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  1. 9.3 hrs • 2/21/2017

    Featured speeches from past political conventions include candidates, presidents, senators, and members of Congress, mayors, governors, Hollywood celebrities, and more. This product includes such famous addresses as JFK’s acceptance speech, Ronald Reagan and Ted Kennedy’s concession speeches, Mario Cuomo’s “Tale of Two Cities”, and Clint Eastwood’s “Empty Chair,” among others. Produced by the Speech Resource Company and fully narrated by Robert Wikstrom.

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    Historic Moments in Speech: Political Conventions by the Speech Resource Company
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  2. 17.6 hrs • 1/31/2017 • Unabridged

    A manifesto for deep and radical change, Creating Freedom explores the limits placed on freedom by human nature and society. It explodes myths, calling for a profound transformation in the way we think about democracy, equality, and our own identities. Free markets, free elections, free media, free thought, free speech, free will—the language of freedom pervades our lives, framing the most urgent issues of our time and the deepest questions about who we are and who we want to be. It is a foundational concept at the heart of our civilization, but it has long been distorted to justify its opposite: soaring inequality, the erosion of democracy, an irrational criminal justice system, and a dehumanizing foreign policy. Raoul Martinez argues that the more we understand the limits on our freedom, the better placed we are to transcend them. Drawing together findings and ideas from neuroscience, criminology, psychology, politics, climate science, economics, and philosophy, Creating Freedom constructs a radical framework to make sense of the world and empower us to change it. This is a wide-ranging analysis of power, control, and freedom, which asks us to question our inherited identities, question our society, and turn the power to choose into the freedom to create.

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    Creating Freedom by Raoul Martinez

    Creating Freedom

    17.6 hrs • 1/31/17 • Unabridged
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  3. 10.8 hrs • 1/9/2017 • Unabridged

    Back by popular demand, the bestselling Politically Incorrect Guides provide an unvarnished, unapologetic overview of the topics every American needs to know. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1 profiles America’s early presidents, from George Washington to William Howard Taft.

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    The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1 by Larry Schweikart
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  4. 9.2 hrs • 12/27/2016 • Unabridged

    “Speak softly and carry a big stick” Theodore Roosevelt famously said in 1901, when the United States was emerging as a great power. It was the right sentiment, perhaps, in an age of imperial rivalry. But today many Americans doubt the utility of their global military presence, thinking it outdated, unnecessary, or even dangerous. In The Big Stick, Eliot A. Cohen—a scholar and practitioner of international relations—disagrees. He argues that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy. While acknowledging that the United States must be careful about why, when, and how it uses force, he insists that its international role is as critical as ever, and armed force is vital to that role. Cohen explains that American leaders must learn to use hard power in new ways and for new circumstances. The rise of a well-armed China, Russia’s conquest of Crimea and eastern Ukraine, nuclear threats from North Korea and Iran, and the spread of radical Islamist movements like ISIS are some of the key threats to global peace. If the United States relinquishes its position as a strong but prudent military power and fails to accept its role as the guardian of a stable world order, we run the risk of unleashing disorder, violence, and tyranny on a scale not seen since the 1930s. The United States is still, as Madeleine Albright once dubbed it, “the indispensable nation.”

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    The Big Stick by Eliot A. Cohen

    The Big Stick

    9.2 hrs • 12/27/16 • Unabridged
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  5. 10.2 hrs • 11/30/2016 • Unabridged

