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Civil Rights

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  1. 10.5 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    In Crossing the Thinnest Line, Lauren Leader-Chivee looks at America and describes the possibility for our nation when we embrace our differences. At the heart of America’s current social conflict are fundamental questions about our values as a nation. What does it mean to be American? When will women be fully equal? Should gays and lesbians have equal rights? Does racism still exist? What should we do about immigration? As one of the most diverse nations on earth, how can we live together peacefully and productively? Leader-Chivee passionately argues that we must find a way to make our multifaceted diversity an asset, or else it will continue to be our deepest and most painful source of strife. In Crossing the Thinnest Line, she explains it is possible to bridge our divides and turn our differences into a source of ingenuity, innovation, and prosperity. It is possible to talk about difference so that everyone becomes part of the solution.

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    Crossing the Thinnest Line by Lauren Leader-Chivée
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  2. 6.2 hrs • 9/5/2016 • Unabridged

    Mill’s thinking about freedom in civic and social life examines fundamental principles shared among conservative, liberal, and radical politicians. The life of true philosophy stands outside the political battles that are rampant in society and seeks the political wisdom that is necessary for a good life in any age. Mill’s philosophical presentation and analysis of those principles stand alongside the reflections of Plato, Aristotle, Marcus Aurelius, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. When the officials of any government seek to change the laws that regulate individual liberty or when rhetoricians seek to change public opinion about what individuals should or should not be allowed to say or do, Mill’s On Liberty serves as an effective antidote to the poisons of excessive intrusion into the lives of individuals. The present edition is specifically designed to employ the dual nature of rhetoric - oral and written language - and to utilize electronic technology to open Mill’s text to contemporary listeners.

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    Mill's On Liberty

    6.2 hrs • 9/5/16 • Unabridged
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  3. 8.4 hrs • 6/28/2016 • Unabridged

    From bestselling author and beloved New Yorker writer Calvin Trillin, a deeply resonant collection from fifty years of reporting on race and racism across the country. In this collection, Calvin Trillin returns to the early years of his storied career, when he was a young journalist posted in a fitfully-desegregating Georgia. The people he met there, the country-shaking events he covered, and the changes he saw being made—or blocked—would impact him deeply, and for the next fifty years, Trillin would return to stories about race, racism, and segregation across the entire country. Now, for the first time, the best of Trillin’s pieces on this period and its legacy in the years that followed are collected in one volume.

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    Jackson, 1964

    Read by Robert Fass
    Introduction read by Calvin Trillin
    8.4 hrs • 6/28/16 • Unabridged
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  4. 10.5 hrs • 6/21/2016 • Unabridged

    This revelatory memoir by the mother of Michael Brown, the African American teenager killed by the police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014, sheds light on one of the landmark events in recent history. “I wasn’t there when Mike Mike was shot. I didn’t see him fall or take his last breath, but as his mother, I do know one thing better than anyone, and that’s how to tell my son’s story and the journey we shared together as mother and son,” says Lezley McSpadden When Michael Orlandus Darrion Brown was born, he was adored and doted on by his aunts, uncles, grandparents, his father, and most of all by his sixteen-year-old mother, who nicknamed him Mike Mike. McSpadden never imagined that her son’s name would inspire the resounding chants of protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, and ignite the global conversation about the disparities in the American policing system. In Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil, McSpadden picks up the pieces of the tragedy that shook her life and the country to their core and reveals the unforgettable story of her life, her son, and their truth. Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil is a riveting family memoir about the journey of a young woman triumphing over insurmountable obstacles and learning to become a good mother. With brutal honesty, McSpadden brings us inside her experiences being raised by a hardworking, single mother; her pregnancy at age fifteen and the painful subsequent decision to drop out of school to support her son; how she survived domestic abuse; and her unwavering commitment to raising four strong and healthy children, even if it meant doing so on her own. McSpadden writes passionately about the hours, days, and months after her son was shot to death by Officer Darren Wilson, recounting her time on the ground with peaceful protestors, how she was treated by police and city officials, and how she felt in the gut-wrenching moment when the grand jury announced that it would not indict the man who had killed her son. After the system failed to deliver justice for Michael Brown, McSpadden and thousands of others across America took it upon themselves to carry on his legacy in the fight against injustice and racism. Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil is a portrait of our time, an urgent call to action, and a moving testament to the undying bond between mothers and sons.

