15 Results for:

North America

  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 15 of 15
  1. 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    After being sworn in as president, Richard Nixon told the assembled crowd that “government will listen … Those who have been left out, we will try to bring in.” But that same day, he obliterated those pledges of greater citizen control of government by signing National Security Decision Memorandum 2, a document that made sweeping changes to the national security power structure. Nixon’s signature erased the influence that the Departments of State and Defense, as well as the CIA, had over Vietnam and the course of the Cold War. The new structure put Nixon at the center, surrounded by loyal aides and a new national security adviser, Henry Kissinger, who coordinated policy through the National Security Council under Nixon’s command. Using years of research and revelations from newly released documents, USA Today reporter Ray Locker upends much of the conventional wisdom about the Nixon administration and its impact and shows how the creation of this secret, unprecedented, extraconstitutional government undermined US policy and values. In doing so, Nixon sowed the seeds of his own destruction by creating a climate of secrecy, paranoia, and reprisal that still affects Washington today.

    Available Formats: CD, MP3 CD

    Nixon’s Gamble

    9/20/16 • Unabridged
    CD
    Also: MP3 CD
  2. 9.7 hrs • 8/16/2016 • Unabridged

    In this breathtaking cultural history filled with exclusive, never-before-revealed details, celebrated rock journalist Joel Selvin tells the definitive story of the Rolling Stones’ infamous Altamont concert in San Francisco, the disastrous historic event that marked the end of the idealistic 1960s. In the annals of rock history, the Altamont Speedway Free Festival on December 6, 1969, has long been seen as the distorted twin of Woodstock—the day that shattered the Sixties’ promise of peace and love when a concertgoer was killed by a member of the Hells Angels, the notorious biker club acting as security. While most people know of the events from the film Gimme Shelter, the whole story has remained buried in varied accounts, rumor, and myth—until now. Altamont explores rock’s darkest day, a fiasco that began well before the climactic death of Meredith Hunter and continued beyond that infamous December night. Joel Selvin probes every aspect of the show—from the Stones’ hastily planned tour preceding the concert to the bad acid that swept through the audience to other deaths that also occurred that evening—to capture the full scope of the tragedy and its aftermath. He also provides an in-depth look at the Grateful Dead’s role in the events leading to Altamont, examining the band’s behind-the-scenes presence in both arranging the show and hiring the Hells Angels as security. The product of twenty years of exhaustive research and dozens of interviews with many key players, including medical staff, Hells Angels members, the stage crew, and the musicians who were there, Altamont is the ultimate account of the final event in rock’s formative and most turbulent decade.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Altamont by Joel Selvin

    Altamont

    9.7 hrs • 8/16/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  3. 13.7 hrs • 6/27/2016 • Unabridged

    The prize-winning historian's fresh look at the people and events that decided America's struggle for independence. Its suspenseful climax is the 500-mile march undertaken by General Washington to surround Cornwallis at Yorktown.

    Available Formats: Download

    The First Salute

    13.7 hrs • 6/27/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  4. 8.5 hrs • 5/18/2015 • Unabridged

    Fought on July 28, 1864, the Battle of Ezra Church was a dramatic engagement during the Civil War’s Atlanta campaign. Confederate forces under John Bell Hood desperately fought to stop William T. Sherman’s advancing armies as they tried to cut the last Confederate supply line into the city. Confederates under General Stephen D. Lee nearly overwhelmed the Union right flank, but Federals under General Oliver O. Howard decisively repelled every attack. After five hours of struggle, 5,000 Confederates lay dead and wounded, while only 632 Federals were lost. The result was another major step in Sherman’s long effort to take Atlanta. Detailing Stephen D. Lee’s tactical missteps and Howard’s vigilant leadership, Hess challenges many common misconceptions about the battle. Richly narrated and drawn from an array of unpublished manuscripts and firsthand accounts, Hess’ work sheds new light on the complexities and significance of this important engagement, both on and off the battlefield.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    The Battle of Ezra Church and the Struggle for Atlanta by Earl J. Hess
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  5. 10.3 hrs • 11/18/2014 • Unabridged

    Acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans actively resisted expansion of the United States empire for centuries. Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the United States settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture and in the highest offices of government and the military. Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

    Available Formats: Download
    Download
  6. 10.0 hrs • 8/12/2014 • Unabridged

    A riveting portrait of the gold rush, by the award-winning author of Down the Great Unknown and The Forger’s Spell In the spring of 1848, rumors began to spread that gold had been discovered in a remote spot in the Sacramento Valley. A year later, newspaper headlines declared “Gold Fever!” as hundreds of thousands of men and women borrowed money, quit their jobs, and allowed themselves—for the first time ever—to imagine a future of ease and splendor. In The Rush, Edward Dolnick brilliantly recounts their treacherous westward journeys by wagon and on foot and takes us to the frenzied gold fields and the rowdy cities that sprang from nothing to jam-packed chaos. With an enthralling cast of characters and scenes of unimaginable wealth and desperate ruin, The Rush is a fascinating—and rollicking—account of the greatest treasure hunt the world has ever seen.

