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Health Care Delivery

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  1. 1.7 hrs • 10/13/2015 • Unabridged

    A Pulitzer Prize-winning author and one of the world’s premiere cancer researchers reveals an urgent philosophy on the little-known principles that govern medicine—and how understanding these principles can empower us all. Over a decade ago, when Siddhartha Mukherjee was a young, exhausted, and isolated medical resident, he discovered a book that would forever change the way he understood the medical profession. The book, The Youngest Science, forced Dr. Mukherjee to ask himself an urgent, fundamental question: Is medicine a “science”? Sciences must have laws—statements of truth based on repeated experiments that describe some universal attribute of nature. But does medicine have laws like other sciences? Dr. Mukherjee has spent his career pondering this question—a question that would ultimately produce some of most serious thinking he would do around the tenets of his discipline—culminating in The Laws of Medicine. In this important treatise, he investigates the most perplexing and illuminating cases of his career that ultimately led him to identify the three key principles that govern medicine. Brimming with fascinating historical details and modern medical wonders, this important book is a fascinating glimpse into the struggles and eureka moments that people outside of the medical profession rarely see. Written with Dr. Mukherjee’s signature eloquence and passionate prose, The Laws of Medicine is a critical read, not just for those in the medical profession, but for everyone who is moved to better understand how their health and well-being is being treated. Ultimately, this book lays the groundwork for a new way of understanding medicine, now and into the future.

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    The Laws of Medicine

    1.7 hrs • 10/13/15 • Unabridged
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  2. 5.8 hrs • 9/14/2015 • Unabridged

    Surviving non-Hodgkins lymphoma, melanoma, and prostate cancer, former White House chief-of-staff Hamilton Jordan shares his personal and political reflections—from his experiences with the Civil Rights movement to his civilian volunteer tour in Vietnam, from his years of scrutiny under the Carter administration to his agonizing, yet triumphant times battling cancer. Quickly motivated to accept cancer as a fact in his life, Jordan deals with the stages of the disease, “Denial? Deny what? I’ve got a mass in my chest the size of an apple … Angry? At whom? I have lived a great life and have been blessed with much more than I deserve … ‘Why me?’ but ‘Why not me?’ … Bargaining with God? The God that I believe in has all the cards.” Serving as an inspiration to others, Jordan stresses the importance of becoming proactive and maintaining a positive attitude in the face of a terminal disease. The warm voice of narrator Tom Stechschulte gives us an intimate portrait of this tireless public servant and crusader.

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    No Such Thing as a Bad Day

    Foreword by Jimmy Carter
    5.8 hrs • 9/14/15 • Unabridged
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  3. 17.2 hrs • 1/5/2015 • Unabridged

    America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the health-care industry. It’s a fly-on-the-wall account of the titanic fight to pass a 961-page law aimed at fixing America’s largest, most dysfunctional industry. It’s a penetrating chronicle of how the profiteering that Brill first identified in his trailblazing Time magazine cover story continues, despite Obamacare. And it is the first complete, inside account of how President Obama persevered to push through the law but then failed to deal with the staff incompetence and turf wars that crippled its implementation. By chance America’s Bitter Pill ends up being much more—because as Brill was completing this book, he had to undergo urgent open-heart surgery. Thus, this also becomes the story of how one patient who thinks he knows everything about health-care “policy” rethinks it from a hospital gurney—and combines that insight with his brilliant reporting. The result: a surprising new vision of how we can fix American health care so that it stops draining the bank accounts of our families and our businesses and the federal treasury.

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    America’s Bitter Pill

    17.2 hrs • 1/5/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 6.5 hrs • 7/23/2014 • Unabridged

    More than four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s, and as many as twenty million have close relatives or friends with the disease. Revolutionizing the way we perceive and live with Alzheimer’s, Joanne Koenig Coste offers a practical approach to the emotional well-being of both patients and caregivers that emphasizes relating to patients in their own reality. Her accessible and comprehensive method, which she calls habilitation, works to enhance communication between care partners and patients and has proven successful with thousands of people living with dementia. Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s also offers hundreds of practical tips, including how to cope with the diagnosis and adjust to the disease’s progression;help the patient talk about the illness;face the issue of driving;make meals and bath times as pleasant as possible;adjust room design for the patient’s comfort; anddeal with wandering, paranoia, and aggression.

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    Learning to Speak Alzheimer’s

    6.5 hrs • 7/23/14 • Unabridged
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  5. 7.3 hrs • 6/1/2014 • Unabridged

    A bold new remedy for the sprawling and wasteful health care industry Where else but the doctor’s office do you have to fill out a form on a clipboard? Have you noticed that hospital bills are almost unintelligible, except for the absurdly high dollar amount? Why is it that technology in other industries drives prices down, but in health care it’s the reverse? And why, in health care, is the customer so often treated as a mere bystander—and an ignorant one at that? The same American medical establishment that saves lives and performs wondrous miracles is also a $2.7 trillion industry in deep dysfunction. And now, with the Affordable Care Act, it is called on to extend full benefits to tens of millions of newly insured. You might think that this would leave us with a bleak choice—either to devote more of our national budget to health care or to make do with less of it. But there’s another path. In this provocative book, Jonathan Bush, cofounder and CEO of athenahealth, calls for a revolution in health care to give customers more choices, freedom, power, and information, and at far lower prices. With humor and a tell-it-like-it-is style, he picks up insights and ideas from his days as an ambulance driver in New Orleans, an army medic, and an entrepreneur launching a birthing start-up in San Diego. In struggling to save that dying business, Bush’s team created a software program that eventually became athenahealth, a cloud-based services company that handles electronic medical records, billing, and patient communications for more than fifty thousand medical providers nationwide. Bush calls for disruption of the status quo through new business models, new payment models, and new technologies that give patients more control of their care and enhance the physician/patient experience. He shows how this is already happening. From birthing centers in Florida to urgent care centers in West Virginia, upstarts are disrupting health care by focusing on efficiency, innovation, and customer service. Bush offers a vision and plan for change while bringing a breakthrough perspective to the debates surrounding Obamacare. You’ll learn how: Well-intended government regulations prop up overpriced incumbents and slow the pace of innovation. Focused, profit-driven disrupters are chipping away at the dominance of hospitals by offering routine procedures at lower cost. Scrappy digital start-ups are equipping providers and patients with new apps and technologies to access medical data and take control of care. Making informed choices about the care we receive and pay for will enable a more humane and satisfying health care system to emerge. Bush’s plan calls for Americans not only to demand more from providers but also to accept more responsibility for our health, to weigh risks and make hard choices—in short, to take back control of an industry that is central to our lives and our economy.

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    Where Does It Hurt?

    7.3 hrs • 6/1/14 • Unabridged
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  6. 13.2 hrs • 7/2/2013 • Unabridged

    In the spirit of Oliver Sacks’ Awakenings and the TV series House, Dr. Eric Manheimer’s Twelve Patients is a memoir from the Medical Director of Bellevue Hospital that uses the plights of twelve very different patients—from dignitaries at the nearby UN, to supermax prisoners from Riker’s Island, to illegal immigrants, and Wall Street tycoons—to illustrate larger societal issues. Manheimer is not only the medical director of the country’s oldest public hospital, but he is also a patient. As the audiobook unfolds, the narrator is diagnosed with cancer, and he is forced to wrestle with the end of his own life even as he struggles to save the lives of others.

