13 Results for:


  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 13 of 13
  1. 11.1 hrs • 7/7/2015 • Unabridged

    This is the first biography of Ralph Peer, the adventurous—even revolutionary—A&R man and music publisher who saw the universal power locked in regional roots music and tapped it, changing the breadth and flavor of popular music around the world. It is the story of the life and fifty-year career, from the age of cylinder recordings to the stereo era, of the man who pioneered the recording, marketing, and publishing of blues, jazz, country, gospel, and Latin music. The book tracks Peer’s role in such breakthrough events as the recording of Mamie Smith’s “Crazy Blues” (the record that sparked the blues craze), the first country recording sessions with Fiddlin’ John Carson, his discovery of Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family at the famed Bristol sessions, the popularizing of Latin American music during World War II, and the postwar transformation of music on the airwaves that set the stage for the dominance of R&B, country, and rock ’n’ roll. But this is also the story of a man from humble Midwestern beginnings who went on to build the world’s largest independent music publishing firm, fostering the global reach of music that had previously been specialized, localized, and marginalized. Ralph Peer redefined the ways promising songs and performers were identified, encouraged, and promoted; rethought how far regional music might travel; and changed our very notions of what pop music can be.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Ralph Peer and the Making of Popular Roots Music by Barry Mazor

    Ralph Peer and the Making of Popular Roots Music

    Introduction read by Marty Stuart
    11.1 hrs • 7/7/15 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  2. 0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
    12.6 hrs • 10/23/2014 • Unabridged

    The long-awaited memoir by one of the most influential and beloved musicians of our time In Herbie Hancock, the legendary jazz musician and composer reflects on a thriving career that has spanned seven decades. A true innovator, Hancock has had an enormous influence on both acoustic and electric jazz, R&B, and hip-hop with his ongoing exploration of different musical genres, garnering fourteen Grammy Awards along the way. From his beginnings as a child prodigy to his work in Miles Davis’ second great quintet, from his innovations as the leader of his own groundbreaking sextet to his collaborations with everyone from Wayne Shorter to Joni Mitchell and Stevie Wonder, Herbie Hancock reveals the method behind Hancock’s undeniable musical genius. Hancock discusses his musical influences, colorful behind-the-scenes stories, his long and happy marriage, and how Buddhism inspires him creatively and personally. Honest, enlightening, and as electrifyingly vital as the man who wrote it, Herbie Hancock promises to be an invaluable contribution to jazz literature and a must-read for fans and music lovers.

    Available Formats: Download

    Herbie Hancock

    By Herbie Hancock, with Lisa Dickey
    12.6 hrs • 10/23/14 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4.4 4 out of 5 stars 4.4/5
  3. 1 reviews 0 5 4.7 4 out of 5 stars 4.7/5 (1)
    9.9 hrs • 1/1/2014 • Unabridged

    Kansas City Lightning: The Rise and Times of Charlie Parker is the first installment in the long-awaited portrait of one of the most talented and influential musicians of the twentieth century, from Stanley Crouch, one of the foremost authorities on jazz and culture in America. Throughout his life, Charlie Parker personified the tortured American artist: a revolutionary performer who used his alto saxophone to create a new music known as bebop even as he wrestled with a drug addiction that would lead to his death at the age of thirty-four. Drawing on interviews with peers, collaborators, and family members, Kansas City Lightning re-creates Parker’s Depression-era childhood; his early days navigating the Kansas City nightlife, inspired by lions like Lester Young and Count Basie; and on to New York, where he began to transcend the music he had mastered. Crouch reveals an ambitious young man torn between music and drugs, between his domineering mother and his impressionable young wife, whose teenage romance with Charlie lies at the bittersweet heart of this story. With the wisdom of a jazz scholar, the cultural insights of an acclaimed social critic, and the narrative skill of a literary novelist, Stanley Crouch illuminates this American master as never before.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Kansas City Lightning by Stanley Crouch

    Kansas City Lightning

    9.9 hrs • 1/1/14 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 4.7 4 out of 5 stars 4.7/5 (1)
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  4. 17.7 hrs • 10/17/2013 • Unabridged

    A major new biography of Duke Ellington from the acclaimed author of Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington was the greatest jazz composer of the twentieth century—and an impenetrably enigmatic personality whom no one, not even his closest friends, claimed to understand. The grandson of a slave, he dropped out of high school to become one of the world’s most famous musicians, a showman of incomparable suavity who was as comfortable in Carnegie Hall as in the nightclubs where he honed his style. He wrote some fifteen hundred compositions, many of which, like “Mood Indigo” and “Sophisticated Lady,” remain beloved standards, and he sought inspiration in an endless string of transient lovers, concealing his inner self behind a smiling mask of flowery language and ironic charm. As the biographer of Louis Armstrong, Terry Teachout is uniquely qualified to tell the story of the public and private lives of Duke Ellington. Duke peels away countless layers of Ellington’s evasion and public deception to tell the unvarnished truth about the creative genius who inspired Miles Davis to say, “All the musicians should get together one certain day and get down on their knees and thank Duke.”

    Available Formats: Download


    17.7 hrs • 10/17/13 • Unabridged
  5. 1.0 hrs • 4/1/2013 • Unabridged

    Veteran radio producer Joe Bevilacqua hosts this entertaining, informative hour, recorded in the French Quarter of New Orleans and featuring jazz great Wynton Marsalis, jazz author and historian Donald Newlove, WNYC Radio talk show host Leonard Lopate, members of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and others. They discuss the origins of jazz and the life and music of legendary trumpeter Louis Armstrong. Also featured is the music of Armstrong throughout his long career and some rare recordings, including audio from a 1957 CBS television documentary with Edward R. Murrow.

    Available Formats: Download
  6. 9.2 hrs • 3/19/2013 • Unabridged

    Beautiful, romantic and spirited, Pannonica, known as Nica, named after her father’s favorite moth, was born in 1913 to extraordinary, eccentric privilege, and a storied history. The Rothschild family had, in only five generations, risen from the ghetto in Frankfurt to stately homes in England. As a child, Nica took her daily walks, dressed in white, with her two sisters and governess around the parkland of the vast house at Tring, Hertfordshire, among kangaroos, giant tortoises, emus, and zebras, all part of the exotic menagerie collected by her uncle Walter. As a debutante, she was taught to fly by a saxophonist and introduced to jazz by her brother Victor. She married Baron Jules de Koenigswarter, settled in a château in France and had five children. When World War II broke out, Nica and her five children narrowly escaped back to England, but soon after, she set out to find her husband who was fighting with the Free French Army in Africa, where she helped the war effort by being a decoder, a driver and organizing supplies and equipment. In the early 1950s Nica heard “‘Round Midnight” by the jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk and, as if under a powerful spell, abandoned her marriage and moved to New York to find him. She devoted herself to helping Monk and other musicians: she bailed them out of jail, paid their bills, took them to the hospital, even drove them to their gigs, and her convertible Bentley could always be seen parked outside downtown clubs or up in Harlem. Charlie Parker would notoriously die in her apartment in the Stanhope Hotel. But it was Monk who was the love of her life and whom she cared for until his death in 1982. Hannah Rothschild has drawn on archival material and her own interviews in this quest to find out who her great-aunt really was and how she fit into a family that, although passionate about music and entomology, was reactionary in always favoring men over women. Part musical odyssey, part love story, The Baroness is a fascinating portrait of a modern figure ahead of her time who dared to live as she wanted, finally, at the very center of New York’s jazz scene.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Baroness

    9.2 hrs • 3/19/13 • Unabridged
  7. 15.8 hrs • 8/1/2012 • Unabridged

    Long before the success of his bossa nova Grammy winner “The Girl from Ipanema,” Stan Getz was a fixture in the pantheon of jazz greats. From his recording of “Early Autumn” with the Woody Herman band in 1949, which catapulted him to stardom at age twenty-two, to the 1961 jazz/classical masterpiece “Focus,” to the 1990 release of “Apasionado,” Getz’s forty-nine-year career is a tale of enduring artistic success in the midst of a troubled life. Getz struggled with heroin addiction until the age of twenty-seven and violent alcoholism until the last decade of his life, which led him into trouble with the law and marred his relationships with family and friends. Yet despite his self-destructive behavior, he was still creating gorgeous music at the time of his death from cancer in 1991. Maggin’s biography captures both the jazz legend and the troubled man with eloquence, honesty, and compassion.

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental

    Stan Getz

    15.8 hrs • 8/1/12 • Unabridged
    Also: Digital Rental
  8. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    17.8 hrs • 1/20/2012 • Unabridged

    No singer has been more mythologized and more misunderstood than jazz legend Billie Holiday, who helped to create much of the mystique herself with her autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues. This authentic biography sets the record straight. Donald Clarke was given unrivaled access to a treasure trove of interviews from the 1970s with those who knew Lady Day in all stages of her short, tragic life—from her childhood in the streets and good-time houses of Baltimore, through the early days of success in New York and the years of fame, to her tragic decline and death at the age of forty-four. This biography separates fact from fiction to reveal the true Billie Holiday.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Wishing on the Moon by Donald Clarke

    Wishing on the Moon

    17.8 hrs • 1/20/12 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    Also: CD, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  9. 8.2 hrs • 4/1/2006 • Unabridged

    Miles to Go is a frank and intimate exploration of Miles Davis’ eccentric working life, drug habits, paranoia, depression, and subsequent recovery. Murphy explores Davis’ troubled relationship with his children and the controversial role Cicely Tyson played in his life. The book also delves into the dynamics that made Davis’ band work so well together, placing Davis’ work in a historic, literary, and musical framework. Willie Nelson, Mick Jagger, Jimi Hendrix, and even Mother Teresa all have walk-on parts in this engaging, intelligent, and often hilarious narrative. Miles to Go takes us from the small, seedy jazz clubs that Davis frequented to the world tours and then finally to Davis’ triumphant return with his celebrated concerts at Lincoln Center in the early 1980s.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Miles to Go by Chris Murphy

