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Caregiving

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  1. 6.5 hrs • 6/2/2015 • Unabridged

    National Book Award winner Jonathan Kozol is best known for his fifty years of work among our nation’s poorest and most vulnerable children. Now, in the most personal book of his career, he tells the story of his father’s life and work as a nationally noted specialist in disorders of the brain and his astonishing ability, at the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, to explain the causes of his sickness and then to narrate, step-by-step, his slow descent into dementia. Dr. Harry Kozol was born in Boston in 1906. Classically trained at Harvard and Johns Hopkins, he was an unusually intuitive clinician with a special gift for diagnosing interwoven elements of neurological and psychiatric illnesses in highly complicated and creative people. “One of the most intense relationships of his career,” his son recalls, “was with Eugene O’Neill, who moved to Boston in the last years of his life so my father could examine him and talk with him almost every day.” At a later stage in his career, he evaluated criminal defendants, including Patricia Hearst and the Boston Strangler, Albert H. DeSalvo, who described to him in detail what was going through his mind while he was killing thirteen women. But The Theft of Memory is not primarily about a doctor’s public life. The heart of the book lies in the bond between a father and his son and the ways that bond intensified even as Harry’s verbal skills and cogency progressively abandoned him. “Somehow,” the author says, “all those hours that we spent trying to fathom something that he wanted to express, or summon up a vivid piece of seemingly lost memory that still brought a smile to his eyes, left me with a deeper sense of intimate connection with my father than I’d ever felt before.” Lyrical and stirring, The Theft of Memory is at once a tender tribute to a father from his son and a richly colored portrait of a devoted doctor who lived more than a century.

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    The Theft of Memory by Jonathan Kozol

    The Theft of Memory

    6.5 hrs • 6/2/15 • Unabridged
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  2. 6.5 hrs • 7/23/2014 • Unabridged

    More than four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s, and as many as twenty million have close relatives or friends with the disease. Revolutionizing the way we perceive and live with Alzheimer’s, Joanne Koenig Coste offers a practical approach to the emotional well-being of both patients and caregivers that emphasizes relating to patients in their own reality. Her accessible and comprehensive method, which she calls habilitation, works to enhance communication between care partners and patients and has proven successful with thousands of people living with dementia. Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s also offers hundreds of practical tips, including how to cope with the diagnosis and adjust to the disease’s progression;help the patient talk about the illness;face the issue of driving;make meals and bath times as pleasant as possible;adjust room design for the patient’s comfort; anddeal with wandering, paranoia, and aggression.

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    Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s

    6.5 hrs • 7/23/14 • Unabridged
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  3. 12.7 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    “I didn’t expect this.” No one really expects it, but at some time or another, just about everyone has been—or will be—responsible for giving care, for a sustained period, to someone close to them. Gail Sheehy, who has chronicled every major turning point for twentieth-century Americans, as well as reported on everything from politics to sexuality, knows firsthand the trials, fears, and rare joys of caregiving. In Passages in Caregiving, she takes you by the hand and shows you that you will get through this, and you will do the right things. Sheehy identifies eight crucial stages of caregiving and offers insight for successfully navigating each one. With empathy and intelligence, backed by formidable research, and interspersed with poignant stories of her experience and that of other successful caregivers, Passages in Caregiving addresses the needs of this enormous and growing group. It is sure to become the touchstone for this challenging yet deeply rewarding period in your life journey. Providing invaluable advice and guidance, this book examines the arc of caregiving from the first signs of trouble. Sheehy answers the most important questions to consider: How serious is it? What do I ask the doctor? How will this be paid for? What are our options? At the same time she offers new tips and strategies that you won’t find anywhere else. Most important, however, Passages in Caregiving points out that you don’t have to be alone in this process. Included are countless resources and names of advocacy groups that are there to help even the most complicated of situations, many of which are woefully underutilized. With Gail Sheehy as your guide, Passages in Caregiving is sure to help turn a stressful, life-altering situation into a journey that can be safely navigated and from which everyone can benefit.

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    Passages in Caregiving

    12.7 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  4. 15.6 hrs • 4/26/2011 • Unabridged

    In telling the intimate story of caring for her aged and ailing mother, Jane Gross offers indispensable—and often surprising—advice for the rapidly increasing number of adult children responsible for aging parents. Gross deftly weaves the specifics of her personal experience—a widowed mother with mounting health problems, the attendant collision of fear and ignorance, the awkward role reversal of parent and child, unresolved family relationships with her mother and brother, and the conflict between her day job and caregiving—with a comprehensive resource for effectively managing the lives of one’s own parents while keeping sanity and strength intact. Packed with information, A Bittersweet Season explains which questions to ask when looking for a nursing home or assisted living facility; how to unravel the mysteries of Medicare and Medicaid; why finding a new general practitioner should always be the first move when relocating an elderly parent; how to weigh quality against quantity of life when considering medical interventions; why you should always keep a phone charger and an extra pair of glasses in your car; and much more. It also provides astute commentary on a national health care system that has stranded two generations to fend for themselves at this most difficult of times. No less important are the lessons of the human spirit that Gross learned in the last years of her mother’s life, and afterward, when writing for the New York Times and The New Old Age, a blog she launched for the newspaper. Calling upon firsthand experience and extensive reporting, Gross recounts a story of grace and compassion in the midst of a crisis that shows us how the end of one life presents a bittersweet opportunity to heal old wounds and find out what we are made of. Wise, unflinching, and ever helpful, A Bittersweet Season is an essential guide for anyone navigating this unfamiliar, psychologically demanding, powerfully emotional, and often redemptive territory.

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    A Bittersweet Season

    15.6 hrs • 4/26/11 • Unabridged
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  5. 6.5 hrs • 8/1/2008 • Unabridged

    For ourselves and for our loved ones—compassion and reassurance along with direct, honest fact. While every one of us hopes to “die well,” this may not be possible without knowing our rights about care at the end of life. – How can futile medical treatment be stopped?– When might death be hastened?– How can each of us retain control of these decisions? The information in To Die Well is both comforting and empowering. Knowing our rights to refuse treatment, as well as legal ways to bring about death if pain or distress cannot be alleviated, will spare us the frightening helplessness that can rob our last days of meaning and connection with others. Doctors Sidney Wanzer and Joseph Glenmullen do not shy away from controversy. They make clear what patients should expect of their doctors, including the right to sufficient pain medication even if it shortens life. They distinguish between normal sadness and depression. They also explain the ways to hasten death that are legal and possible for anyone, and those that require a doctor’s help.

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    To Die Well

    6.5 hrs • 8/1/08 • Unabridged
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  6. 9.9 hrs • 6/1/2007 • Unabridged

    An acclaimed biographer, Lauren Kessler immerses herself in her work to construct compelling portraits of her subjects. In Dancing with Rose, she recounts her time at a West Coast Alzheimer’s facility. Working as an unskilled resident assistant, Kessler learns important lessons about humanity while conducting interviews with patients in various stages of the disease.

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    Dancing with Rose

    9.9 hrs • 6/1/07 • Unabridged
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