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    Twelve Patients

    13.2 hrs • 7/2/13 • Unabridged
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    9.7 hrs • 4/1/2013 • Unabridged

    Conflicts of interest, misrepresentation of clinical trials, hospital price-fixing, and massive expenditures for procedures of dubious efficacy—these and other critical flaws leave little doubt that the current US health-care system is in need of an overhaul. In this essential guide, preeminent physician Nortin Hadler urges American health-care consumers to take time to understand the existing system and to visualize what the outcome of successful reform might look like. Central to this vision is a shared understanding of the primacy of the relationship between doctor and patient. Hadler shows us that a new approach is necessary if we hope to improve the health of the populace. Rational health care, he argues, is far less expensive than the irrationality of the status quo. Taking a critical view of how medical treatment, health care finance, and attitudes about health, medicine, and disease play out in broad social and political settings, Hadler applies his wealth of experience and insight to these pressing issues, answering important questions for citizen-patients and policy makers alike.

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    The Citizen Patient by Nortin M. Hadler, MD

    The Citizen Patient

    9.7 hrs • 4/1/13 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
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  8. 9.9 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    A medical mistake during an IVF procedure. An unthinkable situation … you’re pregnant with the wrong baby. You can terminate, but you can’t keep him. What choice would you make? Carolyn and Sean Savage had been trying to expand their family for years. When they underwent an IVF transfer in February 2009, they knew it would be their last chance. If they became pregnant, they would celebrate the baby as an answer to their prayers. If not, they would be grateful for the family they had and leave their fertility struggles behind forever. They never imagined a third option. The pregnancy test was positive, but the clinic had transferred the wrong embryos. Carolyn was pregnant with someone else’s baby. The Savages faced a series of heartbreaking decisions: terminate the pregnancy, sue for custody, or hand over the infant to his genetic parents upon delivery. Knowing that Carolyn was carrying another couple’s hope for a baby, the Savages wanted to do what they prayed the other family would do for them if the situation was reversed. Sean and Carolyn Savage decided to give the ultimate gift, the gift of life, to a family they didn’t know, no strings attached. Inconceivable provides an inside look at how modern medicine, which creates miracles daily, could allow such a tragic mistake, and the many legal ramifications that ensued with both the genetic family and the clinic. Chronicling their tumultuous pregnancy and its aftermath, which tested the Savage’s faith, their relationship to their church, and their marriage, Inconceivable is ultimately a testament to love. Carolyn and Sean loved this baby, making it impossible for them to imagine how they could give him life and then give him away. In the end, Inconceivable is a story of what it is to be a parent, someone who nurtures a life, protects a soul, only to release that child into the world long before you’re ready to let him go.

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    Inconceivable

    9.9 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  9. 5.3 hrs • 4/24/2012 • Unabridged

    America’s ever-expanding waistline—we see it, we hear about it, and we worry about it, but can anything be done about it? We know all the usual suspects: red meat, dairy, white flour, refined sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, a lack of exercise, too much television, and the list goes on and on. It seems simple, right? Not really. There’s a lot more going on below the surface when it comes to what America is eating for dinner—and breakfast and lunch and in between. People today work harder and take better care of their health than any previous generation. So how could two-thirds of us fail to measure up when it comes to eating right and exercising? HBO and the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine have joined together to bring you the nation’s foremost experts and definitive research on weight and weight loss. The Weight of the Nation digs deep to uncover what’s going on in our minds, in our stomachs, in corporate America, on our farms, and in society’s overall love of food. The solution to America’s obesity epidemic will not come from quick-fix diets or a new national obsession with working out. The answer will only come from learning more about how our bodies conserve energy, why we seek out and consume certain foods, and how our world compels us to eat a lot more and move a lot less than we should. Three years in the making, The Weight of the Nation answers such crucial questions as: –Is there such a thing as the right diet? –Am I doomed to yo-yo for the rest of my life? –How does stress affect my weight? –Is my slow metabolism making me fat? –How does carrying too much weight affect my health? –Why do I eat junk food even though I know it’s unhealthy? –Is exercise enough to help most people maintain an ideal weight? –How can I keep weight off forever? The Weight of the Nation provides you with all the tools you need—and gives you the power to better understand your relationships with food and physical activity—so you can change the way you eat and move for the rest of your life.

