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Emigration & Immigration

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  1. 13.0 hrs • 1/26/2016 • Unabridged

    More than 27 million Americans today can trace their lineage to the Scots, whose bloodline was stained by centuries of continuous warfare along the border between England and Scotland, and later in the bitter settlements of England’s Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland. Between 250,000 and 400,000 Scots-Irish migrated to America in the eighteenth century, traveling in groups of families and bringing with them not only long experience as rebels and outcasts but also unparalleled skills as frontiersmen and guerrilla fighters. Their cultural identity reflected acute individualism, dislike of aristocracy, and a military tradition, and, over time, the Scots-Irish defined the attitudes and values of the military, of working class America, and even of the peculiarly populist form of American democracy itself. Born Fighting is the first book to chronicle the full journey of this remarkable cultural group, and the profound, but unrecognized, role it has played in the shaping of America. Written with the storytelling verve that has earned his works such acclaim as “captivating . . . unforgettable” (the Wall Street Journal on Lost Soliders), Scots-Irishman James Webb, Vietnam combat veteran and former Naval secretary, traces the history of his people, beginning nearly two thousand years ago at Hadrian’s Wall, when the nation of Scotland was formed north of the Wall through armed conflict in contrast to England’s formation to the south through commerce and trade. Webb recounts the Scots’ odyssey—their clashes with the English in Scotland and then in Ulster, their retreat from one war-ravaged land to another. Through engrossing chronicles of the challenges the Scots-Irish faced, Webb vividly portrays how they developed the qualities that helped settle the American frontier and define the American character. Born Fighting shows that the Scots-Irish were 40 percent of the Revolutionary War army; they included the pioneers Daniel Boone, Lewis and Clark, Davy Crockett, and Sam Houston; they were the writers Edgar Allan Poe and Mark Twain; and they have given America numerous great military leaders, including Stonewall Jackson, Ulysses S. Grant, Audie Murphy, and George S. Patton, as well as most of the soldiers of the Confederacy (only five percent of whom owned slaves, and who fought against what they viewed as an invading army). It illustrates how the Scots-Irish redefined American politics, creating the populist movement and giving the country a dozen presidents, including Andrew Jackson, Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. And it explores how the Scots-Irish culture of isolation, hard luck, stubbornness, and mistrust of the nation’s elite formed and still dominates blue-collar America, the military services, the Bible Belt, and country music. Both a distinguished work of cultural history and a human drama that speaks straight to the heart of contemporary America, Born Fighting reintroduces America to its most powerful, patriotic, and individualistic cultural group—one too often ignored or taken for granted.

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    Born Fighting

    13.0 hrs • 1/26/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 6.3 hrs • 4/29/2015 • Unabridged

    Published for the fortieth anniversary of the final days of the Vietnam War, They Are All My Family is the suspenseful and moving tale of how John P. Riordan, an assistant manager of Citibank’s Saigon branch, devised a daring plan to save 106 Vietnamese from the dangers of the Communist takeover. Riordan—who had left the military behind for a career in international banking—was not the type to take dramatic action, but once the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon in April 1975, and it was clear that Riordan’s Vietnamese colleagues and their families would be stranded in a city teetering on total collapse, he knew that he could not leave them behind. Defying the objections of his superiors and going against the official policy of the United States, Riordan went back into Saigon to save them. In fifteen harrowing trips to Saigon’s airport, he maneuvered through the bureaucratic shambles, claiming that the Vietnamese were his wife and scores of children. It was a ruse that, at times, veered close to failure, yet against all odds, the improbable plan succeeded. They Are All My Family is a vivid narrative of an ingenious strategy that transformed a time of enormous peril into a display of extraordinary courage.

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    They Are All My Family

    6.3 hrs • 4/29/15 • Unabridged
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  3. 9.7 hrs • 4/7/2015 • Unabridged

    The facts of the tragedy are established: On April 15, 2013, two homemade bombs fashioned from pressure cookers exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and wounding 264 others. The elder of the brothers suspected of committing this atrocity, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, died in the ensuing manhunt; Dzhokhar will stand trial in January 2015. What we don’t know is why. How did such a nightmare come to pass? This is a probing and powerful story of dislocation, and the longing for clarity and identity that can reach the point of combustion. Bestselling Russian-American author Masha Gessen is uniquely endowed with the background, access, and talent to tell it. She explains who the brothers were and how they came to do what they appear to have done. From their displaced beginnings as descendants of ethnic Chechens, Gessen follows them as they are displaced again, from strife-ridden Kyrgyzstan eventually to the United States, into an utterly disorienting new world. Most crucially, she reconstructs the struggle between assimilation and alienation that ensued for each of the brothers, fueling their apparent metamorphosis into a new breed of homegrown terrorist, with their feet on American soil but their loyalties elsewhere—a split in identity that seems to have incubated a deadly sense of mission. Like Dave Cullen’s Columbine, this will be the enduring account of an indelible tragedy.

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    The Brothers

    9.7 hrs • 4/7/15 • Unabridged
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  4. 10.5 hrs • 6/1/2014 • Unabridged

    An exciting, hugely revealing account of China’s burgeoning presence in Africa—a developing empire already shaping, and reshaping, the future of millions of people A prizewinning foreign correspondent and former New York Times bureau chief in Shanghai and in West and Central Africa, Howard French is uniquely positioned to tell the story of China in Africa. Through meticulous on-the-ground reporting—conducted in Mandarin, French, and Portuguese, among other languages—French crafts a layered investigation of astonishing depth and breadth as he engages not only with policy-shaping moguls and diplomats but also with the ordinary men and women navigating the street-level realities of cooperation, prejudice, corruption, and opportunity forged by this seismic geopolitical development. With incisiveness and empathy, French reveals the human face of China’s economic, political, and human presence across the African continent—and in doing so reveals what is at stake for everyone involved. We meet a broad spectrum of China’s dogged emigrant population, from those singlehandedly reshaping African infrastructure, commerce, and even environment to those just barely scraping by, still convinced that Africa affords them better opportunities than their homeland. And we encounter an equally panoramic array of African responses: a citizens’ backlash in Senegal against a “Trojan horse” Chinese construction project; a Zambian political candidate who, having protested China’s intrusiveness during the previous election and lost, now turns accommodating; the ascendant middle class of an industrial boomtown; African mine workers bitterly condemning their foreign employers, citing inadequate safety precautions and wages a fraction of their immigrant counterparts’. French’s nuanced portraits reveal the paradigms forming around this new world order, from the all-too-familiar echoes of colonial ambition—exploitation of resources and labor, cut-rate infrastructure projects, dubious treaties—to new frontiers of cultural and economic exchange, where dichotomies of suspicion and trust, assimilation and isolation, idealism and disillusionment are in dynamic flux. Part intrepid travelogue, part cultural census, part industrial and political exposé, French’s keenly observed account ultimately offers a fresh perspective on the most pressing unknowns of modern Sino-African relations: why China is making the incursions it is, just how extensive its cultural and economic inroads are, what Africa’s role in the equation is, and just what the ramifications for both parties—and the watching world—will be in the foreseeable future.

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    China’s Second Continent

    10.5 hrs • 6/1/14 • Unabridged
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  5. 8.8 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    The author of Across the Wire offers brilliant investigative reporting of what went wrong when, in May 2001, a group of twenty-six men attempted to cross the Mexican border into the desert of southern Arizona. Only twelve men came back out.

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    The Devil’s Highway

    8.8 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  6. 11.2 hrs • 9/20/2011 • Unabridged

    Inspired by the author's widely acclaimed New York Times article, The New Kids is immersion reporting at its most compelling. Brooke Hauser takes us deep inside a unique New York City high school over the course of a year as she follows diverse newcomers whose lives are at once ordinary and extraordinary, international headlines brought to life. No native English-speaking students attend the International High School, and more than twenty-eight languages fill the halls. The students in this modern-day Babel apply to college, fall in love, and rebel against their families like normal teenagers, but many deal with enormous obstacles - traumas and wars in their countries of origin that haunt them and pressures from their cultures to marry or drop out and go to work.

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    The New Kids

    11.2 hrs • 9/20/11 • Unabridged
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  7. 16.2 hrs • 2/15/2011 • Unabridged

    Maya Jasanoff won the National Book Critics Circle Award for her groundbreaking work Liberty’s Exiles. After the American Revolution, sixty thousand British loyalists fled the US for Canada, the Caribbean, India, and other points abroad. Jasanoff traces their harrowing journeys across the globe, shedding light on their ambitions, the postrevolutionary world they encountered, and their legacies.

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    Liberty’s Exiles

    16.2 hrs • 2/15/11 • Unabridged
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  8. 16.2 hrs • 5/19/2010 • Unabridged

    Conquests and Cultures is the culmination of fifteen years of research and travels that have taken the author completely around the world twice. Its purpose has been to try to understand the role of cultural differences within nations and between nations, today and over the centuries of history, in shaping the economic and social fates of peoples and of whole civilizations. Focusing on four major cultural areas—that of the British, the Africans (including the African Diaspora), the Slavs of Eastern Europe, and the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere, Conquests and Cultures reveals patterns that encompass not only these people but others and helps explain the role of cultural evolution in economic, social, and political development.

