29 Results for:

Genetics & Genomics

  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 16 of 29
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  1. 11.0 hrs • 9/6/2016 • Unabridged

    The DNA Restart by world-renowned neurogeneticist and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Sharon Moalem walks you through revolutionary steps to a diet and lifestyle perfect for your individual genetic makeup. The DNA Restart plan utilizes decades of in-depth scientific research into genetics, epigenetics, nutrition, and longevity to explain the pivotal role genes play in the journey to ideal weight and health status. Dr. Moalem’s unique twenty-eight-day plan shows you how to upgrade sleep, sensory awareness, and exercise; conduct easy genetic self-tests that allow you to individualize your carbohydrate intake levels, determine your genetically optimized level of alcohol intake, and more; and genetically thrive by incorporating umami-rich recipes and oolong into your diet. Inspiring testimonials and delicious recipes with mix-and-match meal plans round out this groundbreaking diet book.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
    The DNA Restart by Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD

    The DNA Restart

    Foreword by Chef Nobu Matsuhisa
    Read by P. J. Ochlan
    11.0 hrs • 9/6/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD, Digital Rental
  2. 12.2 hrs • 11/10/2015 • Unabridged
    Available Formats: Download

    Super Genes

    12.2 hrs • 11/10/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  3. 10.8 hrs • 3/10/2015 • Unabridged

    A sweeping, paradigm-shifting account of how evolution is no longer driven just by nature but also by human choices Why are conditions like autism, asthma, obesity, and allergies exploding at unprecedented rates? Why are we living longer, getting smarter, having far fewer kids? If Darwin was alive today, how would he explain this new world? Today’s humans have developed such profound capabilities for redesigning bacteria, plants, animals, and ourselves that random mutation and natural selection are no longer the primary determinants of which species survive and how they change over time. Evolution is now increasingly driven by two forces: Unnatural Selection (what lives and dies has to do with human desires and choices, not the natural ability to reproduce and thrive) and Nonrandom Mutation (our techniques have gotten so precise that we can drastically alter the genetics of any life form). Evolving Ourselves is a chronicle of how life is evolving to meet our specs and choices, of how we can change our own biology, and of the unintended consequences for future generations. It proves that how we use our enormous power over life forms and our ability to engineer new environments will determine nothing less than the survival of humanity.

    Available Formats: Download

    Evolving Ourselves

    10.8 hrs • 3/10/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  4. 8.7 hrs • 10/30/2014 • Unabridged

    The world of high-performance athletics is changing forever. Not so long ago, you could compete at the top level with hard work and a good coach, but today, it’s impossible to separate the achievements of athletes from the scientists who support them. In Faster, Higher, Stronger, veteran journalist Mark McClusky brings readers behind the scenes with a new generation of athletes, coaches, and scientists whose accomplishments are changing our understanding of human physical achievement and completely redefining the limits of the human body. At the exciting new frontier of sports, science, and technology, the book exploresthe role that genes and training play;how to find hidden champions and fast-track greatness;the truth about the ten-thousand–hours rule;new research on breaking through fatigue;revolutions in data and nutrition; andhow we can apply the lessons about focus, dedication, and sheer ingenuity in our own lives. Brimming with cutting-edge science and gripping anecdotes, Faster, Higher, Stronger is a fascinating, exhilarating look at how far we can push the boundaries of our bodies and minds.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Faster, Higher, Stronger by Mark McClusky

    Faster, Higher, Stronger

    8.7 hrs • 10/30/14 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  5. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    8.5 hrs • 10/2/2014 • Unabridged

    A renowned biologist answers one of the most important questions in the life sciences Darwinian theory explains what happens when innovations arise among living things, but it doesn’t tell us how those innovations came about in the first place. As genetics pioneer Hugo de Vries put it, “Natural selection may explain the survival of the fittest, but it cannot explain the arrival of the fittest.” Andreas Wagner, an award-winning evolutionary biologist, has found that life can innovate itself far faster than scientists previously thought possible. His research shows how adaptations are not just driven by chance but rather by a set of laws that allow nature to discover new molecules and mechanisms in a fraction of the time that random variation would take. Filled with examples of the remarkable biological creativity that surrounds us, Arrival of the Fittest breaks new ground in explaining how innovations in nature occur.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    Arrival of the Fittest by Andreas Wagner

    Arrival of the Fittest

    8.5 hrs • 10/2/14 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  6. 10.8 hrs • 5/6/2014 • Unabridged

