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Fish

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  1. 14.2 hrs • 6/29/2016 • Unabridged

    The Founding Fish is the shad, and John McPhee’s veneration for it is both scientific and culinary. McPhee was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Annals of the Former World. Noted for his accessible and perceptive studies of the physical world, he weaves together strands of personal, natural, and national history in this absorbing study that traces the shad’s importance from the seventeenth century to his family’s dinner table.

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    The Founding Fish

    14.2 hrs • 6/29/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 6.3 hrs • 6/26/2014 • Unabridged

    Bestselling author of Four Fish, Paul Greenberg looks to New York oysters, gulf shrimp, and Alaskan salmon to tell the surprising story of why Americans no longer eat from local waters. In 2005, the United States imported twelve billion dollars worth of seafood—nearly double what we had imported ten years earlier. During that same period, our seafood exports rose by a third. In American Catch, our foremost fish expert Paul Greenberg reveals how it came to be that ninety-one percent of the seafood Americans eat is foreign. As recently as 1928, the average New Yorker ate six hundred local oysters a year. Today, the only edible oysters lie outside city limits. Looking at the trail of environmental desecration, Greenberg comes to view the New York City oyster as a reminder of what is lost when local waters are not valued as a food source. To understand the complications of our current moment, Greenberg visits the Gulf of Mexico. He arrives expecting to learn of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s lingering effects on shrimpers but instead finds that the more immediate threat to business comes from overseas. Asian farmed shrimp—cheap, abundant, and a perfect vehicle for the frying and sauces Americans love—have flooded the American market. Finally, Greenberg visits Bristol Bay, Alaska, home to the biggest wild salmon run left in the world. A pristine, productive fishery, Bristol Bay is now at great risk: the proposed Pebble Mine project directly endangers the sockeye salmon’s habitat. In his search to discover why this precious renewable resource isn’t better protected, Greenberg discovers a shocking truth: seventy percent of all Alaskan salmon is sent out of the country, much of it to Asia. Sockeye salmon is arguably the most nutritionally dense animal protein on the planet, yet Americans are shipping it abroad. Despite the challenges, hope abounds. In New York, Greenberg connects with an oyster restoration project with a vision for how the bivalves might save the city from rising tides; in the gulf, shrimpers band together to offer local catch direct to consumers. And in Bristol Bay, fishermen, environmentalists, and local Alaskans gather to roadblock Pebble Mine. In American Catch Paul Greenberg proposes there is a way to break the current destructive patterns of consumption and return the American catch back to American consumers.

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    American Catch

    6.3 hrs • 6/26/14 • Unabridged
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  3. 9.3 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    Biologist and extreme angler Jeremy Wade is well known for his extremely popular River Monsters program, the most successful show in Animal Planet history. Whether he’s tracking fearsome monsters like the goliathn tiger fish or gargantuan brutes like the freshwater stingray, Wade sifts through the mythology surrounding these creatures to separate fact from fiction. What emerges are true stories to rival even the most exhilarating mysteries.

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    River Monsters

    9.3 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  4. 10.8 hrs • 5/3/2005 • Unabridged

    Travel thirty miles north, south, or east of San Francisco city hall and you’ll be engulfed in a landscape of thick traffic, fast enterprise, and six-dollar cappuccinos. Venture thirty miles due west, however, and you will find yourself on what is virtually another planet: a spooky cluster of rocky islands called the Farallones. Journalist Susan Casey was in her living room when she first glimpsed this strange place and its resident sharks, their dark fins swirling around a tiny boat in a documentary. These great whites were the alphas among alphas, the narrator said, some of them topping eighteen feet in length, and each fall they congregated here off the northern California coast. That so many of these magnificent and elusive animals lived in the 415 area code, crisscrossing each other under the surface like jets stacked in a holding pattern, seemed stunningly improbably—and irresistible. Within a matter of months she was in a seventeen-foot Boston Whaler, being hoisted up a cliff face onto the barren surface of Southeast Farallon Island—part of the group known to nineteenth-century sailors as the “Devil’s Teeth.” There she joined the two biologists who study the sharks, bunking down in the island’s one habitable building, a haunted, 120-year-old house spackled with lichen and gull guano. Less than forty-eight hours later she had her first encounter with the famous, terrifying jaws and was instantly hooked. The Devil’s Teeth offers a rare glimpse into the lives of nature’s most mysterious predators, and of those who follow them. Here is a vivid dispatch from an otherworldly outpost, a story of crossing the boundary between society and an untamed place where humans are neither wanted nor needed.

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    The Devil's Teeth

    10.8 hrs • 5/3/05 • Unabridged
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  5. 5.0 hrs • 1/1/2002 • Unabridged

    Master storyteller Peter Benchley combines high adventure with practical information in Shark Trouble, a book that is at once a thriller and a valuable guide to being safe in, on, under, and around the sea. The bestselling author of Jaws, The Deep, and other works draws on more than three decades of experience to share information about sharks and other marine animals. “Shark attacks on human beings generate a tremendous amount of media coverage,” Benchley writes, “partly because they occur so rarely, but mostly, I think, because people are, and always have been, simultaneously intrigued and terrified by sharks. Sharks come from a wing of the dark castle where our nightmares live—deep water beyond our sight and understanding—and so they stimulate our fears and fantasies and imaginations.” Benchley describes the many types of sharks (including the ones that pose a genuine threat to man), what is and isn’t known about shark behavior, the odds against an attack and how to reduce them even further—all reinforced with the lessons he has learned, the mistakes he has made, and the personal perils he has encountered while producing television documentaries, bestselling novels, and articles about the sea and its inhabitants. He tells how to swim safely in the ocean, how to read the tides and currents, what behavior to avoid, and how to survive when danger suddenly strikes. He discusses how to tell children about sharks and the sea and how to develop, in young and old alike, a healthy respect for the ocean. As Benchley says, “The ocean is the only alien and potentially hostile environment on the planet into which we tend to venture without thinking about the animals that live there, how they behave, how they support themselves, and how they perceive us. I know of no one who would set off into the jungles of Malaysia armed only with a bathing suit, a tube of suntan cream, and a book, and yet that’s precisely how we approach the oceans.” No longer. Not after you’ve read Shark Trouble.

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    Shark Trouble

    5.0 hrs • 1/1/02 • Unabridged
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  6. 5.5 hrs • 4/12/1987 • Unabridged

    “Bluefish,” writes the author, are “animated chopping machines. They will eat anything alive. They have stripped the toes from surfers in Florida. They can’t not eat.” Hersey weaves fact and legend around his subject, engaging the reader with juicy details of ocean life, philosophy, natural history, and the crises into which man has let his environment slide. The pleasures of a summer’s bluefishing off Martha’s Vineyard are marvelously evoked as Hersey reflects upon the angler’s art, wonders of the teeming oceans where fish and fisherman confront each other, and the web of interdependence they share.

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    Blues

    5.5 hrs • 4/12/87 • Unabridged
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