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  1. 10.9 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    The radical search for the simple life in today’s America. In the dead of winter, a former marine biologist and his pregnant wife, a classically trained opera singer, disembark an Amtrak train in La Plata, Missouri, assemble two bikes, and pedal off into the night, bound for a homestead they’ve purchased, sight unseen. Meanwhile, in Detroit, a horticulturist, daughter of the city and descendant of Mississippi sharecroppers, and her husband, a disillusioned public school teacher, have turned to urban farming to revitalize the blighted city they both love. And near Missoula, Montana, a couple who have been at the forefront of organic farming for decades navigate what it means to live and raise a family ethically. More than ever, we seem to be yearning for “the simple life.” We want to reconnect with the land and the environment in a deeper way that can assuage modern ills. We seek a livelihood that exercises body and mind without taking a toll on the planet. We long to nurture spirit and community instead of distracting and isolating ourselves with electronics. We even dream utopian dreams of discovering ways of life that model for others answers to the question of how we can live more sustainably, peacefully, authentically. A work of immersive journalism steeped in a distinctively American social history and sparked by a personal quest, The Unsettlers traces the search for the simple life not only through the stories of those three very different couples, but through the visionaries, ascetics, and artists that inspired each of them to walk away from the life they knew in order to find (or create) a better existence. Captivating and clear-eyed, it dares us to imagine what a sustainable, ethical, authentic future might actually look like.

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    The Unsettlers

    10.9 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  2. 8.9 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    A visionary examination of the deteriorating ability of the U.S. and other global powers to shape the world in their image, and the end of the world order they sought, from the president of the Council on Foreign Relations   Things fall apart; the center cannot hold. Not just a line from a Yeats poem, this is, argues Council on Foreign Relations president Richard Haass, an apt description of the current state of the world. A World in Disarray is his wise, historically grounded examination of the current world, how we got here, what will happen next, and what it will mean for us all. Great powers, particularly the United States, for long the dominant building blocks of international relations, are losing some and in certain cases much of their sway to other entities and forces. Disorder is on the rise. In fact, as Haass shows, America's leadership has at times made matters worse, both by trying to do too much and by increasingly failing to use the power it does have.  Adding to the problem is a decline in the ability of the country's elected representatives to agree on a consistent course of action or to ensure that the U.S. has the economic, human, military, and physical resources global leadership requires.    Meanwhile, power in all its forms is more distributed in more hands than at any time in history. The same holds for technology.  Decision-making is ever more decentralized.  Globalization with its vast, fast flows of just about anything and everything across borders, is a reality that governments often cannot monitor, much less manage. World population, already above seven billion, is projected to rise to at least nine billion by mid-century. Climate change now outpaces the world's ability to stop or in some cases adapt to it. For its part, the United States remains the strongest country in the world, but its share of global power is shrinking, as is its ability to translate the considerable power it does have into influence. A World in Disarray traces the history of the rise of the modern state system through the end of the Cold War and illustrates how the past twenty-five years have seen a surprising unraveling of order in many domains, including but in no way limited to the Middle East.   A World in Disarray offers much more than analysis, however. Haass argues the world needs an updated operating system--call it world order 2.0--that takes into account new forces, challenges, and non-state actors. One critical element of this adjustment, particularly for the United States, will be adopting a new approach to sovereignty, one that embraces its obligations and responsibilities as well as its rights and protections. Haass also details what the U.S. should do towards China and Russia, in Asia and the Middle East, and at home on behalf of its national security. Drawing on the author's own years of expertise as an analyst and official at the highest levels of government, A World in Disarray is a lucid and incisive analysis of our shifting landscape and the need for a new American foreign policy that reflects a twenty-first century world that in ways promises to be a departure from much that has come before.

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    A World in Disarray

    8.9 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  3. 10.6 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    As president, the former Supreme Commander of Allied Forces during World War II successfully guided the country out of war in Korea, through the apocalyptic threat of nuclear war with Russia, and into one of the greatest economic booms in world history. In this last address to the nation, Eisenhower looked to the future, warning Americans against the dangers of elevating partisanship above national interest, excessive government budgets (particularly deficit spending), the expansion of the military-industrial complex, and the creeping political power of special interests. Baier explores the many ways these visionary words continue to resonate today; he also explains how Ike embodied the qualities of political leadership that the country is urgently hungering for at the present. Seeking to prepare a new generation for power, Eisenhower intensely advised the forty-three-year-old Kennedy in the intervening time between the speech and the inauguration. Dwight Eisenhower left the public stage at the end of these three days in January 1961 having done more than perhaps any other modern American to set the nation “on our charted course toward permanent peace and human betterment.” Despite their differences in party affiliation, President Kennedy would continue to seek his predecessor’s advice and counsel during his time in office. Five decades later, Baier’s Three Days in January illuminates how Eisenhower, an under-appreciated giant of U.S. history, still offers vital lessons for our own time.

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    Three Days in January

    10.6 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  4. 9.7 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    In The Genius of Judaism Europe’s foremost philosopher and activist confronts his own spiritual roots and the religion that has always inspired and shaped him—but that he has never fully reckoned with. The result is a breathtaking new vision and understanding of Judaism and what it means to be a Jew, a vision quite different from the one we’re used to. Taking us from a fresh, surprising critique of an anti-Semitism Bernard-Henri Lévy sees on the rise in a new and stealthy form today, to a provocative defense of Israel from the left, to a secret history of the Jewish roots of Western democratic ideals, to a call to confront the current Islamist threat while intellectually dismantling it, Lévy explains how Jews are not a “chosen people” but a “treasure” whose spirit continues to—and must—inform moral thinking and courage today.

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    The Genius of Judaism

    Translated by Steven B. Kennedy
    9.7 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  5. 10.6 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    Since Marco Polo, the West has waited for the “Asian Century.” Today, the world believes that century has arrived. Yet from China’s slumping economy to war clouds over the South China Sea and from environmental devastation to demographic crisis, Asia’s future is increasingly uncertain. Historian and geopolitical expert Michael Auslin argues that far from being a cohesive powerhouse, Asia is a fractured region threatened by stagnation and instability. Here he provides a comprehensive account of the economic, military, political, and demographic risks that bedevil half of our world, arguing that Asia, working with the United States, has a unique opportunity to avert catastrophe—but only if it acts boldly. Bringing together firsthand observations and decades of research, Auslin’s provocative reassessment of Asia’s future will be a must-listen for industry and investors, as well as politicians and scholars, for years to come.

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    The End of the Asian Century by Michael R. Auslin

    The End of the Asian Century

    10.6 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  6. 10.1 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    George Washington’s Farewell Address was a prophetic letter from a “parting friend” to his fellow citizens about the forces he feared could destroy our democracy: hyper-partisanship, excessive debt, and foreign wars. Once celebrated as civic scripture, more widely reprinted than the Declaration of Independence, the Farewell Address is now almost forgotten. Its message remains starkly relevant. In Washington’s Farewell, John Avlon offers a stunning portrait of our first president and his battle to save America from self-destruction. At the end of his second term, Washington surprised Americans by publishing his Farewell message in a newspaper. The President called for unity among “citizens by birth or choice,” advocated moderation, defended religious pluralism, proposed a foreign policy of independence (not isolation), and proposed that education is essential to democracy. He established the precedent for the peaceful transfer of power. Washington’s urgent message was adopted by Jefferson after years of opposition and quoted by Lincoln in defense of the Union. Woodrow Wilson invoked it for nation-building; Eisenhower for Cold War; Reagan for religion. Now the Farewell Address may inspire a new generation to re-center our politics and reunite our nation through the lessons rooted in Washington’s experience. As John Avlon describes the perilous state of the new nation that Washington was preparing to leave as its leader, with enduring wisdom, he reveals him to be the indispensable Founding Father.

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    Washington's Farewell

    10.1 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  7. 2.0 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    The Civil War is best remembered for the big battles and the legendary generals who fought on both sides, like Robert E. Lee facing off against Ulysses S. Grant in 1864. In kind, the Eastern theater has always drawn more interest and attention than the West. However, while massive armies marched around the country fighting each other, there were other small guerrilla groups that engaged in irregular warfare on the margins. Among these partisan bushwhackers, none are as infamous as William Quantrill and Quantrill’s Raiders. Quantrill’s Raiders operated along the border between Missouri and Kansas, which had been the scene of partisan fighting over a decade earlier during the debate over whether Kansas and Nebraska would enter the Union as free states or slave states. In “Bleeding Kansas”, zealous pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces fought each other, most notably John Brown, and the region became a breeding ground for Unionists and pro-slavery factions who shifted right back into similar fighting once the Civil War started. Rather than target military infrastructure or enemy soldiers, the bushwhackers rode in smaller numbers and targeted civilians on the other side of the conflict, making legends out of men like Bloody Bill Anderson and John Mosby. Though Quantrill’s Raiders were named after their famous leader William Clark Quantrill, the most notorious of the Raiders was none other than Jesse James. Frank and Jesse James have become American legends for their daring robberies and narrow escapes from the law, and many people, especially in the South, see them as folk heroes, unreconstructed rebels fighting for the Lost Cause against rich Northern bankers and capitalists. While that last bit is a matter for debate, the James brothers did indeed consider themselves Southern rebels at heart. The Wild West has made legends out of many men after their deaths, but like Wild Bill Hickok, Jesse James was a celebrity during his life. However, while Hickok was (mostly) a lawman, Jesse James was and remains the most famous outlaw of the Wild West, with both his life of crime and his death remaining pop culture fixtures. James and his notorious older brother Frank were Confederate bushwhackers in the lawless region of Missouri during the Civil War. Despite being a teenager, Jesse James was severely wounded twice during the war, including being shot in the chest, but that would hardly slow him down after the war ended. Eventually, Quantrill’s Raiders headed south, and they eventually split off into several groups. Quantrill himself was killed while fighting in June 1865, nearly two months after Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, but his name was kept alive by the notorious deeds of his Raiders during the war and the criminal exploits of former Raiders like Jesse and Frank James, as well as the Younger brothers. These men became some of America’s most famous outlaws, and they used guerrilla tactics to rob banks and trains while eluding capture. While their robberies were conducted more to enrich themselves than to strike back against the North, their rebel credentials were impeccable. The brothers came from a secessionist, slaveholding family and both fought for the Confederacy in the bitterest guerrilla war the nation has ever seen. To understand their outlaw careers, and their enduring legacy, one must understand how Frank and Jesse James fought during the Civil War. Frank and Jesse James in the Civil War: The History of the Bushwhackers Who Became Outlaws of the Wild West chronicles the history and events that involved the James brothers during the Civil War, and how the Civil War affected their lives as outlaws.

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    Frank and Jesse James in the Civil War

    2.0 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  8. 1.3 hrs • 1/10/2017 • Unabridged

    What was the bloodiest war in American history? Most people with at least a little knowledge of history would quickly say that it was the Civil War (1861-65), and they would certainly be correct overall. In recently-updated numbers, it is thought that over 750,000 Americans died in the Civil War from battle wounds, diseases and other causes. In a single day at the battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862, almost 27,000 soldiers were killed, wounded and missing. However, when historians go farther back in time and include colonial wars and look at casualties per capita, the correct answer would be the much-lesser known conflict known as “King Philip’s War” (1675-76). While a significant 2.5% of the U.S. population perished in the Civil War, 5% of New England’s white settler population died during King Philip’s War, during which 13 towns were destroyed and 600 dwellings were burned by the natives. A larger, indeterminate number of the native population also died in the war. A hundred thousand pounds, an enormous sum of money in those days, was expended by the colonies in defeating the Indians. Edward Randolph, who was sent to the colonies a few years after the war, bemoaned just how ruinous and unnecessary the fighting had been: “The losse to the English in the severall colonies, in their habitations and stock, is reckoned to amount to £150,000 there having been about 1200 houses burned, 8000 head of cattle, great and small, killed, and many thousand bushels of wheat, peas and other grain burned (of which the Massachusets colony hath not been damnifyed one third part, the great losse falling upon New Plymouth and Connecticot colonies) and upward of 3000 Indians men women and children destroyed, who if well managed would have been very serviceable to the English, which makes all manner of labour dear. The war at present is near an end. In Plymouth colony the Indians surrender themselves to Gov. Winslow, upon mercy, and bring in all their armes, are wholly at his disposall, except life and transportation; but for all such as have been notoriously cruell to women and children, so soon as discovered they are to be executed in the sight of their fellow Indians.” King Philip’s War: The History and Legacy of the 17th Century Conflict Between Puritan New England and the Native Americans examines one of the most important wars fought in the colonial era.