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    The Weight of the Nation

    By John Hoffman and Judith A. Salerno, MD, MS, with Alexandra Moss
    5.3 hrs • 4/24/12 • Unabridged
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  10. 10.4 hrs • 4/30/2010 • Unabridged

    After a year-long political war, in March 2010 President Obama and the Democratic leaders of Congress achieved a victory that has eluded lawmakers for seventy-five years: an overhaul of America’s health-care system. In this indispensable book, the staff of the Washington Post tells the story of health-care reform and explains what it means for the American people. In the book’s first section, the Washington Post’s reporter embedded in the White House provides a behind-the-scenes narrative of how Obama and the Democrats pushed through health-care reform in the face of nearly unanimous Republican opposition. This section traces the tortured evolution of the legislation, showing how the Senate killed the public option, how the January 2010 victory of Republican senator Scott Brown left the Democrats scrambling, and how Democratic leaders ultimately negotiated among entrenched political factions—including disillusioned Democrats—to reach a compromise. What does this final package include? The book’s second section provides an accessible summary of the legislation that Obama signed into law in March 2010. In the third section, Washington Post writers answer the most pressing questions about the health-care legislation’s immediate impact. Most importantly, how will the new bill affect individuals—small-business owners, uninsured Americans with pre-existing conditions, and twenty-somethings on their parents’ policies? This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how this legislation came into being and what the new health-care program means.

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    Landmark by the Staff of the Washington Post

    Landmark

    10.4 hrs • 4/30/10 • Unabridged
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  11. 14.6 hrs • 6/2/2008 • Unabridged

    In 2005 Maimonides Hospital in Brooklyn, New York, unveiled a new state-of-the-art, multimillion-dollar cancer center. Determined to understand the whole spectrum of factors that determine what kind of medical care people receive in this country, bestselling author Julie Salamon spent one year tracking the progess of the center and getting to know the characters who make the hospital run. Located in a community where sixty-seven different languages are spoken, Maimonides is a case study for the particular kinds of concerns that arise in institutions that serve an increasingly multicultural American demographic. Granted astonishing access by the hospital higher-ups, Salamon followed the doctors, patients, administrators, nurses, ambulance drivers, cooks, and cleaning staff. She explored not just the action on the ground but also the financial, ethical, technological, socioloical, and cultural matters that the hospital commuity encounters every day. Drawing on her skills as interviewer, observer, and social critic, Salamon presents the story of modern medicine. She draws out the internal and external political machinations that exist between doctors and staff as well as between hospital and community. And she grounds the science and emotion of medical drama in the financial realities of operating a huge, private institution that must contend with such issues as adapting to the specific needs of immigrant groups that make up a large and growing portion of our society. Salamon exposes struggles both profound and humdrum: bitter internal feuds, warm personal connections, comedy, egoism, greed, love, and loss; rabbinic edicts to contend with, as well as imams, herbalists, and local politicians; system foul-ups, shortages of everything except forms to fill out, recalcitrant and greedy insurance reimbursement systems, and the surprising difficulty of getting doctors to wash their hands. This is the dynamic universe of small and large concerns and personalities that, taken together, determine the nature of our care.

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    Hospital

    14.6 hrs • 6/2/08 • Unabridged
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  12. 10.0 hrs • 6/28/2005 • Unabridged