    On March 29, 1516, the city council of Venice issued a decree forcing Jews to live in il geto―a closed quarter named for the copper foundry that once occupied the area. The term stuck. In this sweeping and original interpretation, Mitchell Duneier traces the idea of the ghetto from its beginnings in the sixteenth century and its revival by the Nazis to the present. As Duneier shows, we cannot understand the entanglements of race, poverty, and place in America today without recalling the history of the ghetto in Europe, as well as later efforts to understand the problems of the American city. This is the story of the scholars and activists who tried to achieve that understanding. Their efforts to wrestle with race and poverty in their times cannot be divorced from their individual biographies, which often included direct encounters with prejudice and discrimination in the academy and elsewhere. Using new and forgotten sources, Duneier introduces us to Horace Cayton and St. Clair Drake, graduate students whose conception of the South Side of Chicago established a new paradigm for thinking about Northern racism and poverty in the 1940s. We learn how the psychologist Kenneth Clark subsequently linked Harlem’s slum conditions with the persistence of black powerlessness in the civil-rights era, and we follow the controversy over Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s report on the black family. We see how the sociologist William Julius Wilson redefined the debate about urban America as middle-class African Americans increasingly escaped the ghetto and the country retreated from racially specific remedies. And we trace the education reformer Geoffrey Canada’s efforts to transform the lives of inner-city children with ambitious interventions, even as other reformers sought to help families escape their neighborhoods altogether. Ghetto offers a clear-eyed assessment of the thinkers and doers who have shaped American ideas about urban poverty and the ghetto. The result is a valuable new understanding of an age-old concept.

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    Ghetto by Mitchell Duneier

    Ghetto

    10.2 hrs • 11/30/16 • Unabridged
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  6. 1.8 hrs • 10/11/2016 • Unabridged

    Meals are perhaps the most important aspect of prison life. They keep inmates alive, both physically and emotionally, as mess halls and common areas provide a level of social interaction in an otherwise lonely situation. Albert “Prodigy” Johnson served three-and-a-half years in prison, and during that time his focus was on his health—an almost impossible feat behind bars, where many inmates often enter the prison system healthy but leave with diabetes and hypertension. Commissary Kitchen provides a deeper perspective of what it’s like to consume meals in prison. While recipes are provided, Prodigy and cowriter Kathy Iandoli also tell various anecdotes about situations in prison involving food. Meal prep in prison is very limited, so while this work appeals to anyone who has served time or is curious about prison life, it also speaks to those who prepare food with limited access to various cooking luxuries (such as college students in dorms). While the work is informational, above all it humanizes the prison experience in a way that has never been done before.

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    Commissary Kitchen by Albert “Prodigy” Johnson, Kathy Iandoli

    Commissary Kitchen

    1.8 hrs • 10/11/16 • Unabridged
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  7. 10.5 hrs • 10/4/2016 • Unabridged

    On an average day in America, seven young people aged nineteen or under will be shot dead. In Another Day in the Death of America, award-winning Guardian journalist Gary Younge tells the stories of the lives lost during the course of a single day in the United States. It could have been any day, but Younge has chosen November 23, 2013. From Jaiden Dixon (9), shot point-blank by his mother’s ex-boyfriend on his doorstep in Ohio, to Pedro Dado Cortez (16), shot by an enemy gang on a street corner in California, the narrative crisscrosses the country over a period of twenty-four hours to reveal the powerful human stories behind the statistics. Far from a dry account of gun policy in the United States or a polemic about the dangers of gun violence, the book is a gripping chronicle of an ordinary but deadly day in American life, and a series of character portraits of young people taken from us far too soon and those they left behind. Whether it’s a father’s unspeakable grief over his son who was at the wrong place at the wrong time, a mentor who tries to channel his rage by organizing, or a friend and neighbor who finds strength in faith, the lives lost on that day and the lives left behind become, in Younge’s hands, impossible to ignore, or to forget. What emerges in these pages is a searing portrait of youth, family, and the way that lives can be shattered in an instant on any day in America. At a time when it has become indisputable that Americans need to rethink their position on guns, this moving narrative work puts a human face—a child’s face—on the “collateral damage” of gun deaths across the country. In his journalism, Younge is committed to challenging conventional wisdom and looking twice where others might look away. There are some things, he argues, that we have come to see as normal, even when they are unacceptable. And gun violence is one of them. A clear-eyed and iconoclastic approach to this contentious issue, this book helps answer the questions so many of us are grappling with, and makes it even harder to just look away.

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    Another Day in the Death of America by Gary Younge

    Another Day in the Death of America

    10.5 hrs • 10/4/16 • Unabridged
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  8. 4.2 hrs • 10/4/2016 • Unabridged

    An inspired and original compilation for the 2016 election year, God Is in the House is a collection of essays by members of Congress who reflect on their deep faith and how it guides them as legislators. Compiled by Representative Virginia Foxx, who personally asked for contributions from congressional colleagues and coworkers, God Is in the House features essays from eighteen members of Congress from both political parties, representing eleven faiths and denominations.

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    God Is in the House by Virginia Foxx

    God Is in the House

    Foreword by Paul Ryan
    4.2 hrs • 10/4/16 • Unabridged
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  9. 12.5 hrs • 10/4/2016 • Unabridged

    A unique and compelling portrait of William F. Buckley as the champion of conservative ideas in an age of liberal dominance When Firing Line premiered on American television in 1966, just two years after Barry Goldwater’s devastating defeat, liberalism was ascendant. Though the Left seemed to have decisively won the hearts and minds of the electorate, the show’s creator and host, William F. Buckley—relishing his role as a public contrarian—made the case for conservative ideas, believing that his side would ultimately win because its arguments were better. As the founder of the Right’s flagship journal, National Review, Buckley spoke to like-minded readers. With Firing Line, he reached beyond conservative enclaves, engaging millions of Americans across the political spectrum. Each week on Firing Line, Buckley and his guests—the cream of America’s intellectual class, such as Tom Wolfe, Noam Chomsky, Norman Mailer, Henry Kissinger, and Milton Friedman—debated the urgent issues of the day, bringing politics, culture, and economics into American living rooms as never before. Buckley himself was an exemplary host; he never appealed to emotion and prejudice; he engaged his guests with a unique and entertaining combination of principle, wit, fact, a truly fearsome vocabulary, and genuine affection for his adversaries. Drawing on archival material, interviews, and transcripts, Open to Debate provides a richly detailed portrait of this widely respected ideological warrior, showing him in action as never before. Much more than just the story of a television show, Hendershot’s book provides a history of American public intellectual life from the 1960s through the 1980s—one of the most contentious eras in our history—and shows how Buckley led the way in drawing America to conservatism during those years.

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    Open to Debate by Heather Hendershot

    Open to Debate

    12.5 hrs • 10/4/16 • Unabridged
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  10. 9.6 hrs • 9/20/2016 • Unabridged

    The United States has two separate banking systems today―one serving the well-to-do and another exploiting everyone else. How the Other Half Banks contributes to the growing conversation on American inequality by highlighting one of its prime causes: unequal credit. Mehrsa Baradaran examines how a significant portion of the population, deserted by banks, is forced to wander through a Wild West of payday lenders and check-cashing services to cover emergency expenses and pay for necessities―all thanks to deregulation that began in the 1970s and continues decades later. In an age of corporate megabanks with trillions of dollars in assets, it is easy to forget that America’s banking system was originally created as a public service. Banks have always relied on credit from the federal government, provided on favorable terms so that they could issue low-interest loans. But as banks grew in size and political influence, they shed their social contract with the American people, demanding to be treated as a private industry free from any public-serving responsibility. They abandoned less profitable, low-income customers in favor of wealthier clients and high-yield investments. Fringe lenders stepped in to fill the void. This two-tier banking system has become even more unequal since the 2008 financial crisis. Baradaran proposes a solution: reenlisting the US Post Office in its historic function of providing bank services. The post office played an important but largely forgotten role in the creation of American democracy, and it could be deployed again to level the field of financial opportunity.