    Drawing on startling new evidence from the human genome, A Troublesome Inheritance is an exploration of how and why the human population differentiated into distinctive races beginning fifty thousand years ago. Fewer ideas have been more toxic or harmful than the idea of the biological reality of race, and with it the idea that humans of different races are biologically different from one another. For this understandable reason, the idea has been banished from polite academic conversation. Arguing that race is more than just a social construct can get a scholar run out of town, or at least off campus. Human evolution, the consensus view insists, ended in prehistory. Inconveniently, as Nicholas Wade argues in A Troublesome Inheritance, the consensus view cannot be right. And in fact, we know that populations have changed in the past few thousand years—to be lactose tolerant, for example, and to survive at high altitudes. Race is not a bright-line distinction; by definition it means that the more human populations are kept apart, the more they evolve their own distinct traits under the selective pressure known as Darwinian evolution. For many thousands of years, most human populations stayed where they were and grew distinct, not just in outward appearance but in deeper senses as well. Wade, the longtime journalist covering genetic advances for the New York Times, draws widely on the work of scientists who have made crucial breakthroughs in establishing the reality of recent human evolution. The most provocative claims in this book involve the genetic basis of human social habits. What we might call middle-class social traits—thrift, docility, nonviolence—have been slowly but surely inculcated genetically within agrarian societies, Wade argues. These “values” obviously had a strong cultural component, but Wade points to evidence that agrarian societies evolved away from hunter-gatherer societies in some crucial respects. Also controversial are his findings regarding the genetic basis of traits we associate with intelligence, such as literacy and numeracy, in certain ethnic populations, including the Chinese and Ashkenazi Jews. Wade believes deeply in the fundamental equality of all human peoples. He also believes that science is best served by pursuing the truth without fear, and if his mission to arrive at a coherent summa of what the new genetic science does and does not tell us about race and human history leads straight into a minefield, then so be it. This will not be the last word on the subject, but it will begin a powerful and overdue conversation.

    Available Formats: Download

    A Troublesome Inheritance

    10.8 hrs • 5/6/14 • Unabridged
    Download
  7. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    6.7 hrs • 4/15/2014 • Unabridged

    Combine the counterintuitive nature of Freakonomics with the fascinating medical tales of Oliver Sacks or Jerome Groopman and you’ll have Inheritance—the new book by award-winning geneticist and New York Times bestselling author Sharon Moalem that reveals how genetic breakthroughs are transforming our understanding of the world … and ourselves. Conventional wisdom dictates that our genetic destiny is fixed at conception. But Inheritance shows us that the human genome is actually far more fluid, fascinating, and relevant then your ninth-grade high school biology teacher would have you believe. In this gene journey filled with authoritative, cutting-edge science based on immaculate research by one of the world’s leading authoritative voices on human genetics and health, Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD, we chart a riveting course destined to shatter all of our presuppositions about the fundamental nature of our genes. Moalem deftly brings readers to the bedside table of some of his most complicated genetic patients, and it is through these cases that we learn: how a trauma can be genetically passed down through generationsat what point during pregnancy shifted genes are passed along why a change in diet could alter genes and slow the aging process why some people are genetically born to be warriors and others worriers how insurance companies can use your genetic data to predict your (and therefore your childrens’) medical future, which can then impact the coverage decisions they make for you and your entire family, and so much more Turning the nature/nurture debate completely on its head, Inheritance will dazzle readers as they learn how to apply this compendium of groundbreaking genetic research into their daily lives and take control of their genetic destiny in a way that their parents could only have dreamed of.

    Available Formats: Download

    Inheritance

    By Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD, with Matthew D. LaPlante
    6.7 hrs • 4/15/14 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
  8. 8.9 hrs • 2/1/2014 • Unabridged

    A fascinating survey of the forces that shape who we are and how we act from the author of The Calculus Diaries Following her previous tours through the worlds of physics  and calculus, acclaimed science writer Jennifer Ouellette now turns her attention to the mysteries of human identity and behavior with Me, Myself, and Why. She draws on genetics, neuroscience, and psychology—enlivened as always with her signature sense of humor and pop-culture references—to explore how we become who we are. Ouellette lets listeners in on her own surprising journey of self-discover, as she has her genome sequenced, her brain mapped, her personality typed, and even samples a popular hallucinogen. Bringing together everything from Mendel’s famous pea plant experiments and mutations in The X-Men to our taste in food and our relationship with avatars and our online selves, Ouellette delivers another fun and enlightening work of popular science that’s sure to be enjoyed by her many fans.

    Available Formats: Download

    Me, Myself, and Why

    8.9 hrs • 2/1/14 • Unabridged
    Download
  9. 10.4 hrs • 1/1/2014 • Unabridged

    “In high school, I wondered whether the Jamaican Americans who made our track team so successful might carry some special speed gene from their tiny island. In college, I ran against Kenyans, and wondered whether endurance genes might have traveled with them from East Africa. At the same time, I began to notice that a training group on my team could consist of five men who run next to one another, stride for stride, day after day, and nonetheless turn out five entirely different runners. How could this be?” We all knew a star athlete in high school. The one who made it look so easy. He was the starting quarterback and shortstop; she was the all-state point guard and high-jumper. They were naturals—or were they? The debate is as old as physical competition. Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports, or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training? The truth is far messier than a simple dichotomy between nature and nurture. In the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, researchers have slowly begun to uncover how the relationship between biological endowments and a competitor’s training environment affects athleticism. Sports scientists have gradually entered the era of modern genetic research. In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success, Sports Illustrated senior writer David Epstein tackles the great nature versus nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving this great riddle. He investigates the so-called ten-thousand-hour rule to uncover whether rigorous and consistent practice from a young age is the only route to athletic excellence. Along the way Epstein dispels many of our perceptions about why top athletes excel. He shows why some skills that we assume are innate, like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball or cricket batter, are not and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like an athlete’s will to train, might in fact have important genetic components. This subject necessarily involves digging deep into sensitive topics like race and gender. Epstein explores controversial questions such as: Are black athletes genetically predetermined to dominate both sprinting and distance running, and are their abilities influenced by Africa’s geography? Are there genetic reasons to separate male and female athletes in competition? Should we test the genes of young children to determine if they are destined for stardom? Can genetic testing determine who is at risk of injury, brain damage, or even death on the field? Through on-the-ground reporting from below the equator and above the Arctic Circle, revealing conversations with leading scientists and Olympic champions, and interviews with athletes who have rare genetic mutations or physical traits, Epstein forces us to rethink the very nature of athleticism.

    Available Formats: CD

    The Sports Gene

    10.4 hrs • 1/1/14 • Unabridged
    CD
  10. 6.9 hrs • 10/17/2013 • Unabridged

    The renowned scientist and author of A Life Decoded examines the creation of life in the new field of synthetic genomics. In 2010, scientists led by J. Craig Venter became the first to successfully create “synthetic life”—putting humankind at the threshold of the most important and exciting phase of biological research, one that will enable us to actually write the genetic code for designing new species to help us adapt and evolve for long-term survival. The science of synthetic genomics will have a profound impact on human existence, including chemical and energy generation, health, clean water and food production, environmental control, and possibly even our evolution. In Life at the Speed of Light, Venter presents a fascinating and authoritative study of this emerging field from the inside—detailing its origins, current challenges and controversies, and projected effects on our lives. This scientific frontier provides an opportunity to ponder anew the age-old question, “What is life?” and examine what we really mean by “playing God.” Life at the Speed of Light is a landmark work, written by a visionary at the dawn of a new era of biological engineering.

    Available Formats: Download

    Life at the Speed of Light

    6.9 hrs • 10/17/13 • Unabridged
    Download
  11. 6.8 hrs • 8/29/2013 • Unabridged

    An entertaining investigation into the biology and psychology of why we sacrifice for other people Researchers are now applying the lens of science to study heroism for the first time. How do biology, upbringing, and outside influences intersect to produce altruistic and heroic behavior? And how can we encourage this behavior in corporations, classrooms, and individuals? Using dozens of fascinating real-life examples, Elizabeth Svoboda explains how our genes compel us to do good for others, how going through suffering is linked to altruism, and how acting heroic can greatly improve your mental health. She also reveals the concrete things we can do to encourage our most heroic selves to step forward. It’s a common misconception that heroes are heroic just because they’re innately predisposed to be that way. Svoboda shows why it’s not simply a matter of biological hardwiring and how anyone can be a hero if they’re committed to developing their heroic potential.

    Available Formats: Download

    What Makes a Hero

    6.8 hrs • 8/29/13 • Unabridged
    Download
  12. 10.4 hrs • 8/1/2013 • Unabridged

    We all knew a star athlete in high school. The one who made it look so easy. He was the starting quarterback and shortstop; she was the all-state point guard and high-jumper. Naturals. Or were they? The debate is as old as physical competition. Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports? Or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training? The truth is far messier than a simple dichotomy between nature and nurture. In the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, researchers have slowly begun to uncover how the relationship between biological endowments and a competitor’s training environment affects athleticism. Sports scientists have gradually entered the era of modern genetic research. In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success, Sports Illustrated senior writer David Epstein tackles the great nature vs. nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving this great riddle. He investigates the so-called ten-thousand-hour rule to uncover whether rigorous and consistent practice from a young age is the only route to athletic excellence. Along the way, Epstein dispels many of our perceptions about why top athletes excel. He shows why some skills that we assume are innate, like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball or cricket batter, are not, and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like an athlete’s will to train, might in fact have important genetic components.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Sports Gene

    10.4 hrs • 8/1/13 • Unabridged
    Download
  13. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    9.7 hrs • 5/14/2013 • Unabridged

    Philadelphia, 1959. A scientist scrutinizing a single human cell under a microscope detects a missing piece of DNA. That scientist, David Hungerford, had no way of knowing that he had stumbled upon the starting point of modern cancer research—the Philadelphia chromosome. This book charts not only that landmark discovery, but also—for the first time, all in one place—the full sequence of scientific and medical discoveries that brought about the first-ever successful treatment of a lethal cancer at the genetic level. The significance of this mutant chromosome would take more than three decades to unravel; in 1990, it was recognized as the sole cause of a deadly blood cancer, chronic myeloid leukemia, or CML. This dramatic discovery launched a race involving doctors and researchers around the world, who recognized that it might be possible to target CML at its genetic source. Science journalist Jessica Wapner brings extensive original reporting to this book, including interviews with more than thirty-five people with a direct role in this story. Wapner reconstructs more than forty years of crucial breakthroughs, clearly explains the science behind them, and pays tribute to the dozens of researchers, doctors, and patients whose curiosity and determination restored the promise of a future to the 70,000 people worldwide who are diagnosed with CML each year. Chief among them is researcher and oncologist Dr. Brian Druker, whose dedication to his patients fueled his quest to do everything within his power to save them. The Philadelphia Chromosome helps us fully appreciate just how ground-breaking, hard-won, and consequential these achievements are—and understand the principles behind today’s most important cancer research.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Philadelphia Chromosome

    9.7 hrs • 5/14/13 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
  14. 9.8 hrs • 9/11/2012 • Unabridged

    An enlightening investigation of the Pleistocene’s dual character as a geologic time—and as a cultural idea The Pleistocene is the epoch of geologic time closest to our own. It’s a time of ice ages, global migrations, and mass extinctions—of woolly rhinos, mammoths, giant ground sloths, and not least early species of Homo. It’s the world that created ours. But outside that environmental story there exists a parallel narrative that describes how our ideas about the Pleistocene have emerged. This story explains the place of the Pleistocene in shaping intellectual culture, and the role of a rapidly evolving culture in creating the idea of the Pleistocene and in establishing its dimensions. This second story addresses how the epoch, its Earth-shaping events, and its creatures, both those that survived and those that disappeared, helped kindle new sciences and a new origins story as the sciences split from the humanities as a way of looking at the past. Ultimately, it is the story of how the dominant creature to emerge from the frost-and-fire world of the Pleistocene came to understand its place in the scheme of things. A remarkable synthesis of science and history, The Last Lost World describes the world that made our modern one.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Last Lost World

    9.8 hrs • 9/11/12 • Unabridged
    Download
  15. 13.4 hrs • 9/1/2012 • Unabridged

    A genetic portrait of America In this fascinating exploration, geneticist Bryan Sykes turns his sights on the United States, one of the most genetically variegated countries in the world. From the blue-blooded pockets of old-WASP New England to the vast tribal lands of the Navajo, Bryan Sykes takes us on a historical genetic tour, interviewing genealogists, geneticists, anthropologists, and everyday Americans with compelling ancestral stories.

    Available Formats: Download

    DNA USA

    13.4 hrs • 9/1/12 • Unabridged
    Download
  16. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    12.6 hrs • 7/17/2012 • Unabridged

    In The Disappearing Spoon, New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean unlocked the mysteries of the periodic table. In The Violinist’s Thumb, he explores the wonders of the magical building block of life: DNA. There are genes to explain crazy cat ladies, why other people have no fingerprints, and why some people survive nuclear bombs. Genes illuminate everything from JFK’s bronze skin (it wasn’t a tan) to Einstein’s genius. They prove that Neanderthals and humans bred thousands of years more recently than any of us would feel comfortable thinking. They can even allow some people, because of the exceptional flexibility of their thumbs and fingers, to become truly singular violinists. Kean’s vibrant storytelling once again makes science entertaining, explaining human history and whimsy while showing how DNA will influence our species’ future.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Violinist’s Thumb

    Read by Henry Leyva
    12.6 hrs • 7/17/12 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    Download
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions