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  1. 1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
    22.4 hrs • 1/1/1991 • Unabridged

    The tempestuous, bloody, and splendid reign of Henry VIII of England (1509–1547) is one of the most fascinating in all history, not least for his marriage to six extraordinary women. In this accessible work of brilliant scholarship, Alison Weir draws on early biographies, letters, memoirs, account books, and diplomatic reports to bring these women to life. Catherine of Aragon emerges as a staunch though misguided woman of principle; Anne Boleyn, an ambitious adventuress with a penchant for vengeance; Jane Seymour, a strong-minded matriarch in the making; Anne of Cleves, a good-natured and innocent woman naively unaware of the court intrigues that determined her fate; Catherine Howard, an empty-headed wanton; and Catherine Parr, a warm-blooded bluestocking who survived King Henry to marry a fourth time.

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    The Six Wives of Henry VIII

    22.4 hrs • 1/1/91 • Unabridged
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    3.0 hrs • 10/1/1990 • Abridged

    First published in 1990, Songs of the Doomed is back in print -- by popular demand! In this third and most extraordinary volume of the Gonzo Papers, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson recalls high and hideous moments in his thirty years in the Passing Lane -- and no one is safe from his hilarious, remarkably astute social commentary. With Thompson's trademark insight and passion about the state of American politics and culture, Songs of the Doomed charts the long, strange trip from Kennedy to Quayle in Thompson's freewheeling, inimitable style. Spanning four decades -- 1950 to 1990 -- Thompson is at the top of his form while fleeing New York for Puerto Rico, riding with the Hell's Angels, investigating Las Vegas sleaze, grappling with the "Dukakis problem," and finally, detailing his infamous lifestyle bust, trial documents, and Fourth Amendment battle with the Law. These tales -- often sleazy, brutal, and crude -- are only the tip of what Jack Nicholson called "the most baffling human iceberg of our time." Songs of the Doomed is vintage Thompson -- a brilliant, brazen, bawdy compilation of the greatest sound bites of Gonzo journalism from the past thirty years.

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    Songs of the Doomed

    3.0 hrs • 10/1/90 • Abridged
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  3. 19.8 hrs • 1/21/1989 • Unabridged

    James McPherson’s fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War—the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry, and then moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself—the battles, the strategic maneuvering on both sides, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson’s new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union’s victory. The book’s title refers to the sentiments that informed both the Northern and Southern views of the conflict: the South seceded in the name of that freedom of self-determination and self-government for which their fathers had fought in 1776, while the North stood fast in defense of the Union founded by those fathers as the bulwark of American liberty. Eventually, the North had to grapple with the underlying cause of the war—slavery—and adopt a policy of emancipation as a second war aim. This “new birth of freedom,” as Lincoln called it, constitutes the proudest legacy of America’s bloodiest conflict. This authoritative volume makes sense of that vast and confusing “second American Revolution” we call the Civil War, a war that transformed a nation and expanded our heritage of liberty.

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    Battle Cry of Freedom, Vol. 2

    19.8 hrs • 1/21/89 • Unabridged
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  4. 19.9 hrs • 2/25/1988 • Unabridged

    James M. McPherson, professor emeritus of US history at Princeton, is one of the foremost scholars of the Civil War. In this informative and meticulously researched masterpiece, he clarifies the differing ways of life and philosophy that led to this shattering conflict. Abraham Lincoln wondered whether “in a free government the minority have the right to break up the government.” Jefferson Davis felt “forced to take up arms” to guarantee states’ rights. McPherson merges the words of these men and other political luminaries, as well as housewives and soldiers from both armies, with his own concise analysis of the war, creating a story as compelling as any novel. Battle Cry of Freedom vividly traces how a new nation was forged when a war both sides were sure would amount to little dragged on for four years and cost more American lives than all other wars combined.

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    Battle Cry of Freedom, Vol. 1

    19.9 hrs • 2/25/88 • Unabridged
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  5. 13.0 hrs • 1/12/1986 • Unabridged

    Fifty-five men met in Philadelphia in 1787 to write a document that would create a country and change a world: the Constitution. Here is a remarkable rendering of that fateful time, told with humanity and humor. Decision in Philadelphia is the best popular history of the Constitutional Convention; in it, the life and times of eighteenth century America not only come alive, but the very human qualities of the men who framed the document are brought provocatively into focus—casting many of the Founding Fathers in a new light. A celebration of how and why our Constitution came into being, Decision in Philadelphia is also a testament of the American spirit at its finest.

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  6. 5.4 hrs • 8/12/1985 • Unabridged

    A journalistic masterpiece. John Hersey transports us back to the streets of Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945—the day the city was destroyed by the first atomic bomb. Told through the memories of six survivors, Hiroshima is a timeless, powerful classic that will awaken your heart and your compassion. In this new edition, Hersey returns to Hiroshima to find the survivors—and to tell their fates in an eloquent and moving final chapter.

