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  1. 10.2 hrs • 6/7/2016 • Unabridged

    A thoughtful, gleeful encyclopedia of emotions, both broad and outrageously specific, from throughout history and around the world. Have you ever tried to describe a feeling and failed? Don’t despair any longer! Whether you want to feel smug and impress your friends or just want to communicate how hygge (the Danish word for cozy) you feel at home on a winter night, The Book of Human Emotions is for you. In this unique audiobook, you’ll learn the stories behind the names for some of our most anguished emotions, both familiar (love, rage) and unfamiliar (litost, greng-jai). For instance, did you know that Kierkegaard was the first person to identify anxiety as its own emotion? Or that apathy comes from the Greek roots a (without) and pathos (passion)? Besides, aren’t you curious what Nginyiwarrarringu means?

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    The Book of Human Emotions

    10.2 hrs • 6/7/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 7.0 hrs • 4/1/2014 • Unabridged

    Do you know … why a mortgage is literally a death pledge? why guns have girls’ names? why salt is related to soldier? You’re about to find out. The Etymologicon e-tə-‘mä-lä-ji-kän is: Witty wi-tē: Full of clever humor Erudite er-ə-ˌdīt: Showing knowledge Ribald ri-bəld: Crude, offensive The Etymologicon is a completely unauthorized guide to the strange underpinnings of the English language. It explains how you get from “gruntled” to “disgruntled”; why you are absolutely right to believe that your meager salary barely covers “money for salt”; how the biggest chain of coffee shops in the world (hint: Seattle) connects to whaling in Nantucket; and what precisely the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    The Etymologicon

    7.0 hrs • 4/1/14 • Unabridged
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    Also: CD
  3. 6.5 hrs • 4/1/2014 • Unabridged

    Do you wake up feeling rough? Then you’re philogrobolized. Find yourself pretending to work? That’s fudgelling. And this could lead to rizzling, if you feel sleepy after lunch. Though you are sure to become a sparkling deipnosopbist by dinner. Just don’t get too vinomadefied; a drunk dinner companion is never appreciated. The Horologicon (or book of hours) contains the most extraordinary words in the English language, arranged according to what hour of the day you might need them. From Mark Forsyth, the author of the international bestseller The Etymologicon, comes a book of weird words for familiar situations. From ante-jentacular to snudge by way of quafftide and wamblecropt, at last you can say, with utter accuracy, exactly what you mean.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    The Horologicon

    6.5 hrs • 4/1/14 • Unabridged
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    Also: CD
  4. 5.3 hrs • 11/1/2013 • Unabridged

    America’s most influential writing teacher offers an engaging and practical guide to effective short-form writing. In How to Write Short, Roy Peter Clark turns his attention to the art of painting a thousand pictures with just a few words. Short forms of writing have always existed-from ship logs and telegrams to prayers and haikus. But in this ever-changing Internet age, short-form writing has become an essential skill. Clark covers how to write effective and powerful titles, headlines, essays, sales pitches, Tweets, letters, and even self-descriptions for online dating services. With examples from the long tradition of short-form writing in Western culture, How to Write Short guides writers to crafting brilliant prose, even in 140 characters.

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    How to Write Short

    5.3 hrs • 11/1/13 • Unabridged
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  5. 6.5 hrs • 6/7/2011 • Unabridged

    A veritable ‘TKO of terminology,’ Better Than Great is the essential guide for describing the extraordinary—the must-have reference for anyone wishing to rise above tired superlatives. Deft praise encourages others to feel as we do, share our enthusiasms. It rewards deserving objects of admiration. It persuades people to take certain actions. It sells things. Sadly, in this ‘age of awesome,’ our words and phrases of acclaim are exhausted, all but impotent. Even so, we find ourselves defaulting to such habitual choices as ‘good,’ ‘great,’ and ‘terrific,’ or stock synonyms that tumble out of a thesaurus—‘superb,’ ‘marvelous,’ ‘outstanding,’ and the like. The piling on of intensifiers such as ‘totally’ only makes matters worse, while negative modifiers (‘incredible,’ ‘unreal’) render our common parlance nearly tragic. Until now. Not to mince words, wunderkind of word-wonks Arthur Plotnik is proffering a well-knit wellspring of worthy and wondrous words to rescue our worn-down usage. Plotnik is both hella and hecka up to the task of rescuing the English superlative, offering readers the chance never to be at a loss for words of praise and acclamation!

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental

    Better Than Great

    6.5 hrs • 6/7/11 • Unabridged
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    Also: Digital Rental
  6. 0.6 hrs • 5/20/2011 • Unabridged

    This title is laser-focused on making you sound smarter and becoming more respected by using a larger, more sophisticated vocabulary. Simply has systematically excluded words here that did meet this goal—words that are perfectly good in some contexts, but will not make you sound smarter. These include slang and popular-culture words, such as angst, avant-garde, Catch 22, kitsch, red herring, and white elephant. Then eliminated were those words whose meanings are often misconstrued, such as disinterested and complement/compliment. And finally, we eliminated were words that sound awkward in speech, such as accolade, baroque, epiphany, philistine, tete-a-tete, tryst, unrequited, and waft. Included words sound appropriate in conversation, work seamlessly, and will not be interpreted as “show off” words. The final test was that the words had to be those that people nodded slightly at when heard, because they enhance meaning and do not elicit any slight grimaces. We worked hard to eliminate those grimace words!

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental
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    Also: Digital Rental
  7. 1.0 hrs • 1/6/2009 • Unabridged

    Now from Peter Funk, the Reader's Digest word columnist and the bestselling author of Word Power, comes Upsize Your Word Power, teaching you the fastest and easiest way to expand your vocabulary: the use of synonyms.Synonyms are a sound and often overlooked way to build vocabulary. With synonyms, you can express almost any shade of feeling or describe almost anything in minute detail. In Upsize Your Word Power, Peter and Mary Funk will examine the use of synonyms and help you to:-broaden your vocabulary-better your use of the English language-learn to use precise and attention-getting meaning-related words-practice using target words in commonly experienced situationsThrough the powerful and underutilized vocabulary tool of synonyms, you too can Upsize Your Word Power.

    Available Formats: Download

    Upsize Your Word Power

    1.0 hrs • 1/6/09 • Unabridged
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  8. 2.6 hrs • 1/1/2004 • Unabridged

    SAT Words To Go on CD allows busy students to study anytime, anywhere! Guaranteed to make learning SAT vocabulary words quick, easy, and fun, SAT Words To Go is conveniently designed to allow you to master words found on the New SAT while you're on the run. • Strengthen your vocabulary by learning and using word families • Explore word roots -- the key to deciphering unfamiliar words • Maximize your SAT performance with practice sessions Kaplan, the world leader in test prep, provides a full range of services, including test prep courses, admissions counseling, programs for international students, and more. For more information, call 1-800-KAP-TEST or visit kaptest.com.

    Available Formats: Download

    SAT Words to Go

    Read by Kaplan
    2.6 hrs • 1/1/05 • Unabridged
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