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    Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil by Lezley McSpadden

    Tell the Truth & Shame the Devil

    By Lezley McSpadden, with Lyah Beth LeFlore
    10.5 hrs • 6/21/16 • Unabridged
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  5. 8.2 hrs • 6/14/2016 • Unabridged

    The fascinating and very moving story of the lovers, lawyers, judges, and activists behind the groundbreaking Supreme Court case that led to one of the most important national civil rights victories in decades—the legalization of same-sex marriage In June 2015, the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage the law in all fifty states in a decision as groundbreaking as Roe v. Wade and Brown v. Board of Education. Through insider accounts and access to key players, this definitive account reveals the dramatic and previously unreported events behind Obergefell v. Hodges and the lives at its center. This is a story of law and love—and a promise made to a dying man who wanted to know how he would be remembered. Twenty years ago, Jim Obergefell and John Arthur fell in love in Cincinnati, Ohio, a place where gays were routinely picked up by police and fired from their jobs. In 2013, the Supreme Court ruled that the federal government had to provide married gay couples all the benefits offered to straight couples. Jim and John—who was dying from ALS—flew to Maryland, where same-sex marriage was legal. But back home, Ohio refused to recognize their union, or even list Jim’s name on John’s death certificate. Then they met Al Gerhardstein, a courageous attorney who had spent nearly three decades advocating for civil rights and who now saw an opening for the cause that few others had before him. This forceful and deeply affecting narrative—part Erin Brockovich, part Milk, part Still Alice—chronicles how this grieving man and his lawyer, against overwhelming odds, introduced the most important gay rights case in US history. It is an urgent and unforgettable account that will inspire listeners for many years to come.

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    Love Wins by Debbie Cenziper, Jim Obergefell

    Love Wins

    8.2 hrs • 6/14/16 • Unabridged
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  6. 10.6 hrs • 6/7/2016 • Unabridged

    American policing is in crisis. The last decade witnessed a vast increase in police aggression, misconduct, and militarization, along with a corresponding reduction in transparency and accountability. Nowhere is this more noticeable and painful than in African American and other ethnic minority communities. Racism—from raw, individualized versions to insidious systemic examples—appears to be on the rise in our police departments. Overall, our police officers have grown more and more alienated from the people they’ve been hired to serve. In To Protect and Serve, Norm Stamper offers new insights into the conditions that have created this crisis, reminding us that police in a democratic society belong to the people—and not the other way around. To Protect and Serve also delivers a revolutionary new model for American law enforcement: the community-based police department. It calls for citizen participation in all aspects of police operations: policymaking, program development, crime fighting and service delivery, entry-level and ongoing education and training, oversight of police conduct, and, especially relevant to today’s challenges, joint community-police crisis management. Nothing will ever change until the system itself is radically restructured, and here Norm Stamper shows us how.

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    To Protect and Serve

    10.6 hrs • 6/7/16 • Unabridged
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  7. 8.9 hrs • 1/4/2016 • Unabridged

    In February 1971 racial tension surrounding school desegregation in Wilmington, North Carolina, culminated in four days of violence and skirmishes between white vigilantes and black residents. The turmoil resulted in two deaths, six injuries, more than $500,000 in damage, and the firebombing of a white-owned store, before the National Guard restored uneasy peace. Despite glaring irregularities in the subsequent trial, ten young persons were convicted of arson and conspiracy and then sentenced to a total of 282 years in prison. They became known internationally as the Wilmington Ten. A powerful movement arose within North Carolina and beyond to demand their freedom, and after several witnesses admitted to perjury, a federal appeals court, also citing prosecutorial misconduct, overturned the convictions in 1980. Kenneth Janken narrates the dramatic story of the Ten, connecting their story to a larger arc of Black Power and the transformation of post–civil rights–era political organizing. Grounded in extensive interviews, newly declassified government documents, and archival research, this book thoroughly examines the events of 1971 and the subsequent movement for justice that strongly influenced the wider African American freedom struggle.

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    The Wilmington Ten by Kenneth Robert Janken

    The Wilmington Ten

    8.9 hrs • 1/4/16 • Unabridged
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  8. 12.8 hrs • 9/29/2015 • Unabridged

    Not in my backyard—that’s the refrain commonly invoked by property owners who oppose unwanted development. Such words assume a special ferocity when the development in question is public housing. Lisa Belkin penetrates the prejudices, myths, and heated emotions stirred by the most recent trend in public housing as she re-creates a landmark case in riveting detail, showing how a proposal to build scattered-site public housing in middle-class neighborhoods nearly destroyed an entire city and forever changed the lives of many of its citizens. Public housing projects are being torn down throughout the United States. What will take their place? Show Me a Hero explores the answer. An important and compelling work of narrative nonfiction in the tradition of J. Anthony Lukas’s Common Ground. A sweeping yet intimate group portrait that assesses the effects of public policy on individual human lives

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    Show Me a Hero

    Introduction by David Simon
    12.8 hrs • 9/29/15 • Unabridged
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  9. 1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
    7.3 hrs • 8/11/2015 • Unabridged

    First published in 1971, Rules for Radicals is Saul Alinsky's impassioned counsel to young radicals on how to effect constructive social change and know “the difference between being a realistic radical and being a rhetorical one.” Written in the midst of radical political developments whose direction Alinsky was one of the first to question, this volume exhibits his style at its best. Like Thomas Paine before him, Alinsky was able to combine, both in his person and his writing, the intensity of political engagement with an absolute insistence on rational political discourse and adherence to the American democratic tradition.

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    Rules for Radicals

    7.3 hrs • 8/11/15 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
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  10. 13.7 hrs • 6/2/2015 • Unabridged

    It remains without question the most memorable and memorized speech in American history. On November 19, 1863, in 272 words delivered among the freshly dug graves of Union dead upon the country’s bloodiest battlefield, Abraham Lincoln redefined American liberty and forever altered the course of the nation. This volume aims to place the Gettysburg Address in its full context, examining both its influences and impacts, and approaching it from a number of modern perspectives. Never before in one anthology has Lincoln’s immortal address been viewed through such far-reaching lenses as emancipation, women’s rights, immigrant rights, LGBT rights, and more. The scholarship included in this audiobook is new and exciting, with each of its fifteen essays providing further meditation on major themes in the evolution of freedom and equality in America. Edited by filmmaker Sean Conant and with contributions from some of the country’s leading scholars including Sean Wilentz, Craig L. Symonds, and Harold Holzer, this volume explores how in the century and a half since it was delivered, the Gettysburg Address has proven a seemingly inexhaustible source of somber reflection and soaring hope, and why its language continues to resonate with so many people seeking meaning for their own struggles and sacrifices.

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    The Gettysburg Address

    By Sean Contant
    Foreword by Harold Holzer
    Read by a full cast
    13.7 hrs • 6/2/15 • Unabridged
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  11. 7.5 hrs • 5/19/2015 • Unabridged

    From the author of the groundbreaking bestseller Queer in America, a myth-shattering look at the present and future of gay rights. Marriage equality has surged across the country. Closet doors have burst open in business, entertainment, and even major league sports. But as longtime advocate Michelangelo Signorile argues in his most provocative book yet, the excitement of such breathless change makes this moment more dangerous than ever. Puncturing the illusion that victory is now inevitable, Signorile marshals stinging evidence that an age-old hatred, homophobia, is still a basic fact of American life. He exposes the bigotry of the brewing religious conservative backlash against LGBT rights and challenges the complacency and hypocrisy of supposed allies in Washington, the media, and Hollywood. Not just a wake-up call, It’s Not Over is also a battle plan for the fights to come in the march toward equality. Signorile tells the stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans who have refused to be merely tolerated, or worse, and are demanding full acceptance. And he documents signs of hope in schools and communities finding new ways to combat ignorance, bullying, and fear. Urgent and empowering, It’s Not Over is a necessary book from one of our most electrifying voices.

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    It's Not Over

    7.5 hrs • 5/19/15 • Unabridged
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  12. 8.2 hrs • 5/11/2015 • Unabridged

    Lifelong liberal Kirsten Powers blasts the Left’s forced march towards conformity in an exposé of the illiberal war on free speech. No longer champions of tolerance and free speech, the “illiberal Left” now viciously attacks and silences anyone with alternative points of view. Powers asks, “Whatever happened to free speech in America?”