    It was the most radical human-breeding experiment in American history, and no one knew how it turned out. The Repository for Germinal Choice—nicknamed the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank—opened to notorious fanfare in 1980, and for two decades, women flocked to it from all over the country to choose a sperm donor from its roster of Nobel-laureate scientists, mathematical prodigies, successful businessmen, and star athletes. But the bank quietly closed its doors in 1999, its founder dead, its confidential records sealed, and the fate of its children and donors unknown. In early 2001, award-winning columnist David Plotz set out to solve the mystery of the Nobel Prize sperm bank. Plotz wrote an article for Slate inviting readers to contact him—confidentially—if they knew anything about the bank. The next morning, he received an email response, then another, and another—each person desperate to talk about something they had kept hidden for years. Now, in The Genius Factory, Plotz unfolds the full and astonishing story of the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank and its founder’s radical scheme to change our world. Believing America was facing genetic catastrophe, Robert Graham, an eccentric millionaire, decided he could reverse the decline by artificially inseminating women with the sperm of geniuses. In February 1980, Graham opened the Repository for Germinal Choice and stocked it with the seed of gifted scientists, inventors, and thinkers. Over the next nineteen years, Graham’s “genius factory” produced more than two hundred children. What happened to them? Were they the brilliant offspring that Graham expected? Did any of the “superman” fathers care about the unknown sons and daughters who bore their genes? What were the mothers like?  Crisscrossing the country and logging countless hours online, Plotz succeeded in tracking down previously unknown family members—teenage half-brothers who ended up following vastly different paths, mothers who had wondered for years about the identities of the donors they had selected on the basis of code names and brief character profiles, fathers who were proud or ashamed or simply curious about the children who had been created from their sperm samples.  The children of the “genius factory” are messengers from the future—a future that is bearing down on us fast. What will families be like when parents routinely “shop” for their kids’ genes? What will children be like when they’re programmed for greatness? In this stunning, eye-opening book, one of our finest young journalists previews America’s coming age of genetic expectations.

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    The Genius Factory

    10.0 hrs • 6/28/05 • Unabridged
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  13. 7.6 hrs • 3/1/2004 • Unabridged

    In this beautiful book, Elizabeth Cohen gives us a true and moving portrait of the love and courage of a family. Elizabeth is a member of the “sandwich generation”—people caught in the middle of simultaneously caring for their children and for their aging parents. She is the mother of Ava and the daughter of Daddy, and she’s responsible for both of them. Hers is the story of a woman’s struggle to keep her family whole, to raise her child in a house of laughter and love, and to keep her father from hiding the house keys in his slippers. In this story full of everyday triumphs, Elizabeth—a suddenly single mother with a career, a mortgage, and a hamper of laundry—finds her world spiraling out of control yet full of beauty. Faced with mounting disasters, she chooses to confront life head on.

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    The House on Beartown Road by Elizabeth Cohen

    The House on Beartown Road

    7.6 hrs • 3/1/04 • Unabridged
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  14. 3.0 hrs • 2/17/2004 • Abridged

    “Help me, Dr. Dean! I want to be healthy, but I just don’t know where to turn for advice.” No wonder. How often have you felt whipsawed by the experts, confused by conflicting advice, or torn with guilt over what you eat, drink, and think? Prepare yourself for a shock: you can relax, enjoy life, and still be healthy. Renowned for candid straight talk on radio and television, Dr. Dean Edell applies his unique common-sense perspective to America’s growing obsession with health. Frank and iconoclastic, Dr. Edell walks readers through a lifetime of experience from deep inside the twin worlds of media and medicine. As one of the first media doctors, he knows better than anyone the dangers of distorted medical reporting. With colorful detail, he shows how medical consumers are made neurotic at a time when people are healthier than ever before. Dr. Edell sorts through the morass of research, distinguishing fact from panic-inducing fiction. With trademark humor, grace, and style, he shares with us the essential reassuring facts about our health: you can be fatter than you think; too much exercise might kill you; and yes, sex will add years to your life!

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    Eat, Drink, and Be Merry

    By Dean Edell, MD, with David Schrieberg
    3.0 hrs • 2/17/04 • Abridged
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  15. 4.8 hrs • 10/22/2002 • Abridged

    In this remarkable memoir, Hamilton Jordan recounts his adventures in both the political arena and the world of modern cancer treatment. The political stories are fascinating—but it is when he talks of his cancers that Jordan achieves his real impact. For this is not a story about medical miracles. It’s about how a patient defeats cancer by taking charge of his own treatment and becoming a well-informed partner in his cure.

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    No Such Thing as a Bad Day

    4.8 hrs • 10/22/02 • Abridged
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