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    King Philip's War

    1.3 hrs • 1/10/17 • Unabridged
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  9. 10.8 hrs • 1/9/2017 • Unabridged

    Back by popular demand, the bestselling Politically Incorrect Guides provide an unvarnished, unapologetic overview of the topics every American needs to know. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1 profiles America’s early presidents, from George Washington to William Howard Taft.

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    The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1 by Larry Schweikart
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  10. 0.1 hrs • 1/5/2017 • Unabridged

    J.B. Rhine (1895 - 1980), widely considered to be the “Father of Modern Parapsychology,” was the world’s leading investigator of psychic phenomena, ESP and the paranormal. He founded the parapsychology research lab at Duke University and the Journal of Parapsychology. Dr. Rhine, who coined the term “extrasensory perception” (ESP) to describe the apparent ability of some people to acquire information without the use of the known five senses), wrote several books on ESP and the paranormal. Rhine investigated ghosts, telepathy, poltergeists, and other unseen parapsychology phenomena from 1927 to 1965 at his Duke laboratory, and for several years after that at a private laboratory. The following was recorded from a Rhine lecture on psychokinesis and his ESP experiments.

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    A Rare Recording of J.B. Rhine

    0.1 hrs • 1/5/17 • Unabridged
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  11. 7.8 hrs • 1/4/2017 • Recorded Seminar

    An award-winning, widely recognized expert on pre-modern history, Professor Thomas F. Madden concludes this two-part series on the medieval world. In this course, we will see the error of the commonly held assumption that the “Dark Ages” was a time of superstition, ignorance, and violence. Rather than a time of darkness, the Middle Ages saw extraordinary innovation, invention, and cultural vitality. It was the Middle Ages that gave us universities, vernacular literature, and the extraordinary beauty of Gothic architecture. To study the medieval world, then, is not only to study a time that has passed away. It is to study the birth of a new culture that would mature into the modern West. Whether we know it or not, the world we live in today is itself the product of the Middle Ages-not “Dark,” but remarkably bright.

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  12. 8.3 hrs • 1/4/2017 • Recorded Seminar

    This all-encompassing investigation of a highly influential time period includes the major events of the era and informative discussion of empire, papacy, the Crusades, and the fall of Constantinople. During the course of these lectures, Professor Madden also addresses the rise of Islam, reform movements, and schisms in the church. In so doing, Professor Madden underscores the significance and grand scale of an age that continues to hold an undeniable fascination for people today.

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  13. 9.8 hrs • 1/4/2017 • Unabridged

    Esta obra nos lleva a través de la historia de las fotografías que el fotógrafo Castellón toma durante los tiempos de la guerra en Europa y los tiempos de paz en Nicaragua, pasa de un episodio a otro desde la naciente Nicaragua, un ghetto en Varsovia, o a un monasterio en Mallorca y muchos más. Así como también mencionando a un sin numero de personajes de la historia universal con los que tiene algún contacto el fotógrafo Castellón, como el mercenario Walter, Napoleón el pequeño, Turgueniev, Flaubert y George Sand, la misma reina Victoria y personajes tales como Wenceslao Vivorny y el archiduque Luis Salvador. Además hay pasajes de la historia donde vemos caer y surgir ideales, sueños y grandes negocios. No podemos dejar de mencionar la aparición de Chopin y Ruben Dario en la misma historia.

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    Mil y una muertes

    9.8 hrs • 1/4/17 • Unabridged
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  14. 8.1 hrs • 1/3/2017 • Unabridged

    Once a most unlikely candidate, Barack Obama’s successful campaign for the White House made him a worldwide sensation and a transformative figure even before he was inaugurated. Elected as the Iraq War and Great Recession discouraged millions of Americans, Obama’s promise of hope revived the national spirit. Had he only saved the economy, Obama would be considered a truly successful president. However he has achieved so much more, against ferocious opposition, that he can be counted as one of the most consequential presidents in history. With health-care reform, he ended a crisis of escalating costs and inadequate access that threatened 50 million people. His energy policies drove down the cost of power generated by the sun, wind, and even fossil fuels. His climate change efforts produced the first treaty to address global warming in a meaningful way, and his diplomacy produced a dramatic reduction in the nuclear threat posed by Iran. Add the withdrawal of troops from Iraq, the normalization of relations with Cuba, and the “pivot” toward Asia, and his successes abroad match those at home. In A Consequential President, Michael D’Antonio tallies Obama’s long record of achievement, both his major successes and less noticed ones that nevertheless contribute to his legacy. Obama’s greatest achievement came as he restored dignity and ethics to the office of the president, proof that he delivered the hope and change he promised.

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    A Consequential President by Michael D'Antonio

    A Consequential President

    8.1 hrs • 1/3/17 • Unabridged
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  15. 1 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5 (1)
    10.5 hrs • 1/3/2017 • Unabridged

    Since the days of conquistador Hernan Cortes, rumors have circulated about an ancient White City of immense wealth hidden in the Honduran interior. Indigenous tribes speak of ancestors who had fled there to escape the Spanish, warning that anyone who disturbs this sacred city will fall ill and die. In 1940, swashbuckling journalist Theodore Morde returned from the jungle with hundreds of artifacts and tantalizing stories of having seen the crumbling walls of the Lost City of the Monkey God for himself. Soon after, he committed suicide without revealing its mysterious location. Three quarters of a century later, bestselling author Doug Preston climbed aboard a rickety, single-engine plane carrying expensive laser technology that could map the terrain under the dense rainforest canopy. That flight revealed for the first time an unmistakeable image of a sprawling metropolis, tantalizing proof of not just the mythical city but an entire lost civilization. Suspenseful, surprising, and unputdownable, The Lost City of the Monkey God is narrative nonfiction at its most compelling: a story of adventure, danger, ancient curses, modern technology, a stunning medical mystery, and a riveting eye-witness account of one of the great discoveries of the twenty-first century.

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    The Lost City of the Monkey God

    10.5 hrs • 1/3/17 • Unabridged
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  16. 17.1 hrs • 1/3/2017 • Unabridged

    A visceral, hundred-year history of the vast Russian penal colony. From the beginning of the nineteenth century to the Russian Revolution, the last tsarist regimes exiled more than one million prisoners and their families to Siberia. Common criminals, political radicals, prostitutes, and alcoholics arrived desperate and half-starving in a land of harsh weather, grueling work, and pestilential conditions. A place of brutal realities, it was known as “the vast prison without a roof.” In his riveting new history, Daniel Beer takes readers deep inside Siberia, unearthing true-life tales of inhuman punishments and the crimes that occasioned them. Focusing his gaze on the last four tsars (1801 to 1917), Beer sheds light on how the massive penal colony, a project of correction and colonization, became an incubator for the radicalism of revolutionaries who would one day rule Russia. As comprehensive as it is bloody, The House of the Dead delves beneath the statistics and dares to imagine the human experience of Siberian exile. Beer’s original scholarship—examining letters, petitions, and court records in Russian and Siberian archives—tells the story of Russia’s struggle to master its prison continent as revolution loomed. From the Hardcover edition.

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    The House of the Dead

    17.1 hrs • 1/3/17 • Unabridged
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