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    Hiroshima

    5.4 hrs • 8/12/85 • Unabridged
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  7. 9.1 hrs • 1/1/1985 • Unabridged

    Hitler and the Holocaust is the product of a lifetime’s work by one of the world’s foremost authorities on the history of anti-Semitism and modern Jewry. Robert S. Wistrich begins by reckoning with Europe’s long history of violence against the Jews, and how that tradition manifested itself in Germany and Austria in the early twentieth century. He looks at the forces that shaped Hitler’s belief in a “Jewish menace” that must be eradicated, and the process by which, once Hitler gained power, the Nazi regime tightened the noose around Germany’s Jews. He deals with many crucial questions, such as when Hitler’s plans for mass genocide were finalized, the relationship between the Holocaust and the larger war, and the mechanism of authority by which power, and guilt, flowed out from the Nazi inner circle to “ordinary Germans,” and other Europeans. He explains the infernal workings of the death machine, the nature of Jewish and other resistance, and the sad story of collaboration and indifference across Europe and America, and in the Church. Finally, Wistrich discusses the abiding legacy of the Nazi genocide, and the lessons that must be drawn from it. A work of commanding authority and insight, Hitler and the Holocaust is an indelible contribution to the literature of history.

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  8. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    20.2 hrs • 11/3/1981 • Unabridged

    In words that weave history into art, Bruce Catton has created a book about the coming of the Civil War that is at once a broad canvas and a revealing close-up. Different from anything he has written before, except in the sheer beauty of its narrative style, The Coming Fury is conceived as classic tragedy; as a series of ever-narrowing circles of choice with fewer and fewer men to make them, enclosing, finally, but two men faced with almost no choice at all. Through these pages move the men who guided, and who followed, the nation toward conflict: the extremists, the moderates, and those men, great and small, caught in between. Opening with the Democratic convention, Charleston, April, 1850, where an almost festive atmosphere prevailed, it closes with nation torn asunder by the first Battle of Bull Run. How did it all happen, and why? Was the conflict truly ‘irrepressible’? These are the questions examined in Bruce Catton’s The Coming Fury, a work informed by exhaustive scholarship, comprehensive in outlook, panoramic, yet intensely personal in expression.

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    The Coming Fury

    20.2 hrs • 11/3/81 • Unabridged
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  9. 1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
    14.6 hrs • 11/1/1981 • Unabridged

    In the Wall Street Journal, Victor Davis Hanson named With the Old Breed one of the top five books on epic twentieth-century battles. Studs Terkel interviewed the author for his definitive oral history, The Good War. Now E. B. Sledge’s acclaimed first-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa returns to thrill, edify, and inspire a new generation. An Alabama boy steeped in American history and enamored of such heroes as George Washington and Daniel Boone, Eugene B. Sledge became part of the war’s famous 1st Marine Division—3rd Battalion, 5th Marines. Even after intense training, he was shocked to be thrown into the battle of Peleliu, where “the world was a nightmare of flashes, explosions, and snapping bullets.” By the time Sledge hit the hell of Okinawa, he was a combat vet, still filled with fear but no longer with panic. Based on notes Sledge secretly kept in a copy of the New Testament, With the Old Breed captures with utter simplicity and searing honesty the experience of a soldier in the fierce Pacific Theater. Here is what saved, threatened, and changed his life. Here, too, is the story of how he learned to hate and kill, and came to love, his fellow man.

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    With the Old Breed

    14.6 hrs • 11/1/81 • Unabridged
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  10. 11.5 hrs • 1/1/1977 • Unabridged

    A nominee for the National Book Award, Ivan Doig’s brilliant memoir shares the experiences and culture that shaped his early years and made him fall in love with the West. From his childhood in a family of homesteaders through the death of his mother and his move to Montana to herd sheep, Doig shows his intimate connection with the American West.

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    This House of Sky

    11.5 hrs • 1/1/78 • Unabridged
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  11. 11.6 hrs • 1/1/1973 • Unabridged

    Acclaimed author Win Blevins’ Stone Song won the Spur Award and the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award. For over thirty years, from the time of Lewis and Clark into the 1840s, the mountain men explored the Great American West. As trappers in a hostile, trackless land, their exploits opened the gates of the mountains for the wagon trains of pioneers who followed them. In Give Your Heart to the Hawks, Win Blevins presents a poetic tribute to these dauntless “first Westerners” and their incredible adventures. The stories included are:John Colter, who, in 1808, naked and without weapons or food, escaped captivity by the Blackfeet and ran and walked 250 miles to Fort Lisa at the mouth of the Yellowstone River;Hugh Glass, who was mauled by a grizzly in 1823, left for dead by his trapper companions, and crawled 300 miles to Fort Kiowa on the Missouri;Kit Carson, who ran away from home at age seventeen, became a legendary mountain man in his twenties and served as scout and guide for John C. Fremont’s westward explorations of the 1840s;Jedediah Smith, a tall, gaunt, Bible-reading New Yorker whose trapping expeditions ranged from the Rockies to California and who was killed by Comanches on the Cimarron in 1831.