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    How the Other Half Banks by Mehrsa Baradaran

    How the Other Half Banks

    9.6 hrs • 9/20/16 • Unabridged
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  11. 5.8 hrs • 9/13/2016 • Unabridged

    The culmination of nearly thirty years of reporting on Donald Trump, Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter David Cay Johnston takes a revealingly close look at the mogul’s rise to power and prominence. Covering the long arc of Trump’s career, Johnston tells the full story of how a boy from a quiet section of Queens, New York, would become an entirely new and complex breed of public figure. Trump is a man of great media savvy, entrepreneurial spirit, and political clout. Yet his career has been plagued by legal troubles and mounting controversy. From the origins of his family’s real estate fortune to his own too-big-to-fail business empire; from his education and early career to his whirlwind presidential bid, The Making of Donald Trump provides the fullest picture yet of Trump’s extraordinary ascendency. Love him or hate him, Trump’s massive influence is undeniable, and figures as diverse as Woody Guthrie (who wrote a scathing song about Trump’s father) and Red Scare prosecutor Roy Cohn, mob bosses and high rollers, as well as the average American voter, have all been pulled into his orbit. Drawing on decades of interviews, financial records, court documents, and public statements, David Cay Johnston, who has covered Trump more closely than any other journalist working today, gives us the most in-depth look yet at the man who would be president.

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    The Making of Donald Trump by David Cay Johnston

    The Making of Donald Trump

    5.8 hrs • 9/13/16 • Unabridged
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  12. 18.6 hrs • 9/13/2016 • Unabridged

    A veteran political journalist takes listeners inside the fascinating post-presidential exploits of Bill Clinton, which are as colorful, controversial, and significant as ever. The extraordinary post-presidency of William Jefferson Clinton is unlike the second career of any other president. “Bill Clinton” is a global brand, ascending from the dark days of his White House departure to become perhaps the most popular name in the world. Joe Conason explains how that happened, examining Clinton’s achievements, his failures, and his motivations and why his outlook on the world continues to inspire and infuriate on a grand scale. Having known Clinton for over twenty years, Conason interviewed him many times for this book and gained access to dozens of the former president’s colleagues, friends, aides, supporters, and family members, including Hillary and Chelsea. He has traveled with Clinton to Africa, Haiti, Israel, and across America for the Clinton Foundation. Clinton has earned millions himself and raised billions for philanthropy, much of it from foreign sources, prompting questions about transparency and probity—even allegations of corruption—as Hillary entered the Democratic presidential primary. Conason examines the substance of those accusations and the financial backing from other countries and wealthy individuals and assesses the real achievements of the foundation. As ever, Clinton’s private life draws conjecture, and he is often in the gossip columns along with fellow celebrities and statesmen. He is friendly with both of the former presidents Bush. He golfs with President Obama. But how might the first First Gentleman fare in a Hillary Clinton White House? Conason knows the Clinton world as well as any reporter writing today. He is the coauthor of The Hunting of the President, a New York Times bestseller. Now he tells an irresistible adventure story about a man who is still seeking to do good in the world—starring the one and only Bill Clinton.

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    Man of the World by Joe Conason

    Man of the World

    18.6 hrs • 9/13/16 • Unabridged
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  13. 7.9 hrs • 9/1/2016 • Unabridged

    Americans have come to expect that the nation’s presidential campaigns will be characterized by a carnival atmosphere emphasizing style over substance. But this fascinating account of the pivotal 1840 election reveals how the now-unavoidable traditions of big money, big rallies, shameless self-promotion, and carefully manufactured candidate images first took root in presidential politics. Pulitzer Prize–nominated former Wall Street Journal reporter Ronald G. Shafer tells the colorful story of the election battle between sitting president Martin Van Buren, a professional Democratic politician from New York, and Whig Party upstart William Henry Harrison, a military hero who was nicknamed “Old Tippecanoe” after a battlefield where he fought and won in 1811. Shafer shows how the pivotal campaign of “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too” marked a series of firsts that changed presidential politicking forever: the first presidential campaign as mass entertainment, directed at middle-income and lower-income voters; the first “image campaign,” in which strategists painted Harrison as an everyman living in a log cabin sipping hard cider (in fact, he was born into wealth, lived in a twenty-two-room mansion, and drank only sweet cider); the first campaign in which a candidate, Harrison, traveled and delivered speeches directly to voters; the first one influenced by major campaign donations; the first in which women openly participated; and the first involving massive grassroots rallies, attended by tens of thousands and marked by elaborate fanfare, including bands, floats, a log cabin on wheels, and the world’s tallest man. Some of history’s most fascinating figures—including Susan B. Anthony, Charles Dickens, Abraham Lincoln, Edgar Allan Poe, Thaddeus Stevens, and Walt Whitman—pass through this colorful story, which is essential reading for anyone interested in learning when image first came to trump ideas in presidential politics.

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    The Carnival Campaign by Ronald G. Shafer

    The Carnival Campaign

    7.9 hrs • 9/1/16 • Unabridged
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  14. 7.6 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    Hyperpartisanship has gridlocked the American government. Congress’ approval ratings are at record lows, and both Democrats and Republicans are disgusted by the government’s inability to get anything done. In It’s Even Worse Than It Looks, Congressional scholars Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein present a grim picture of how party polarization and tribal politics have led Congress—and the United States—to the brink of institutional failure. In this revised edition, the authors bring their seminal book up to date in a political environment that is more divided than ever. The underlying dynamics of the situation—extremist Republicans holding government hostage to their own ideological, antigovernment beliefs—have only gotten worse, further bolstering their argument that Republicans are not merely ideologically different from Democrats, but engaged in a unique form of politics that undermines the system itself. Without a fundamental change in the character and course of the Republican Party, we may have a long way to go before we hit rock bottom.

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    It’s Even Worse Than It Looks by Thomas E. Mann, Norman J. Ornstein
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  15. 5.1 hrs • 8/2/2016 • Unabridged

    A deeply reported look inside the new conservative movement working to undermine American democracy. Control of the country is up for grabs—and Republicans have been rigging the game in their favor. Twenty-two states have passed restrictions on voting. Ruthless gerrymandering has given the GOP a long-term grip on Congress. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court has eviscerated campaign finance laws, boosting candidgates backed by big money. It would be worrying enough if these were just schemes for partisan advantage. But the reality is even more disturbing. As reporter Zachary Roth reveals, a growing number of Republicans distrust the very idea of democracy—and they’re doing everything they can to limit it. In The Great Suppression, Roth unearths the deep historical roots of this antiegalitarian worldview, and introduces us to its modern-day proponents: the GOP officials pushing to make it harder to cast a ballot; the lawyers looking to scrap all limits on money in politics; the libertarian scholars reclaiming judicial activism to roll back the New Deal; and the corporate lobbyists working to ban local action on everything from the minimum wage to the environment. And he travels from Rust Belt cities to southern towns to show us how these efforts are hurting the most vulnerable Americans and preventing progress on pressing issues. A sharp, searing polemic in the tradition of Rachel Maddow and Matt Taibbi, The Great Suppression is an urgent wake-up call about a threat to our most cherished values, and a rousing argument for why we need democracy now more than ever.

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    The Great Suppression by Zachary Roth

    The Great Suppression

    5.1 hrs • 8/2/16 • Unabridged
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  16. 5.1 hrs • 8/1/2016 • Unabridged

    Gun-rights advocate John Lott, author of More Guns, Less Crime, rebuts recent antigun “factoids” with real statistics. When it comes to the gun control debate, there are two kinds of data: data that’s accurate, and data that left-wing billionaires, politicians, and media want you to believe is accurate. In The War on Guns, economist and gun-rights advocate John Lott turns a skeptical eye to well-funded antigun studies and stories that perpetuate false statistics to frighten Americans into giving up their guns.

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    The War on Guns by John R. Lott Jr.

    The War on Guns

    5.1 hrs • 8/1/16 • Unabridged
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