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Prejudice & Racism

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  1. 0.6 hrs • 7/12/2016 • Unabridged

    Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson’s interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Based on the critically acclaimed 2016 Caldecott and Sibert Honor Book and winner of the Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Award, Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer’s life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, and strength.

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    Voice of Freedom

    0.6 hrs • 7/12/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 1.1 hrs • 4/5/2016 • Unabridged

    In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give her up bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama. This seemingly small act triggered civil rights protests across America and earned Rosa Parks the title “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement.”

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  3. 3.3 hrs • 8/4/2015 • Unabridged

    What happens when a person’s reputation has been forever damaged? With archival photographs and text among other primary sources, this riveting biography of Mary Mallon by the Sibert medalist and Newbery Honor winner Susan Campbell Bartoletti looks beyond the tabloid scandal of Mary’s controversial life. How she was treated by medical and legal officials reveals a lesser-known story of human and constitutional rights, entangled with the science of pathology and enduring questions about who Mary Mallon really was. How did her name become synonymous with deadly disease? And who is really responsible for the lasting legacy of Typhoid Mary? This thorough exploration includes an author’s note, timeline, annotated source notes, and bibliography.

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    Terrible Typhoid Mary

    3.3 hrs • 8/4/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 0.2 hrs • 6/29/2015 • Unabridged

    An inspiring account of an event that shaped American history Fifty years after her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama city bus, Mrs. Rosa Parks is still one of the most important figures in the American civil rights movement. This tribute to Mrs. Parks is a celebration of her courageous action and the events that followed.

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    Rosa

    0.2 hrs • 6/29/15 • Unabridged
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    3.9 hrs • 8/28/2014 • Unabridged

    Jacqueline Woodson, one of today’s finest writers, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse. Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the civil rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

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    Brown Girl Dreaming

    3.9 hrs • 8/28/14 • Unabridged
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  6. 12.2 hrs • 7/8/2014 • Unabridged

    It’s 1964, and Sunny’s town is being invaded. At least, that’s what the adults of Greenwood, Mississippi, are saying. All Sunny knows is that people from up north are coming to help people register to vote. They’re calling it Freedom Summer. Meanwhile, Sunny can’t help but feel like her house is being invaded, too. She has a new stepmother, a new brother, and a new sister crowding her life, giving her little room to breathe. And things get even trickier when Sunny and her brother are caught sneaking into the local swimming pool—where they bump into a mystery boy whose life is going to become tangled up in theirs. As she did in her groundbreaking documentary novel Countdown, award-winning author Deborah Wiles uses stories and images to tell the riveting story of a certain time and place—and of kids who, in a world where everyone is choosing sides, must figure out how to stand up for themselves and fight for what’s right.

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  7. 0.1 hrs • 6/17/2014 • Unabridged

    On the eve of World War II, African American boxer Joe Louis fought German Max Schmeling in a bout that had more at stake than just the world heavyweight title; for much of America, their fight came to represent America’s war with Germany. This elegant and powerful biography centers around the historic fight in which black and white America were able to put aside prejudice and come together to celebrate our nation’s ideals.

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    A Nation’s Hope

    0.1 hrs • 6/17/14 • Unabridged
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  8. 3.8 hrs • 1/21/2014 • Unabridged

    An astonishing civil rights story from Newbery Honor winner and National Book Award finalist Steve Sheinkin On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked the segregated Navy base at Port Chicago, California, killing more than three hundred sailors who were at the docks, critically injuring off-duty men in their bunks, and shattering windows up to a mile away. On August 9, 244 men refused to go back to work until unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. When the dust settled, fifty were charged with mutiny, facing decades in jail and even execution.  This is a fascinating story of the prejudice that faced black men and women in America’s armed forces during World War II and a nuanced look at those who gave their lives in service of a country where they lacked the most basic rights.

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    The Port Chicago 50

    3.8 hrs • 1/21/14 • Unabridged
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  9. 2.2 hrs • 1/1/2013 • Unabridged

    In early 1968 the grisly on-the-job deaths of two African American sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee, prompted an extended strike by that city’s segregated force of trash collectors. Workers sought union protection, higher wages, improved safety, and the integration of their work force. Their work stoppage became a part of the larger civil rights movement and drew an impressive array of national movement leaders to Memphis, including, on more than one occasion, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. King added his voice to the struggle in what became the final speech of his life. His assassination in Memphis on April 4 sparked protests and violence throughout America and helped force the acceptance of worker demands in Memphis. The sanitation strike ended eight days after King’s death. Marching to the Mountaintop explores how the media, politics, the civil rights movement, and labor protests all converged to set the scene for one of King’s greatest speeches—and for his tragic death.

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    Marching to the Mountaintop

    2.2 hrs • 1/1/13 • Unabridged
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  10. 6.4 hrs • 8/28/2012 • Unabridged

    In 1963, the Civil Rights movement was falling apart. After a series of setbacks across the south, the movement was losing direction and momentum. No southern city was more divided than Birmingham, Alabama, home of the infamous Bull Connor. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. conceived an ingenious plan: fill the Birmingham jails by arranging a series of public protests at which participants would be arrested as a result of their nonviolent action, paralyzing the city and drawing national and world attention to the horrors and injustices of segregation. But the stakes were too high for much adult participant in the movement—job loss, jailing, and quite possibly even death. Instead, against Dr. King’s better judgment, young people led the protests.

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    We’ve Got a Job

    6.4 hrs • 8/28/12 • Unabridged
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  11. 2.4 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Abridged

    For the first time, an edition of Martin Luther King's most important speeches and selected sermons are assembled specifically for school-age-children and families to listen to together. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the 20th Century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights movement and helped change society. Though his speeches refer to the conditions of the 1960s, his assertions that nonviolent protest is the key to democracy and that all humans are equal, are as timeless and powerful today as they were nearly forty years ago. To honor Dr. King, this edition includes Dr. King's recordings, abridged for children, and is commemorated with selected art from our nation's own talent.

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