    Miles to Go

    8.2 hrs • 4/1/06 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  10. 7.8 hrs • 4/1/2006 • Unabridged

    In this collection of musical portraits, jazz pianist and radio host Marian McPartland pays sparkling tribute to such beloved and legendary figures as Benny Goodman, Bill Evans, Joe Morello, Paul Desmond, Alec Wilder, Mary Lou Williams, and others. In a preface to this new edition, published originally as All in Good Time, McPartland extends her commentary to include details of her long-running National Public Radio show Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz and memories of her late husband, famed Chicago trumpeter Jimmy McPartland.  Bonus Feature! This recording includes special excerpts from Marian’s highly successful program, Marian McPartland Piano Jazz, featuring interviews with Rosemary Clooney, Bill Evans, Oscar Peterson, and Mary Lou Williams.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    Marian McPartland’s Jazz World by Marian McPartland

    Marian McPartland’s Jazz World

    7.8 hrs • 4/1/06 • Unabridged
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  11. 8.0 hrs • 9/1/2003 • Unabridged

    Jazz 101 is a fascinating entrée into the world of jazz, for the beginner, novice, or jazz enthusiast. Szwed takes listeners on a tour of the varied and nonlinear history of jazz, exploring how it developed from an ethnic music to become America’s most popular music and then part of the avant-garde in less than fifty years. Szwed’s complete overview includes the major types of jazz and significant jazz musicians of the twentieth century; the roots of jazz, including its European and African influences; and recommended listening, plus appendixes on jazz singers, record guides, and more. Infinitely readable and highly entertaining, Jazz 101 is a vital tool in understanding and appreciating jazz.

    Available Formats: CD, MP3 CD

    Jazz 101

    8.0 hrs • 9/1/03 • Unabridged
    Also: MP3 CD
  12. 9.0 hrs • 11/7/2000 • Abridged

    Continuing in the tradition of their critically acclaimed works, Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns vividly bring to life the story of the quintessential American music—jazz. Born in the black community of turn-of-the-century New Orleans but played from the beginning by musicians of every color, jazz celebrates all Americans at their best.Here are the stories of the extraordinary men and women who made the music: Louis Armstrong, the fatherless waif whose unrivaled genius helped turn jazz into a soloist's art and influenced every singer, every instrumentalist who came after him; Duke Ellington, the pampered son of middle-class parents who turned a whole orchestra into his personal instrument, wrote nearly two thousand pieces for it, and captured more of American life than any other composer. Bix Beiderbecke, the doomed cornet prodigy who showed white musicians that they too could make an important contribution to the music; Benny Goodman, the immigrants' son who learned the clarinet to help feed his family, but who grew up to teach a whole country how to dance; Billie Holiday, whose distinctive style routinely transformed mediocre music into great art; Charlie Parker, who helped lead a musical revolution, only to destroy himself at thirty-four; and Miles Davis, whose search for fresh ways to sound made him the most influential jazz musician of his generation, and then led him to abandon jazz altogether. Buddy Bolden, Jelly Roll Morton, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Tatum, Count Basie, Dave Brubeck, Artie Shaw, and Ella Fitzgerald are all here; so are Sidney Bechet, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, and a host of others.But Jazz is more than mere biography. The history of the music echoes the history of twentieth-century America. Jazz provided the background for the giddy era that F. Scott Fitzgerald called the Jazz Age. The irresistible pulse of big-band swing lifted the spirits and boosted American morale during the Great Depression and World War II. The virtuosic, demanding style called bebop mirrored the stepped-up pace and dislocation that came with peace. During the Cold War era, jazz served as a propaganda weapon—and forged links with the burgeoning counterculture. The story of jazz encompasses the story of American courtship and show business; the epic growth of great cities—New Orleans and Chicago, Kansas City and New York—and the struggle for civil rights and simple justice that continues into the new millennium.

    Available Formats: Download


    9.0 hrs • 11/7/00 • Abridged
  13. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    16.9 hrs • 9/15/1990 • Unabridged

    Universally acclaimed as a musical genius, Miles Davis was one of the most important and influential musicians in the world. Here, Miles speaks out about his extraordinary life. Miles: The Autobiography, like Miles himself, holds nothing back. For the first time Miles talks about his five-year silence, he speaks frankly and openly about his drug problem and how he overcame it, he condemns the racism he encountered in the music business and in American society in general, and he discusses the women in his life. But above all, Miles talks about music and musicians, including the legends he has played with over the years: Bird, Dizzy, Monk, Trane, Mingus, and many others.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, Digital Rental
    Miles by Miles Davis


    By Miles Davis, with Quincy Troupe
    Read by Dion Graham
    16.9 hrs • 9/15/90 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Also: CD, Digital Rental
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions