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Human Anatomy & Physiology

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  1. 7.6 hrs • 9/13/2016 • Unabridged

    Combining leading theories of psychology and behavior with case studies and practical advice, National Geographic’s Mind explores the question we all enjoy asking: Who am I? A companion to National Geographic’s Body and Brain, this reference explores today’s theories of personality, mixing scientific theory with an underlying message: by knowing more about your own psychology, you can have a better life. Chapters start with the anatomy, evolution, and development of the human brain, then move into such areas as intuition, creativity, motivation, faith, and ethics—all facets of a unique personality. Interesting scenarios of mental health and mental deviance make for a lively, readable narrative that combines today’s leading theories in the science of the mind and personality with life-enhancing questions, quizzes, practices, and tools for self-discovery. An entertaining book about science, Mind connects with the listener in a very personal and ultimately helpful way.

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    Mind by Patricia Daniels

    Mind

    Foreword by Todd B. Kashdan
    7.6 hrs • 9/13/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    2.3 hrs • 4/7/2015 • Unabridged

    Allergies, asthma, obesity, stomach aches, acne: these are just a few of the conditions that may be caused—and cured—by the microscopic life inside us. Understand how to use groundbreaking science to improve your health, mood, and more. In just the last few years, scientists have shown how the microscopic ecosystem within our bodies—particularly within our intestines—has an astonishing impact on our lives. Pioneering scientist Rob Knight and award-winning science journalist Brendan Buhler explain—with humor and witty metaphors—why these new findings matter to everyone. You are mostly not you. The human gut is host to trillions of microbes, and evidence shows that small changes in these microbes present (altered by antibiotics, diet, geographic region, and so on) may affect weight, likelihood of disease, and even psychological factors like risk-taking behavior. The evidence for their influence is astonishing. Rob Knight is one of the key figures driving forward this new science. His work demonstrates the startling connection between the presence of certain harmless bacteria and the health benefits we all seek—for ourselves and our children. In Follow Your Gut, Knight pairs with Brendan Buhler, an award-winning science writer, to explore the previously unseen world inside our bodies. With a practical eye toward deeper knowledge and better decisions, they lead a detailed tour of our “microbiome” as well as an exploration of the known effects of antibiotics, probiotics, diet choices, birth method, and access to livestock on our children’s lifelong health. Ultimately, this pioneering book explains how to learn about your own “microbiome” and take steps toward understanding and improving your health, using the latest research as a guide.

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    Follow Your Gut

    By Rob Knight, with Brendan Buhler
    Read by Rob Knight
    2.3 hrs • 4/7/15 • Unabridged
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  3. 1.9 hrs • 3/17/2015 • Unabridged

    Why do we get hung over? What would happen if you stopped sleeping? Is binge-watching TV actually bad for you? Why should I take a power nap? In their first book, Mitchell Moffit and Greg Brown, the geniuses behind YouTube channel AsapSCIENCE, explain the true science of how things work in their trademark, hilarious and fascinating fashion. Applying the fun, illustrated format of their addictive videos to topics ranging from brain freeze to hiccups to the science of the snooze button, AsapSCIENCE takes the underpinnings of biology, chemistry, physics, and other hard sciences and applies them to everyday life through quirky and relatable examples, appealing to both science nerds and those who didn’t ace chemistry. This is the science that people actually want to learn, shared in a friendly, engaging style. And in the spirit of science, no subject is taboo. Amid the humor is great information and cocktail conversation fodder, all thoughtfully presented. Whether you’re a total newbie or the next Albert Einstein, this guide is sure to educate and entertain.

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    AsapSCIENCE

    1.9 hrs • 3/17/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 12.1 hrs • 2/3/2015 • Unabridged

    The secret history of our most vital organ—the human heart The Man Who Touched His Own Heart tells the raucous, gory, and mesmerizing story of the heart, from the first “explorers” who dug up cadavers and plumbed their hearts’ chambers, through the first heart surgeries—which had to be completed in three minutes before death arrived—to heart transplants and the latest medical efforts to prolong our hearts’ lives, almost defying nature in the process. Thought of as the seat of our soul, then as a mysteriously animated object, the heart is still more a mystery than it is understood. Why do most animals only get one billion beats? How did modern humans get to over two billion beats—effectively letting us live out two lives? Why are sufferers of gingivitis more likely to have heart attacks? Why do we often undergo expensive procedures when cheaper ones are just as effective? What do Leonardo da Vinci, Mary Shelley, and contemporary Egyptian archaeologists have in common? And what does it really feel like to touch your own heart or to have someone else’s beating inside your chest? Rob Dunn’s fascinating history of our hearts brings us deep inside the science, history, and stories of the four chambers we depend on most.

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    The Man Who Touched His Own Heart

    Read by Robert Fass
    12.1 hrs • 2/3/15 • Unabridged
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  5. 8.7 hrs • 10/30/2014 • Unabridged

    The world of high-performance athletics is changing forever. Not so long ago, you could compete at the top level with hard work and a good coach, but today, it’s impossible to separate the achievements of athletes from the scientists who support them. In Faster, Higher, Stronger, veteran journalist Mark McClusky brings readers behind the scenes with a new generation of athletes, coaches, and scientists whose accomplishments are changing our understanding of human physical achievement and completely redefining the limits of the human body. At the exciting new frontier of sports, science, and technology, the book exploresthe role that genes and training play;how to find hidden champions and fast-track greatness;the truth about the ten-thousand–hours rule;new research on breaking through fatigue;revolutions in data and nutrition; andhow we can apply the lessons about focus, dedication, and sheer ingenuity in our own lives. Brimming with cutting-edge science and gripping anecdotes, Faster, Higher, Stronger is a fascinating, exhilarating look at how far we can push the boundaries of our bodies and minds.

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    Faster, Higher, Stronger by Mark McClusky

    Faster, Higher, Stronger

    8.7 hrs • 10/30/14 • Unabridged
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    12.7 hrs • 10/9/2014 • Unabridged

    We are doomed to repeat history if we fail to learn from it, but how are we affected by the forces that are invisible to us? In The Invisible History of the Human Race, Christine Kenneally draws on cutting-edge research to reveal how both historical artifacts and DNA tell us where we come from and where we may be going. While some books explore our genetic inheritance and popular television shows celebrate ancestry, this is the first book to explore how everything from DNA to emotions to names and the stories that form our lives are all part of our human legacy. Kenneally shows how trust is inherited in Africa, silence is passed down in Tasmania, and how the history of nations is written in our DNA. From fateful, ancient encounters to modern mass migrations and medical diagnoses, Kenneally explains how the forces that shaped the history of the world ultimately shape each human who inhabits it. The Invisible History of the Human Race is a deeply researched, carefully crafted, and provocative perspective on how our stories, psychology, and genetics affect our past and our future.

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    The Invisible History of the Human Race

    12.7 hrs • 10/9/14 • Unabridged
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  7. 8.7 hrs • 9/30/2014 • Unabridged

    A critically important and startling look at the harmful effects of overusing antibiotics, from the field’s leading expert Tracing one scientist’s journey toward understanding the crucial importance of the microbiome, this revolutionary book will take readers to the forefront of trail-blazing research while revealing the damage that overuse of antibiotics is doing to our health: contributing to the rise of obesity, asthma, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer. In Missing Microbes, Dr. Martin Blaser invites us into the wilds of the human microbiome where for hundreds of thousands of years bacterial and human cells have existed in a peaceful symbiosis that is responsible for the health and equilibrium of our body. Now, this invisible eden is being irrevocably damaged by some of our most revered medical advances—antibiotics—threatening the extinction of our irreplaceable microbes with terrible health consequences. Taking us into both the lab and deep into the fields where these troubling effects can be witnessed firsthand, Blaser not only provides cutting edge evidence for the adverse effects of antibiotics, he tells us what we can do to avoid even more catastrophic health problems in the future.

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    Missing Microbes

    8.7 hrs • 9/30/14 • Unabridged
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  8. 1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
    7.5 hrs • 7/29/2014 • Unabridged

    From the codirector of the Mayo Clinic / Arizona State University Obesity Solutions Initiative and inventor of the treadmill desk comes a fascinating wake-up call about our sedentary lifestyle. That the average adult spends 50 to 70 percent of their day sitting is no surprise to anyone who works in an office environment. But few realize the health consequences they are suffering as a result of modernity’s increasingly sedentary lifestyle, or the effects it has had on society at large. In Get Up!, health expert James A. Levine’s original scientific research shows that today’s chair-based world, where we no longer use our bodies as they evolved to be used, is having negative consequences on our health, and is a leading cause of diabetes, cancer, and heart disease. Over the decades, humans have moved from a primarily active lifestyle to one that is largely sedentary, and this change has reshaped every facet of our lives—from social interaction to classroom design. Levine shows how to throw off the shackles of inertia and reverse these negative trends through simple changes in our daily lives.

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    Get Up! by James A. Levine

    Get Up!

    7.5 hrs • 7/29/14 • Unabridged
    1 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5 (1)
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  9. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    14.9 hrs • 10/1/2013 • Unabridged

    In a book that illuminates, as never before, the evolutionary story of the human body, Daniel Lieberman deftly examines the major transformations that contributed key adaptations to the body: the advent of bipedalism, the shift to a nonfruit-based diet, the rise of hunting and gathering, our superlative endurance athletic abilities, the development of a very large brain, and the incipience of modern cultural abilities. He elucidates how cultural evolution differs from biological evolution and how it further transformed our bodies during the agricultural andiIndustrial revolutions. Lieberman illuminates how these ongoing changes have brought many benefits but also have created novel conditions to which our bodies are not entirely adapted, resulting in a growing incidence of obesity and new but avoidable diseases, including type 2 diabetes. He proposes that many of these chronic illnesses persist and in some cases are intensifying because of “dysevolution,” a pernicious dynamic whereby only the symptoms rather than the causes of these maladies are treated. And finally, provocatively, he advocates the use of evolutionary information to help nudge, push, and sometimes oblige us to create a more health-giving environment.

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    The Story of the Human Body

    14.9 hrs • 10/1/13 • Unabridged
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  10. 10.1 hrs • 3/19/2013 • Unabridged

    How is it possible to have vivid memories of something that never happened? How can siblings remember the same event from their childhoods so differently? Do the selections and distortions of memory reveal a truth about the self? Why are certain memories tied to specific places? Does your memory really get worse as you get older? A new consensus is emerging among cognitive scientists: rather than possessing fixed, unchanging memories, we create recollections anew each time we are called upon to remember. As psychologist Charles Fernyhough explains, remembering is an act of narrative imagination as much as it is the product of a neurological process. In Pieces of Light, he eloquently illuminates this compelling scientific breakthrough via a series of personal stories—a visit to his college campus to see if his memories hold up, an interview with his 93-year-old grandmother, conversations with those whose memories are affected by brain damage and trauma—each illustrating memory’s complex synergy of cognitive and neurological functions. Fernyhough guides readers through the fascinating new science of autobiographical memory, covering topics including imagination and the power of sense associations to cue remembering. Exquisitely written and meticulously researched, Pieces of Light brings together science and literature, the ordinary and the extraordinary, to help us better understand the ways we remember—and the ways we forget.

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    Pieces of Light

    10.1 hrs • 3/19/13 • Unabridged
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  11. 7.2 hrs • 1/29/2013 • Unabridged

    Early birds and night owls are born, not made. Sleep patterns may be the most obvious manifestation of the highly individualized biological clocks we inherit, but these clocks also regulate bodily functions from digestion to hormone levels to cognition. Living at odds with our internal timepieces, Till Roenneberg shows, can make us chronically sleep deprived and more likely to smoke, gain weight, feel depressed, fall ill, and fail geometry. By understanding and respecting our internal time, we can live better. Internal Time combines storytelling with accessible science tutorials to explain how our internal clocks work, why, for example, morning classes are so unpopular and why “lazy” adolescents are wise to avoid them. We learn why the constant twilight of our largely indoor lives makes us dependent on alarm clocks and tired, and why social demands and work schedules lead to a social jet lag that compromises our daily functioning. Many of the factors that make us early or late “chronotypes” are beyond our control, but that doesn’t make us powerless. Roenneberg recommends that the best way to sync our internal time with our external environment and feel better is to get more sunlight. Such simple steps as cycling to work and eating breakfast outside may be the tickets to a good night’s sleep, better overall health, and less grouchiness in the morning.

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    Internal Time

    7.2 hrs • 1/29/13 • Unabridged
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  12. 9.8 hrs • 9/11/2012 • Unabridged

    An enlightening investigation of the Pleistocene’s dual character as a geologic time—and as a cultural idea The Pleistocene is the epoch of geologic time closest to our own. It’s a time of ice ages, global migrations, and mass extinctions—of woolly rhinos, mammoths, giant ground sloths, and not least early species of Homo. It’s the world that created ours. But outside that environmental story there exists a parallel narrative that describes how our ideas about the Pleistocene have emerged. This story explains the place of the Pleistocene in shaping intellectual culture, and the role of a rapidly evolving culture in creating the idea of the Pleistocene and in establishing its dimensions. This second story addresses how the epoch, its Earth-shaping events, and its creatures, both those that survived and those that disappeared, helped kindle new sciences and a new origins story as the sciences split from the humanities as a way of looking at the past. Ultimately, it is the story of how the dominant creature to emerge from the frost-and-fire world of the Pleistocene came to understand its place in the scheme of things. A remarkable synthesis of science and history, The Last Lost World describes the world that made our modern one.

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    The Last Lost World

    9.8 hrs • 9/11/12 • Unabridged
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  13. 0 reviews 0 5 4 4 out of 5 stars 4/5
    12.6 hrs • 7/17/2012 • Unabridged

    In The Disappearing Spoon, New York Times bestselling author Sam Kean unlocked the mysteries of the periodic table. In The Violinist’s Thumb, he explores the wonders of the magical building block of life: DNA. There are genes to explain crazy cat ladies, why other people have no fingerprints, and why some people survive nuclear bombs. Genes illuminate everything from JFK’s bronze skin (it wasn’t a tan) to Einstein’s genius. They prove that Neanderthals and humans bred thousands of years more recently than any of us would feel comfortable thinking. They can even allow some people, because of the exceptional flexibility of their thumbs and fingers, to become truly singular violinists. Kean’s vibrant storytelling once again makes science entertaining, explaining human history and whimsy while showing how DNA will influence our species’ future.

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    The Violinist’s Thumb

    Read by Henry Leyva
    12.6 hrs • 7/17/12 • Unabridged
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  14. 12.3 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    The genome's been mapped. But what does it mean? Arguably the most significant scientific discovery of the new century, the mapping of the twenty-three pairs of chromosomes that make up the human genome raises almost as many questions as it answers. Questions that will profoundly impact the way we think about disease, about longevity, and about free will. Questions that will affect the rest of your life. Genome offers extraordinary insight into the ramifications of this incredible breakthrough. By picking one newly discovered gene from each pair of chromosomes and telling its story, Matt Ridley recounts the history of our species and its ancestors from the dawn of life to the brink of future medicine. From Huntington's disease to cancer, from the applications of gene therapy to the horrors of eugenics, Matt Ridley probes the scientific, philosophical, and moral issues arising as a result of the mapping of the genome. It will help you understand what this scientific milestone means for you, for your children, and for humankind.

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    Genome

    12.3 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  15. 8.5 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    From the Pulitzer Prize–winning science writer Jonathan Weiner comes a fast-paced and astonishing scientific adventure story: has the long-sought secret of eternal youth at last been found? In recent years, the dream of eternal youth has started to look like more than just a dream. In the twentieth century alone, life expectancy increased by more than thirty years—almost as much time as humans have gained in the whole span of human existence. Today a motley array of scientists, researchers, and entrepreneurs believe that another, bigger leap is at hand—that human immortality is not only possible, but attainable in our own time. Is there genius or folly in the dreams of these charismatic but eccentric thinkers? In Long for This World, Jonathan Weiner, a natural storyteller and an intrepid reporter with a gift for making cutting-edge science understandable, takes the listener on a whirlwind intellectual quest to find out. From Berkeley to the Bronx, from Cambridge University to Dante’s tomb in Ravenna, Weiner meets the leading intellectuals in the field and delves into the mind-blowing science behind the latest research. He traces the centuries-old, fascinating history of the quest for longevity in art, science, and literature, from Gilgamesh to Shakespeare, Doctor Faustus to “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” And he tells the dramatic story of how aging could be conquered once and for all, focusing on the ideas of those who believe aging is a curable disease. Chief among them is the extraordinary Aubrey de Grey, a garrulous Englishman who bears more than a passing resemblance to Methuselah (at 969 years, the oldest man in the Bible), and who is perhaps immortality’s most radical and engaging true believer. A rollicking scientific adventure story in the grand manner of Oliver Sacks, Long for This World is science writing of the highest order and with the highest stakes. Could we live forever? And if we could, would we want to?

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    Long for This World

    8.5 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  16. 10.5 hrs • 6/14/2012 • Unabridged

    How risk taking transforms our body chemistry, driving us to extremes of euphoria and risky behavior—or stress and depression In this eye-opening book, Coates—a former Wall Street trader and now a world-class neuroscientist—describes the role our biology plays in our risk-taking behavior. Coates brings his research to life by telling a story of fictional traders who get caught up in a bubble and then a crash. As these traders place their bets and live with the results, Coates looks inside their bodies to describe the physiology driving them into irrational exuberance and then pessimism. The result is a riveting tale and a penetrating insight into how traders’—and indeed all humans’—bodies guide their risk taking, endowing them with fast reactions and gut feelings; but how their biology can also lead them to extremes of euphoria or anxiety and stress, thereby wreaking havoc on the economy. Coates extends his conclusions to all types of high-pressure decision making—from the sports field to the battlefield.

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    The Hour between Dog and Wolf by John Coates

    The Hour between Dog and Wolf

    10.5 hrs • 6/14/12 • Unabridged
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