    Available Formats: Download
    The Rush by Edward Dolnick

    The Rush

    10.0 hrs • 8/12/14 • Unabridged
    Download
  7. 8.1 hrs • 10/8/2013 • Unabridged

    Greatly expanding on his blockbuster 1421, distinguished historian Gavin Menzies uncovers the complete untold history of how mankind came to the Americas—offering new revelations and a radical rethinking of the accepted historical record in Who Discovered America? The iconoclastic historian’s magnum opus, Who Discovered America? calls into question our understanding of how the American continents were settled, shedding new light on the well-known “discoveries” of European explorers, including Christopher Columbus. In Who Discovered America? he combines meticulous research and an adventurer’s spirit to reveal astounding new evidence of an ancient Asian seagoing tradition—most notably the Chinese—that dates as far back as 130,000 years ago. Menzies offers a revolutionary new alternative to the “Beringia” theory of how humans crossed a land bridge connecting Asia and North America during the last Ice Age, and provides a wealth of staggering claims, that hold fascinating and astonishing implications for the history of mankind.

    Available Formats: Download

    Who Discovered America?

    8.1 hrs • 10/8/13 • Unabridged
    Download
  8. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    26.2 hrs • 8/13/2013 • Unabridged

    Bernard Bailyn gives us a compelling, fresh account of the first great transit of people from Britain, Europe, and Africa to British North America, their involvements with each other, and their struggles with the indigenous peoples of the eastern seaboard. The immigrants were a mixed multitude. They came from England, the Netherlands, the German and Italian states, France, Africa, Sweden, and Finland, and they moved to the western hemisphere for different reasons, from different social backgrounds and cultures. They represented a spectrum of religious attachments. In the early years, their stories are not mainly of triumph but of confusion, failure, violence, and the loss of civility as they sought to normalize situations and recapture lost worlds. It was a thoroughly brutal encounter—not only between the Europeans and native peoples and between Europeans and Africans but among Europeans themselves, as they sought to control and prosper in the new configurations of life that were emerging around them.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Barbarous Years

    26.2 hrs • 8/13/13 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    Download
  9. 18.2 hrs • 10/1/2011 • Unabridged

    From the author of the Magellan biography, Over the Edge of the World, comes a mesmerizing new account of the great explorer. Christopher Columbus’s 1492 voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in search of a trading route to China, and his unexpected landfall in the Americas, is a watershed event in world history. Yet Columbus made three more voyages within the span of only a decade, each designed to demonstrate that he could sail to China within a matter of weeks and convert those he found there to Christianity. These later voyages were even more adventurous, violent, and ambiguous, but they revealed Columbus’s uncanny sense of the sea, his mingled brilliance and delusion, and his superb navigational skills. In all these exploits he almost never lost a sailor. By their conclusion, however, Columbus was broken in body and spirit. If the first voyage illustrates the rewards of exploration, the latter voyages illustrate the tragic costs—political, moral, and economic. In rich detail Laurence Bergreen recreates each of these adventures as well as the historical background of Columbus’s celebrated, controversial career. Written from the participants’ vivid perspectives, this breathtakingly dramatic account will be embraced by readers of Bergreen’s previous biographies of Marco Polo and Magellan and by fans of Nathaniel Philbrick, Simon Winchester, and Tony Horwitz.

    Available Formats: Download

    Columbus

    18.2 hrs • 10/1/11 • Unabridged
    Download
  10. 10.2 hrs • 10/19/2010 • Unabridged

    A riveting narrative look at one of the most colorful, dangerous, and peculiar places in America’s historical landscape: the strange, wonderful, and mysterious Mississippi River of the nineteenth century. Beginning in the early 1800s and climaxing with the siege of Vicksburg in 1863, Wicked River brings to life a place where river pirates brushed elbows with future presidents and religious visionaries shared passage with thieves. Here is a minute-by-minute account of Natchez being flattened by a tornado; the St. Louis harbor being crushed by a massive ice floe; hidden, nefarious celebrations of Mardi Gras; and the sinking of the Sultana, the worst naval disaster in American history. Here, too, is the Mississippi itself: gorgeous, perilous, and unpredictable. Masterfully told, Wicked River is an exuberant work of Americana that portrays a forgotten society on the edge of revolutionary change.

    Available Formats: Download

    Wicked River

    10.2 hrs • 10/19/10 • Unabridged
    Download
  11. 16.9 hrs • 8/24/2010 • Unabridged

    This is the fascinating story of the French regime in Canada. Few periods in the history of North America can equal it for romance and color, drama and suspense, great human courage and far-seeing aspiration. Costain, who writes history in the terms of the people who lived it, wrote of this book: “Almost from the first I found myself caught in the spell of these courageous, colorful, cruel days. But whenever I found myself guilty of overstressing the romantic side of the picture and forgetful of the more prosaic life beneath, I tried to balance the scales more properly. [This] is…a conscientious effort at a balanced picture of a period which was brave, bizarre, fanatical, lyrical, lusty, and, in fact, rather completely unbalanced.”

    Available Formats: Download

    The White and the Gold

    16.9 hrs • 8/24/10 • Unabridged
    Download
  12. 18.3 hrs • 4/13/2010 • Unabridged

    At the end of 1618, a blazing green star soared across the night sky over the northern hemisphere. From the Philippines to the Arctic, the comet became a sensation and a symbol, a warning of doom or a promise of salvation. Two years later, as the Pilgrims prepared to sail across the Atlantic on board the Mayflower, the atmosphere remained charged with fear and expectation. Men and women readied themselves for war, pestilence, or divine retribution. Against this background, and amid deep economic depression, the Pilgrims conceived their enterprise of exile. Within a decade, despite crisis and catastrophe, they built a thriving settlement at New Plymouth, based on beaver fur, corn, and cattle. In doing so, they laid the foundations for Massachusetts, New England, and a new nation. Using a wealth of new evidence from landscape, archaeology, and hundreds of overlooked or neglected documents, Nick Bunker gives a vivid and strikingly original account of the Mayflower project and the first decade of the Plymouth Colony. From mercantile London and the rural England of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I to the mountains and rivers of Maine, he weaves a rich narrative that combines religion, politics, money, science, and the sea. The Pilgrims were entrepreneurs as well as evangelicals, political radicals as well as Christian idealists. Making Haste from Babylon tells their story in unrivaled depth, from their roots in religious conflict and village strife at home to their final creation of a permanent foothold in America.

    Available Formats: Download

    Making Haste from Babylon

    18.3 hrs • 4/13/10 • Unabridged
    Download
  13. 10.3 hrs • 10/14/2008 • Abridged

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Washington's Crossing offers a sweeping, enthralling biography as dramatic and exciting as the life it portrays. Soldier, spy, master mariner, explorer, cartographer, artist, and Father of New France, the remarkable Samuel de Champlain comes to life in acclaimed historian David Hackett Fischer's Champlain's Dream. Born on France's Atlantic coast, Champlain fought in France's religious wars for the great Henri IV, with whom he shared religious tolerance in an age of murderous sectarianism. He was also a brilliant navigator, never losing a ship in 27 Atlantic crossings. But we remember Champlain mainly as a great explorer. On foot and by ship and canoe he traveled through what are now six Canadian provinces and five American states, where he founded, colonized, and administered French settlements in North America. Despite much resistance and many defeats, Champlain's astonishing dedication and stamina finally established France's New World colony. He tried constantly to maintain peace among Indian nations, but when he had to take up arms he forcefully imposed a new balance of power, proving himself a formidable strategist and warrior. Throughout his three decades in North America, Champlain remained committed to a remarkable Grand Design for France's colony. A leader who dreamed of humanity and peace in a world of cruelty and violence, he was a true visionary, especially when compared to his English and Spanish contemporaries.

    Available Formats: Download

    Champlain's Dream

    10.3 hrs • 10/14/08 • Abridged
    Download
  14. 1.2 hrs • 10/25/2007 • Unabridged

    The Declaration of Independence set forth the principles for America by British Americans, led by Thomas Jefferson, John Adam, George Washington, and Benjamin Franklin. This document formed the foundation of all that followed in American life, from the Constitution and Bill of Rights to the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address. Its principle that all men are created equal served as the foundation of broadening all rights from blacks during the Civil War to women with right to vote in the early twentieth century, to people of all races, creeds, and colors. The concept of the pursuit of happiness meant all Americans had the right to be left alone as much as possible, as epitomized by the great jurist William Douglas, “The ultimate right is the right to be left alone,” to Henry David Thoreau who practiced that in his own life.

    Available Formats: Download
    Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson

    Declaration of Independence

    1.2 hrs • 10/25/07 • Unabridged
    Download
  15. 6.0 hrs • 8/20/2002 • Abridged

    When gold was first discovered on the American River above Sutter's Fort in January 1848, California was sparsely populated frontier territory not yet ceded to the United States from Mexixo. The discovery triggered a massive influx as hundreds of thousands of people scrambled to California in search of riches, braving dangerous journeys across the Pacific, around Cape Horn, and through the Isthmus of Panama, as well as across America's vast, unsettled wilderness. Cities sprang up overnight, in response to the demand for supplies and services of all kinds. By 1850, California had become a state -- the fastest journey to statehood in U.S. history. It had also become a symbol of what America stood for and of where it was going.In The Age of Gold, H. W. Brands explores the far-reaching implications of this pivotal point in U.S. history, weaving the politics of the times with the gripping stories of individuals that displays both the best and the worse of the American character. He discusses the national issues that exploded around the ratification of California's statehood, hastening the clouds that would lead to the Civil War. He tells the stories of the great fortunes made by such memorable figures as John and Jessie Fremont, Leland Stanford and George Hearst -- and of great fortunes lost by hundreds now forgotten by history. And he reveals the profound effect of the Gold Rush on the way Americans viewed their destinies, as the Puritan ethic of hard work and the gradual accumulation of worldly riches gave way to the notion of getting rich quickly.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Age of Gold

    6.0 hrs • 8/20/02 • Abridged
    Download
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions