    The Art of War was written in the sixth century BC by the high-ranking military general and strategist Sun Tzu. Though it is most commonly known as an ancient Chinese military treatise, The Art of War has become more versatile and is currently being used worldwide in business management.

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    The Art of War

    1.7 hrs • 8/31/16 • Unabridged
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  6. 11.1 hrs • 8/23/2016 • Unabridged

    With a Foreword by Bill O’Reilly, here is the incredible memoir of a former Marine who returns to combat in Iraq and Afghanistan three decades after leaving the Corps. Terry McGowan had been a beat cop, a Marine captain, and a special agent for the FBI before retiring at the age of fifty. But when tragedy struck the United States on September 11, 2001, Terry felt an undiminished sense of duty to protect and serve his country. Six years later, he was in Iraq as a member of a team of high-ranking retired and active-duty military working for the highest level of Marine military intelligence. His success in Iraq led to a position as a Law Enforcement Professional with the Marines in Afghanistan. There he found himself the oldest member of a platoon on the front line; a platoon that was under strength and under fire. While an eighteen-year-old Marine can’t look at a crowd of Afghans and pick out the guilty party, with his years of experience in law enforcement, Terry had developed an eye for the “felony look.” His training as a Marine officer combined with his experience as an FBI agent made him a unique asset as he struggled to keep up with young Marines while they humped over the mountains. In The Silence of War, Terry recounts the many trials of his life of service, providing an intimate glimpse into the horrible realities of modern military conflict.

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    The Silence of War

    Foreword by Bill O’Reilly
    Read by Pete Larkin
    11.1 hrs • 8/23/16 • Unabridged
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  7. 9.8 hrs • 8/23/2016 • Unabridged

    On a cold, moonlit night in January 1944, Anne-Marie Walters, just twenty years old, parachuted into southwest France to work with the Resistance in preparation for the long-awaited Allied invasion. The daughter of a British father and a French mother, she was to act as a courier for George Starr, head of the “Wheelwright” circuit of the Special Operations Executive. Over the next seven months, Walters crisscrossed the region, carrying messages, delivering explosives, arranging the escape of downed airmen, and receiving parachute drops of arms and personnel in the dead of night—living in constant fear of capture and torture by the Gestapo. Then, on the very eve of liberation, she was sent off on foot over the Pyrenees to Spain, carrying urgent dispatches for London. Anne-Marie Walters wrote Moondrop to Gascony immediately after the war, while the events were still vivid in her mind. It is a tale of high adventure, comradeship and kindness, of betrayals and appalling atrocities, and of the often unremarked courage of many ordinary French men and women who risked their lives to help drive German armies from French soil. And through it all shines her’s quiet courage, a keen sense of humor and, above all, her pure zest for life. For this new edition, David Hewson, a former regular-army officer interested in military history, adds biographical details for the main characters, identifies the real people behind the code names, and provides background information. He also tells about Anne-Marie Walters’ early life and what happened to her in the postwar years.

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    Moondrop to Gascony by Anne-Marie Walters

    Moondrop to Gascony

    Introduction and postscript by David Hewson
    9.8 hrs • 8/23/16 • Unabridged
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  8. 10.0 hrs • 8/23/2016 • Unabridged

    The daring behind-Nazi-lines rescue of priceless pedigree horses by American soldiers in the closing days of World War Two—a riveting equine adventure story from the author of The Eighty-Dollar Champion. While Hitler’s attempt to create an Aryan master race is well known, his simultaneous effort to build an equine master race made up of the finest purebred horses is not. Hidden on a secret farm in Czechoslovakia, these beautiful animals were suddenly imperiled in the spring of 1945 as the Russians closed in on the Third Reich from the east and the Allies attacked from the west. Thanks to the daring of an American colonel, an Austrian Olympian in charge of the famous Lipizzaner stallions, and the support of US General George Patton, a covert mission was planned to kidnap these endangered animals and smuggle them into safe territory—though many disapproved of risking human lives to save mere horses.

