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20th Century

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  1. 13.8 hrs • 9/27/2016 • Unabridged

    A warm, intimate account of the love between Eleanor Roosevelt and reporter Lorena Hickok—a relationship that, over more than three decades, transformed both women’s lives and empowered them to play significant roles in one of the most tumultuous periods in American history. In 1932, as her husband assumed the presidency, Eleanor Roosevelt entered the claustrophobic, duty-bound existence of the First Lady with dread. By that time, she had put her deep disappointment in her marriage behind her and developed an independent life—now threatened by the public role she would be forced to play. A lifeline came to her in the form of a feisty campaign reporter for the Associated Press: Lorena Hickok. Over the next thirty years, until Eleanor’s death, the two women carried on an extraordinary relationship: they were, at different points, lovers, confidantes, professional advisors, and caring friends. They couldn’t have been more different. Eleanor had been raised in one of the nation’s most powerful political families and was introduced to society as a debutante before marrying her distant cousin, Franklin. Hick, as she was known, had grown up poor in rural South Dakota and worked as a servant girl after she escaped an abusive home, eventually becoming one of the most respected reporters at the AP. Her admiration drew the buttoned-up Eleanor out of her shell, and the two quickly fell in love. For the next thirteen years, Hick had her own room at the White House, next door to the First Lady. These fiercely compassionate women inspired each other to right the wrongs of the turbulent era in which they lived. During the Depression, Hick reported from the nation’s poorest areas for the WPA, and Eleanor used these reports to lobby her husband for New Deal programs. Hick encouraged Eleanor to turn their frequent letters into her popular and long-lasting syndicated column “My Day,” and to befriend the female journalists who became her champions. When Eleanor’s tenure as First Lady ended with FDR’s death, Hick pushed her to continue to use her popularity for good—advice Eleanor took by leading the UN’s postwar Human Rights Commission. At every turn, the bond these women shared was grounded in their determination to better their troubled world. Deeply researched and told with warmth and charm, Eleanor and Hick is at once a tender, moving portrait of love and a surprising new look at some of the most consequential years in American history.

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    Eleanor and Hick

    13.8 hrs • 9/27/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 10.7 hrs • 9/27/2016 • Unabridged

    From atrocities that occurred before the establishment of New York’s police force in 1845 through the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in 2001 to the present day, this visual history is an insider’s look at more than eighty real-life crimes that shocked the nation, from arson to gangland murders, robberies, serial killers, bombings, and kidnappings, including:Architect Stanford White’s fatal shooting at Madison Square Garden over his deflowering of a teenage chorus girl.The anarchist bombing of Wall Street in 1920, which killed 39 people and injured hundreds more with flying shrapnel.The 1928 hit at the Park Sheraton Hotel on mobster Arnold Rothstein, who died refusing to name his shooter. Kitty Genovese’s 1964 senseless stabbing, famously witnessed by dozen of bystanders who did not intervene. Son of Sam, a serial killer who eluded police for months while terrorizing the city, was finally apprehended through a simple parking ticket. Perfect for crime buffs, urban historians, and fans of Serial and Making of a Murderer, this riveting collection details New York’s most startling and unsettling crimes through behind-the-scenes analysis of investigations and more than 500 revealing photographs.

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    Undisclosed Files of the Police by Robert Mladinich, Philip Messing, Bernard Whalen
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  3. 19.3 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    The first major biography of the irrepressible woman who changed the way we view and live in cities, and whose influence can still be felt in any discussion of urban planning to this day. Eyes on the Street is a revelation of the phenomenal woman who raised three children, wrote seven groundbreaking books, saved neighborhoods, stopped expressways, was arrested twice, and engaged at home and on the streets in thousands of debates—all of which she won. Here is the child who challenged her third-grade teacher; the high school poet; the journalist who honed her writing skills at Iron Age, Architectural Forum, Fortune, and other outlets, while amassing the knowledge she would draw upon to write her most famous book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Here, too, is the activist who helped lead an ultimately successful protest against Robert Moses’s proposed expressway through her beloved Greenwich Village; and who, in order to keep her sons out of the Vietnam War, moved to Canada, where she became as well known and admired as she was in the United States.

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    Eyes on the Street

    19.3 hrs • 9/20/16 • Unabridged
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  4. 9/13/2016 • Unabridged

    Impeccably researched, thought-challenging and leavened by wit, Getting Religion, the highly-anticipated new book from Kenneth L. Woodward, is ideal perfect for readers looking to understand how religion came to be a contentious element in 21st century public life.   Here the award-winning author blends memoir (especially of the postwar era) with copious reporting and shrewd historical analysis to tell the story of how American religion, culture and politics influenced each other in the second half of the 20th century. There are few people writing today who could tell this important story with such authority and insight. A scholar as well as one of the nation’s most respected journalists, Woodward served as Newsweek’s religion editor for nearly forty years, reporting from five continents and contributing over 700 articles, including nearly 100 cover stories, on a wide range of social issues, ideas and movements.   Beginning with a bold reassessment of the Fifties, Woodward’s narrative weaves through Civil Rights era and the movements that followed in its wake: the anti-Vietnam movement; Liberation theology in Latin America; the rise of Evangelicalism and decline of mainline Protestantism; women’s liberation and Bible; the turn to Asian spirituality; the transformation of the family and emergence of religious cults; and the embrace of righteous politics by both the Republican and Democratic Parties.   Along the way, Woodward provides riveting portraits of many of the era’s major figures:  preachers like Billy Graham and Jerry Falwell; politicians Mario Cuomo and Hillary Clinton; movement leaders Daniel Berrigan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Richard John Neuhaus; influential thinkers ranging from Erik Erikson to Elizabeth Kubler-Ross; cult leaders like Dr. Sun Myung Moon and est impresario Werner Erhardt; feminist theologians Rosemary Reuther and Elizabeth Schussler-Fiorenza; plus the author’s long time friend, the Dalai Lama.   For readers interested in how religion, economics, family life and politics influence each other, Woodward introduces fresh a fresh vocabulary of terms such as “embedded religion,” “movement religion” and “entrepreneurial religion” to illuminate the interweaving of the secular and sacred in American public life.   This is one of those rare books that changes the way Americans think about belief, behavior and belonging.

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  5. 15.2 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    From the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author, an intimate and hugely insightful account of Roosevelt’s final months of life, when, despite a dire medical prognosis, he was determined to be re-elected, deal with Stalin, and bring the war to a successful conclusion. Franklin D. Roosevelt is often ranked among the greatest of American presidents, but his legacy has never been considered like this: through the lens of his final sixteen months. This little-examined period encompasses the D-Day invasion, the Manhattan Project, the Yalta conference—and the discovery that he was suffering from severe hypertension and congestive heart failure. With precision and compassion, Joseph Lelyveld examines the choices Roosevelt made in this period, illuminating his state of mind, his preoccupations, and his motives, both as a wartime leader and in his personal life. Confronting his own mortality, Roosevelt operated under the belief that he had a duty to see the war through to the end—while simultaneously pressured by the demands of family, health, and volatile enemies. Lelyveld delivers an incisive portrait of this famously inscrutable man, full of contradictions but a consummate leader to the very last.

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    His Final Battle

    15.2 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
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  6. 8.7 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    The first biography of arguably the most influential member of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s administration, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand, FDR’s de facto chief of staff, who has been misrepresented, mischaracterized, and overlooked throughout history … until now. Widely considered the first female presidential chief of staff, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand was the right-hand woman to Franklin Delano Roosevelt—both personally and professionally—for more than twenty years. Although her official title as personal secretary was relatively humble, her power and influence were unparalleled. Everyone in the White House knew one truth: if you wanted access to Franklin, you had to get through Missy. She was one of his most trusted advisors, affording her a unique perspective on the president that no one else could claim, and she was deeply admired and respected by Eleanor and the Roosevelt children. With unprecedented access to Missy’s family and original source materials, journalist Kathryn Smith tells the captivating and forgotten story of the intelligent, loyal, and clever woman who had a front-row seat to history in the making. The Gatekeeper is a thoughtful, revealing unsung-hero story about a woman ahead of her time, the true weight of her responsibility, and the tumultuous era in which she lived; a long overdue tribute to one of the most important female figures in American history.

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    The Gatekeeper by Kathryn Smith

    The Gatekeeper

    8.7 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
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  7. 10.8 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture. Before John Glenn orbited Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia, and entering the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the civil rights movement, and the space race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades as they faced challenges, forged alliances, and used their intellect to change their own lives and their country’s future.

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    Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

    Hidden Figures

    10.8 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
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  8. 13.0 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    An acclaimed chronicler of the Civil Rights Movement, Peniel Joseph presents this sweeping overview of a key component of the struggle for racial equality-the Black Power movement. This is the story of the men and women who sacrificed so much to begin a more vocal and radical push for social change in the 1960s and 1970s.

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    Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour

    13.0 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
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  9. 7.8 hrs • 8/23/2016 • Unabridged

    A riveting new examination of the leading progressive Supreme Court justice of his era According to Jeffrey Rosen, Louis D. Brandeis was “the Jewish Jefferson,” the greatest critic of what he called “the curse of bigness” in business and government since the author of the Declaration of Independence. Published to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of his Supreme Court confirmation on June 1, 1916, Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet argues that Brandeis was the most farseeing constitutional philosopher of the twentieth century. In addition to writing the most famous article on the right to privacy, he also wrote the most important Supreme Court opinions about free speech, freedom from government surveillance, and freedom of thought and opinion. And as the leader of the American Zionist movement, he convinced Woodrow Wilson and the British government to recognize a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Combining narrative biography with a passionate argument for why Brandeis matters today, Rosen explores what Brandeis, the Jeffersonian prophet, can teach us about historic and contemporary questions involving the Constitution, monopoly, corporate and federal power, technology, privacy, free speech, and Zionism.

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    Louis D. Brandeis by Jeffrey Rosen

    Louis D. Brandeis

    7.8 hrs • 8/23/16 • Unabridged
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  10. 7.8 hrs • 8/7/2016 • Unabridged

    At a time when the hottest issue in US immigration law is the proposed action by President Obama to protect from deportation as many as five million illegals in the United States, the John Lennon case takes on special relevance, notwithstanding the passage of forty years since he was placed in deportation proceedings. This is John and Yoko’s incredible story, as told by the lawyer who fought in the front lines. In 1972 President Richard M. Nixon learned that John Lennon was visiting the United States. Nixon was told that Lennon’s continued presence here could be catastrophic to his plan for reelection. Lennon, who had just made an appearance before an audience of fifteen thousand young fans at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, was rumored to be planning to join Jerry Rubin to lead a series of rock music rallies to “Dump Nixon” in anticipation of the 1972 Republican National Convention. The special significance of the 1972 convention was the fact that this would be the first national election in which the voting age was reduced from twenty-one to eighteen, adding five to ten million new prospective voters. Nixon was not popular with this young group. Lennon was. Indeed, Senator Strom Thurmond had just written a Dear John letter to Nixon’s attorney general, John Mitchell, suggesting that deporting Lennon quickly would be an “appropriate countermeasure.” John Mitchell was the head of CREEP, the Committee to Reelect the President, whose day job was as attorney general, in charge of deporting illegal aliens. Following the Watergate-style advice of his legal counsel, John Dean, Nixon decided to “use the available political machinery to screw our political enemies” and proceeded in earnest to deport Lennon and his artist wife, Yoko Ono. Lennon and Ono consulted Leon Wildes, an expert in the field of immigration law, about the reason for their visit: their efforts to locate and secure custody of Kyoko, Yoko’s American eight-year-old child by a prior marriage. American courts had granted Lennon and Ono custody, and Ono’s prior husband violated the order to produce the child in court as ordered. Notwithstanding the Lennons’ humanitarian requests, extensions of stay as visitors were denied, the Lennons were placed in strict deportation proceedings, and the US commissioner of immigration instructed the Immigrant and Naturalization Service (INS) not to adjudicate the “outstanding artists” applications filed for Lennon and Ono by Wildes until after the Lennons were deported. Wildes kept the Lennons here for five years, despite the efforts of the government to deport them. During all that time, the Nixon administration invariably claimed that the Lennons were being treated like all other aliens and that it had no authority to make exceptions to their strict enforcement and removal of deportable aliens. Wildes invoked the power of the federal courts to discover the existence of the “non-priority program,” a hidden program authorizing the INS to defer the removal of illegals who might sustain serious hardship if removed. Wildes’ success in securing copies of thousands of applications granted such non-priority status ultimately resulted in the grant of that humanitarian remedy to Lennon. Lennon was eventually also granted lawful permanent residence status, overcoming the effects of his old British marijuana conviction. Although Wildes did not even know who John Lennon and Yoko Ono were when he was originally retained, he developed a close relationship with them both during the five-year period he represented them and thereafter.

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    John Lennon vs. the USA by Leon Wildes

    John Lennon vs. the USA

    Foreword by Michael Wildes
    7.8 hrs • 8/7/16 • Unabridged
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  11. 15.5 hrs • 8/2/2016 • Unabridged

    From Jeffrey Toobin, the bestselling author whose book The Run of His Life inspired the FX drama The People vs. O.J. Simpson, comes a rollicking account of the kidnapping and trial that defined an insane era in American history On February 4, 1973, Patty Hearst, a sophomore in college and heir to the Hearst family fortune, was kidnapped by a ragtag group of self-styled revolutionaries calling itself the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA). The already sensational story took the first of many incredible twists on April 3, when Hearst released a tape saying she had joined the SLA and had adopted the name “Tania.” The many weird turns of the tale are truly incredible—the Hearst family trying to secure Patty’s release by feeding all the people of Oakland and San Francisco for free; the videotape capturing “Tania” wielding a machine gun during a bank robbery; a cast of characters including everyone from Jim Jones to the Black Panthers to Ronald Reagan to F. Lee Bailey; the largest police shoot-out in American history; the first breaking news event to be broadcast live on all television stations across the country; Patty’s year on the lam, running from authorities; and her circus-like trial, after which the phrase “Stockholm syndrome” entered the lexicon. The saga of Patty Hearst defined a decade in which America seemed to be suffering a collective nervous breakdown. Based on more than a hundred interviews and thousands of previously secret documents, American Heiress thrillingly recounts the insanity of the times (there were an average of 1,500 terrorist bombings a year in the early 1970s). Toobin portrays the lunacy of the half-baked radicals of the SLA and the toxic mix of sex, politics, and violence that swept up Patricia Hearst and recreates her melodramatic trial. American Heiress examines the life of a young woman who suffered an unimaginable trauma and then made the startling decision to join her captors’ crusade. Or did she?

    Available Formats: CD
    American Heiress by Jeffrey Toobin

    American Heiress

    15.5 hrs • 8/2/16 • Unabridged
    CD
  12. 15.4 hrs • 8/2/2016 • Unabridged

    From Jeffrey Toobin, the bestselling author whose book The Run of His Life inspired the FX drama The People vs. O.J. Simpson, comes a rollicking account of the kidnapping and trial that defined an insane era in American history On February 4, 1973, Patty Hearst, a sophomore in college and heir to the Hearst family fortune, was kidnapped by a ragtag group of self-styled revolutionaries calling itself the Symbionese Liberation Army. The already sensational story took the first of many incredible twists on April 3, when Hearst released a tape saying she had joined the SLA and had adopted the name “Tania.” The many weird turns of the tale are truly incredible—the Hearst family trying to secure Patty’s release by feeding all the people of Oakland and San Francisco for free; the videotape capturing “Tania” wielding a machine gun during a bank robbery; a cast of characters including everyone from Jim Jones to the Black Panthers to Ronald Reagan to F. Lee Bailey; the largest police shoot-out in American history; the first breaking news event to be broadcast live on all television stations across the country; Patty’s year on the lam, running from authorities; and her circus-like trial, after which the phrase “Stockholm syndrome” entered the lexicon. The saga of Patty Hearst defined a decade in which America seemed to be suffering a collective nervous breakdown. Based on more than a hundred interviews and thousands of previously secret documents, American Heiress thrillingly recounts the insanity of the times (there were an average of 1500 terrorist bombings a year in the early 1970s). Toobin portrays the lunacy of the half-baked radicals of the SLA and the toxic mix of sex, politics, and violence that swept up Patricia Hearst; and recreates her melodramatic trial. American Heiress examines the life of a young woman who suffered an unimaginable trauma and then made the startling decision to join her captors’ crusade. Or did she?

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    American Heiress

    15.4 hrs • 8/2/16 • Unabridged
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  13. 7.9 hrs • 8/1/2016

    SpeechWorks presents this collection of the greatest speeches of great women. Represented here are some of the most famous women of recent history, including athletes, politicians, businesswomen, diplomats, heads of state, activists, philanthropists, and more. You will hear the actual voices of these women, recorded at public functions at which they were the featured speaker. Included are the following:Amelia Earhart, American aviation pioneerClare Boothe Luce, American author, politician and diplomatEleanor Roosevelt, American polician, diplomat, and activistGolda Meir, a teacher, politician, stateswoman, and prime minister of IsraelMother Teresa, Roman Catholic nun and missionaryKatharine Hepburn, Academy Award–winning actressBenazir Bhutto, former prime minister of PakistanNancy Pelosi, speaker of the US House of RepresentativesQueen Noor of Jordan, widow of King Hussein of JordanAyaan Hirsi Ali, Dutch American activist, author, and politicianBillie Jean King, American tennis championGloria Steinem, American journalist and activistNadia Comaneci, Romanian champion gymnastMelinda Gates, American businesswoman and philanthropistHillary Clinton, American politicianOprah Winfrey, American actress, talk-show host, and media proprietorCondoleezza Rice, American political scientistMalala Yousafzai, Pakistani activist and Nobel Prize laureateCarly Fiorina, American businesswoman

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    The Greatest Speeches of Great Women by SpeechWorks
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  14. 22.1 hrs • 7/12/2016 • Unabridged

    Giving voice to the voiceless, the Chicago Defender condemned Jim Crow, catalyzed the Great Migration, and focused the electoral power of black America. Robert S. Abbott founded the Defender in 1905, smuggled hundreds of thousands of copies into the most isolated communities in the segregated South, and was dubbed a “Modern Moses,” becoming one of the first black millionaires in the process. His successor wielded the newspaper’s clout to elect mayors and presidents, including Harry S. Truman and John F. Kennedy, who would have lost in 1960 if not for the Defender’s support. Along the way, its pages were filled with columns by legends like Ida B. Wells, Langston Hughes, and Martin Luther King Jr. Drawing on dozens of interviews and extensive archival research, Ethan Michaeli constructs a revelatory narrative of race in America from the age of Teddy Roosevelt to the age of Barack Obama and brings to life the reporters who braved lynch mobs and policemen’s clubs to do their jobs.

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    The Defender by Ethan Michaeli

    The Defender

    22.1 hrs • 7/12/16 • Unabridged
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  15. 7.7 hrs • 7/12/2016 • Unabridged

    Robert P. Jones, CEO of the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI), challenges us to grasp the profound political and cultural consequences of a new reality—that America is no longer a majority white Christian nation. For most of our nation’s history, White Christian America (WCA)—the cultural and political edifice built primarily by white Protestant Christians—set the tone for our national policy and shaped American ideals. But especially since the 1990s, WCA has steadily lost influence, following declines within both its mainline and evangelical branches. Today, America is no longer demographically or culturally a majority white Christian nation. Drawing on more than four decades of polling data, The End of White Christian America explains and analyzes the waning vitality of WCA. Jones argues that the visceral nature of today’s most heated issues—the vociferous arguments around same-sex marriage and religious liberty, the rise of the Tea Party following the election of our first black president, and stark disagreements between black and white Americans over the fairness of the criminal justice system—can only be understood against the backdrop of white Christians’ anxieties as America’s racial and religious topography shifts around them. In 2016 and beyond, the descendants of WCA will lack the political power they once had to set the terms of the nation’s debate over values and morals and to determine election outcomes. Looking ahead, Jones forecasts the ways that they might adjust to find their place in the new America—and the consequences for us all if they don’t.

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    The End of White Christian America

    7.7 hrs • 7/12/16 • Unabridged
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  16. 6.0 hrs • 7/8/2016 • Unabridged

    Maverick author Hunter S. Thompson introduced the world to “gonzo journalism” with this cult classic that shot back up the best-seller lists after Thompson’s suicide in 2005. No book ever written has more perfectly captured the spirit of the 1960s counterculture. In Las Vegas to cover a motorcycle race, Raoul Duke (Thompson) and his attorney Dr. Gonzo (inspired by a friend of Thompson) are quickly diverted to search for the American dream. Their quest is fueled by nearly every drug imaginable and quickly becomes a surreal experience that blurs the line between reality and fantasy. But there is more to this hilarious tale than reckless behavior—for underneath the hallucinogenic facade is a stinging criticism of American greed and consumerism.

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    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

    6.0 hrs • 7/8/16 • Unabridged
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