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    The Silencing

    8.2 hrs • 5/11/15 • Unabridged
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  13. 7.4 hrs • 3/1/2015 • Unabridged

    They Know Everything about You is a groundbreaking exposé of how government agencies and tech corporations monitor virtually every aspect of our lives and a fierce defense of privacy and democracy. The revelation that the government has access to a vast trove of personal online data demonstrates that we already live in a surveillance society. But the erosion of privacy rights extends far beyond big government. Intelligence agencies such as the NSA and CIA are using Silicon Valley corporate partners as their data spies. Seemingly progressive tech companies are joining forces with snooping government agencies to create a brave new world of wired tyranny. Life in the digital age poses an unprecedented challenge to our constitutional liberties, which guarantee a wall of privacy between the individual and the government. The basic assumption of democracy requires the ability of the individual to experiment with ideas and associations within a protected zone, as secured by the Constitution. The unobserved moment embodies the most basic of human rights, yet it is being squandered in the name of national security and consumer convenience. Robert Scheer argues that the information revolution, while a source of public enlightenment, contains the seeds of freedom’s destruction in the form of a surveillance state that exceeds the wildest dream of the most ingenious dictator. The technology of surveillance, unless vigorously resisted, represents an existential threat to the liberation of the human spirit.

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    They Know Everything about You

    7.4 hrs • 3/1/15 • Unabridged
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  14. 5.0 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    At last, a new audio edition of the book many have called James Baldwin’s most influential work! Written during the 1940s and early 1950s, when Baldwin was only in his twenties, the essays collected in Notes of a Native Son capture a view of black life and black thought at the dawn of the civil rights movement and as the movement slowly gained strength through the words of one of the most captivating essayists and foremost intellectuals of that era. Writing as an artist, activist, and social critic, Baldwin probes the complex condition of being black in America. With a keen eye, he examines everything from the significance of the protest novel to the motives and circumstances of the many black expatriates of the time, from his home in “The Harlem Ghetto” to a sobering “Journey to Atlanta.” Notes of a Native Son inaugurated Baldwin as one of the leading interpreters of the dramatic social changes erupting in the United States in the twentieth century, and many of his observations have proven almost prophetic. His criticism on topics such as the paternalism of white progressives or on his own friend Richard Wright’s work is pointed and unabashed. He was also one of the few writing on race at the time who addressed the issue with a powerful mixture of outrage at the gross physical and political violence against black citizens and measured understanding of their oppressors, which helped awaken a white audience to the injustices under their noses. Naturally, this combination of brazen criticism and unconventional empathy for white readers won Baldwin as much condemnation as praise. Notes is the book that established Baldwin’s voice as a social critic, and it remains one of his most admired works. The essays collected here create a cohesive sketch of black America and reveal an intimate portrait of Baldwin’s own search for identity as an artist, as a black man, and as an American.

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    Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin

    Notes of a Native Son

    5.0 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
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  15. 18.1 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    At first, it seemed like a small story. The royal editor of the News of the World was caught listening to the voice mail messages of staff at Buckingham Palace. He and a private investigator were jailed, and the case was closed. But Nick Davies, special correspondent for the Guardian, knew it didn’t add up. He began to investigate and ended up exposing a world of crime and cover-up, of fear and favor—the long shadow of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire. Hack Attack is the mesmerizing story of how Davies and a small group of lawyers and politicians took on one of the most powerful men in the world and emerged victorious. It exposes the inner workings of the ruthless machine that was the News of the World and of the private investigators who hacked phones, listened to live calls, sent Trojan horse emails, bribed the police, and committed burglaries to dig up tabloid scoops. Above all, it is a study of the private lives of the power elite. It paints an intimate portrait of the social network that gave Murdoch privileged access to government and allowed him and his lieutenants to intimidate anyone who stood up to them. Spanning the course of the investigation from Davies’ contact with his first source in early 2008 to the resolution of the criminal trial in June 2014, this is the definitive record of one of the major scandals of our time, written by the journalist who was there every step of the way.

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    Hack Attack by Nick Davies

    Hack Attack

    18.1 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
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  16. 14.5 hrs • 1/20/2015 • Unabridged

    An unprecedented international publishing event: the first and only diary written by a still-imprisoned Guantánamo detainee Since 2002 Mohamedou Slahi has been imprisoned at the detainee camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In all these years, the United States has never charged him with a crime. Although his release was ordered by a federal judge, the US government fought that decision, and there is no sign that the United States plans to let him go. Three years into his captivity, Slahi began a diary, recounting his life before he disappeared into US custody and daily life as a detainee. His diary is not merely a vivid record of a miscarriage of justice, but a deeply personal memoir—terrifying, darkly humorous, and surprisingly gracious. Published now for the first time, Guantánamo Diary is a document of immense historical importance.

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    Guantánamo Diary

    Edited by Larry Siems
    Read by Peter Ganim
    14.5 hrs • 1/20/15 • Unabridged
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