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    The Perfect Horse by Elizabeth Letts

    The Perfect Horse

    10.0 hrs • 8/23/16 • Unabridged
    CD
  9. 12.8 hrs • 8/23/2016 • Unabridged

    From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Eighty-Dollar Champion comes the riveting true story of the valiant rescue of priceless pedigree horses in the last days of World War II. As the Russians closed in on Hitler from the east and the Allies attacked from the west, American soldiers discovered a secret Nazi effort to engineer a master race of the finest purebred horses. With the support of U.S. general George S. Patton, a passionate equestrian, the Americans planned an audacious mission to kidnap these beautiful animals and smuggle them into safe territory—assisted by a daring Austrian colonel who was both a former Olympian and a trainer of the famous Lipizzaner stallions.

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    The Perfect Horse

    12.8 hrs • 8/23/16 • Unabridged
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  10. 10.1 hrs • 8/16/2016 • Unabridged

    The legend was forged in the fires of World War II, when special units of elite navy frogmen were entrusted with dangerous covert missions. These Underwater Demolition Teams, as they were then called, soon became known for their toughness and fearlessness, and their remarkable ability to get the job—any job—done. Years later, the renamed US Navy SEALs (for sea, air, and land) continued to be a wartime force to be reckoned with throughout the remainder of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. They served as rangers and scouts in the jungles of Vietnam, answered the call to duty in Panama, Granada, and in Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, while developing into the very best of the best, the cream of America’s Special Forces crop.

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    Brave Men Dark Waters

    10.1 hrs • 8/16/16 • Unabridged
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  11. 24.0 hrs • 8/16/2016 • Unabridged

    A stunning account of how the American military’s breaking of the Japanese diplomatic Purple codes led to the defeat of Nazi Germany. Bruce Lee, having had access to more than one million pages of US Army documents and thousands of pages of daily top-secret messages dispatched to Tokyo from the Japanese embassy in Berlin, assembles fascinating revelations about pivotal moments in the war, including the reason Eisenhower stopped his army at the Elbe and let the Russians capture Berlin, the invasion of Europe, and the battles on the African and Eastern fronts. This groundbreaking book clearly demonstrates how the success of the American code-breakers led to so many favorable military and strategic outcomes for the Allies and hastened the end of this devastating war.

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    Marching Orders

    24.0 hrs • 8/16/16 • Unabridged
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  12. 11.2 hrs • 8/15/2016 • Unabridged

    Told from multiple points of view—including James and Dolley Madison and a British admiral—this is the true story of the burning of the White House in 1814. It’s unimaginable today, even for a generation that saw the Twin Towers fall and the Pentagon attacked. It’s unimaginable because in 1814, enemies didn’t fly overhead; they marched through the streets, and for twenty-six hours in August, the British enemy marched through Washington, DC, and set fire to government buildings, including the US Capitol and the White House. Relying on firsthand accounts, historian Jane Hampton Cook weaves together several different narratives to create a vivid, multidimensional account of the burning of Washington, including the escalation that led to it and the immediate aftermath. From James and Dolley Madison to the British admiral who ordered the White House set aflame, historical figures are brought to life through their experience of this unprecedented attack. The Burning of the White House is the story of a city invaded, a presidential family displaced, a nation humbled, and an American spirit that somehow remained unbroken.

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    The Burning of the White House by Jane Hampton Cook

    The Burning of the White House

    11.2 hrs • 8/15/16 • Unabridged
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  13. 8.9 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    In late 1945 the fate of Adolf Hitler was a complete mystery. Missing for four months, he had simply vanished. Hugh Trevor-Roper, a British intelligence officer, was given the task of solving the mystery. With access to American counterintelligence files and German prisoners, his brilliant detective work proved finally that Hitler had killed himself in Berlin. It also produced one of the most fascinating history books ever written. Originally published in 1947, The Last Days of Hitler tells the extraordinary story of those final days of the Thousand-Year Reich—a dramatic, carefully planned finale to a terrible chapter of history.

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    The Last Days of Hitler, 7th Edition by Hugh Trevor-Roper
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  14. 10.9 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    A gripping exploration of the fall of Constantinople and its connection to the world we live in today, 1453 tells the story of one of the great forgotten events of world history, the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. For a thousand years Constantinople was quite simply the city: fabulously wealthy, imperial, intimidating—and Christian. Single-handedly it blunted early Arab enthusiasm for Holy War; when a second wave of Islamic warriors swept out of the Asian steppes in the Middle Ages, Constantinople was the ultimate prize: “The Red Apple.” It was a city that had always lived under threat. On average it had survived a siege every forty years for a millenium—until the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II, twenty-one years old and hungry for glory, rode up to the walls in April 1453 with a huge army, “numberless as the stars.” Here is the taut, vivid story of this final struggle for the city told largely through the accounts of eyewitnesses. For fifty-five days a tiny group of defenders defied the huge Ottoman army in a seesawing contest fought on land, at sea, and underground. During the course of events, the largest cannon ever built was directed against the world’s most formidable defensive system, Ottoman ships were hauled overland into the Golden Horn, and the morale of defenders was crucially undermined by unnerving portents. At the center is the contest between two inspirational leaders, Mehmed II and Constantine XI, fighting for empire and religious faith, and an astonishing finale in a few short hours on May 29, 1453—a defining moment for medieval history.

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    1453

    10.9 hrs • 8/9/16 • Unabridged
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  15. 15.8 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    No espionage missions have been kept more secret than those involving American submarines. Now, Blind Man’s Bluff shows for the first time how the Navy sent submarines wired with self-destruct charges into the heart of Soviet seas to tap crucial underwater telephone cables. It unveils how the Navy’s own negligence might have been responsible for the loss of the USS Scorpion, a submarine that disappeared, all hands lost, thirty years ago. It tells the complete story of the audacious attempt to steal a Soviet submarine with the help of eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, and how it was doomed from the start. And it reveals how the Navy used the comforting notion of deep sea rescue vehicles to hide operations that were more James Bond than Jacques Cousteau. Blind Man’s Bluff contains an unforgettable array of characters, including the cowboy sub commander who brazenly outraced torpedoes and couldn’t resist sneaking up to within feet of unaware enemy subs. It takes us inside clandestine Washington meetings where top submarine captains briefed presidents and where the espionage war was planned one sub and one dangerous encounter at a time. Stretching from the years immediately after World War II to the present-day operations of the Clinton Administration, it is an epic story of daring and deception. A magnificent achievement in investigative reporting, it feels like a spy thriller, but with one important difference—everything in it is true.

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    Blind Man's Bluff

    15.8 hrs • 8/9/16 • Unabridged
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  16. 13.1 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    The first serious book to examine what happens when the ancient boundary between war and peace is erased. Once, war was a temporary state of affairs—a violent but brief interlude between times of peace. Today, America’s wars are everywhere and forever: our enemies change constantly and rarely wear uniforms, and virtually anything can become a weapon. As war expands, so does the role of the US military. Today, military personnel don’t just “kill people and break stuff.” Instead, they analyze computer code, train Afghan judges, build Ebola isolation wards, eavesdrop on electronic communications, develop soap operas, and patrol for pirates. You name it, the military does it. Rosa Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war from an unconventional perspective—that of a former top Pentagon official who is the daughter of two anti-war protesters and a human rights activist married to an Army Green Beret. Her experiences lead her to an urgent warning: When the boundaries around war disappear, we risk destroying America’s founding values and the laws and institutions we’ve built—and undermining the international rules and organizations that keep our world from sliding towards chaos. If Russia and China have recently grown bolder in their foreign adventures, it’s no accident; US precedents have paved the way for the increasingly unconstrained use of military power by states around the globe. Meanwhile, we continue to pile new tasks onto the military, making it increasingly ill-prepared for the threats America will face in the years to come. By turns a memoir, a work of journalism, a scholarly exploration into history, anthropology and law, and a rallying cry, How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything transforms the familiar into the alien, showing us that the culture we inhabit is reshaping us in ways we may suspect, but don’t really understand. It’s the kind of book that will leave you moved, astonished, and profoundly disturbed, for the world around us is quietly changing beyond recognition—and time is running out to make things right.

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