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    Give Your Heart to the Hawks

    11.6 hrs • 1/1/73 • Unabridged
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    19.3 hrs • 12/1/1965 • Unabridged

    The final work in this series begins in December of 1862. Four months before, the Union Army tasted long-awaited victory at the bloody battle of Antietam. Grant continued on towards Vicksburg, Mississippi. The grim battles that lay ahead would be costly: the Vicksburg campaign, Chattanooga, the Battle of the Wilderness, the Battle of Atlanta and the March to the Sea, the siege of Petersburg. There would be two and a half more years of war before Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, followed by Lincoln’s death just six days later.

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    Never Call Retreat

    19.3 hrs • 12/1/65 • Unabridged
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    20.0 hrs • 4/24/1963 • Unabridged

    In The Coming Fury, the first volume of this magnificent American Civil War trilogy, Bruce Catton described the forces that combined to tear the United States apart, a portrait of a gathering storm that finally erupted at Bull Run. Now, in Terrible Swift Sword, he shows how the Union and Confederacy slowly reconciled themselves to all-out war. At the start, there action was sparse, as each side reviewed its position, counting its heads and guns. The North had advantages on both fronts (but not one in General McClellan who is immortalized by excerpts taken directly from his arrogant letters). The South recognized that it would have to strike hard to win, but it had terrible handicaps (including flintlock rifles that would not fire in the rain). It waited for the inevitable. Gradually, the action changed from small skirmishes to major battles and with it the statures of Lee, Grant, Jefferson Davis, and Sherman emerged. Slowly and inexorably, the conflict changed its nature from an uninspiring police action to a series of bloody clashes for the cause of ending human slavery. It became a war for freedom.

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    Terrible Swift Sword

    20.0 hrs • 4/24/63 • Unabridged
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  14. 10.5 hrs • 6/27/1960 • Unabridged

    A three-week trip down the Brazos River, into which is woven a history of the people who have lived along its banks-Indians, settlers, warriors, and wanderers. In the 1950s, a series of dams was proposed along the Brazos River in north-central Texas. For John Graves, this project meant that if the stream’s regimen was thus changed, the beautiful and sometimes brutal surrounding countryside would also change, as would the lives of the people whose rugged ancestors had eked out an existence there. Graves therefore decided to visit that stretch of the river, which he had known intimately as a youth. Goodbye to a River is his account of that farewell canoe voyage. As he braves rapids and fatigue and the fickle autumn weather, he muses upon old blood feuds of the region and violent skirmishes with native tribes and retells wild stories of courage and cowardice and deceit that shaped both the river’s people and the land during frontier times and later. Nearly half a century after its initial publication, Goodbye to a River is a true American classic, a vivid narrative about an exciting journey and a powerful tribute to a vanishing way of life and its ever-changing natural environment.

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    Goodbye to a River

    10.5 hrs • 6/27/60 • Unabridged
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  15. 0 reviews 0 5 4.7 4 out of 5 stars 4.7/5
    5.0 hrs • 11/1/1955 • Unabridged

    Over one hundred years ago, the mightiest “unsinkable” ship began her maiden voyage to cross the Atlantic. An engineering feat eleven stories high, the Titanic contained a list of passengers collectively worth $250 million when she left port on April 10, 1912, but she would never reach her destination. The Titanic collided with an iceberg on the night of April 14, and 1,500 people died in the freezing waters as the ship met her watery grave. Spectacular in many ways, it’s a story that has spurred legends and still sends shivers down the spine a century later. This minute-by-minute account of the sinking is based on over twenty years of research, and offers amazing detail of that fateful night. Read by Martin Jarvis, it’s a riveting account of one of the world’s biggest maritime disasters and the behavior of the passengers and crew. Some sacrificed their lives, while others fought like animals for their own survival. Wives beseeched husbands to join them in lifeboats; gentlemen went taut-lipped to their deaths in full evening dress; and hundreds of steerage passengers, trapped below decks, sought help in vain. From the initial distress flares to the struggles of those left adrift for hours in freezing waters, this audiobook brings that moonlit night in 1912 to life for a new generation of listeners.

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    A Night to Remember by Walter Lord

    A Night to Remember

    5.0 hrs • 11/1/55 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4.7 4 out of 5 stars 4.7/5
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