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    Conquests and Cultures

    16.2 hrs • 5/19/10 • Unabridged
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  9. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    16.4 hrs • 5/14/2010 • Unabridged

    Bestselling author Thomas Sowell brings his insight and erudition to bear on one of the key issues of our time—immigration—supplying context, insight, and reason to an inflamed debate that could very well dissolve the social fabric of our country. Most commentators look at the issue of immigration from the viewpoint of immediate politics. In doing so, they focus on only a piece of the issue and lose touch with the larger picture. Now Thomas Sowell offers a sweeping historical and global look at a large number of migrations over a long period of time. Migrations and Cultures shows the persistence of cultural traits in particular racial and ethnic groups, and the role these groups’ relocations play in redistributing skills, knowledge, and other forms of “human capital.” This book answers the question: What are the effects of disseminating the patterns of the particular set of skills, attitudes, and lifestyles each ethnic group has carried forth—both for the immigrants and for the host countries, in social as well as economic terms?

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    Migrations and Cultures

    16.4 hrs • 5/14/10 • Unabridged
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  10. 13.0 hrs • 4/21/2009 • Unabridged

    The extraordinary tale of a refugee youth soccer team and the transformation of a small American town. Clarkston, Georgia, was a typical Southern town until it was designated a refugee settlement center in the 1990s, becoming the first American home for scores of families in flight from the world’s war zones—from Liberia and Sudan to Iraq and Afghanistan. Suddenly Clarkston’s streets were filled with women wearing the hijab, the smells of cumin and curry, and kids of all colors playing soccer in any open space they could find. The town also became home to Luma Mufleh, an American-educated Jordanian woman who founded a youth soccer team to unify Clarkston’s refugee children and keep them off the streets. These kids named themselves the Fugees. Set against the backdrop of an American town that without its consent had become a vast social experiment, Outcasts United follows a pivotal season in the life of the Fugees and their charismatic coach. Warren St. John documents the lives of a diverse group of young people as they miraculously coalesce into a band of brothers, while also drawing a fascinating portrait of a fading American town struggling to accommodate its new arrivals. At the center of the story is fiery Coach Luma, who relentlessly drives her players to success on the soccer field while holding together their lives—and the lives of their families—in the face of a series of daunting challenges. This fast-paced chronicle of a single season is a complex and inspiring tale of a small town becoming a global community—and an account of the ingenious and complicated ways we create a home in a changing world.

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    Outcasts United

    13.0 hrs • 4/21/09 • Unabridged
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  11. 6.5 hrs • 4/21/2009 • Abridged

    The extraordinary tale of a refugee youth soccer team and the transformation of a small American town. Clarkston, Georgia, was a typical Southern town until it was designated a refugee settlement center in the 1990s, becoming the first American home for scores of families in flight from the world’s war zones—from Liberia and Sudan to Iraq and Afghanistan. Suddenly Clarkston’s streets were filled with women wearing the hijab, the smells of cumin and curry, and kids of all colors playing soccer in any open space they could find. The town also became home to Luma Mufleh, an American-educated Jordanian woman who founded a youth soccer team to unify Clarkston’s refugee children and keep them off the streets. These kids named themselves the Fugees. Set against the backdrop of an American town that without its consent had become a vast social experiment, Outcasts United follows a pivotal season in the life of the Fugees and their charismatic coach. Warren St. John documents the lives of a diverse group of young people as they miraculously coalesce into a band of brothers, while also drawing a fascinating portrait of a fading American town struggling to accommodate its new arrivals. At the center of the story is fiery Coach Luma, who relentlessly drives her players to success on the soccer field while holding together their lives—and the lives of their families—in the face of a series of daunting challenges. This fast-paced chronicle of a single season is a complex and inspiring tale of a small town becoming a global community—and an account of the ingenious and complicated ways we create a home in a changing world.

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    Outcasts United

    6.5 hrs • 4/21/09 • Abridged
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  12. 14.6 hrs • 1/5/2009 • Unabridged

    An eye-opening and previously untold story, Factory Girls is the first look into the everyday lives of the migrant factory population in China. China has 130 million migrant workers—the largest migration in human history. In Factory Girls, Leslie T. Chang, a former correspondent for the Wall Street Journal in Beijing, tells the story of these workers primarily through the lives of two young women, whom she follows over the course of three years as they attempt to rise from the assembly lines of Dongguan, an industrial city in China’s Pearl River Delta. As she tracks their lives, Chang paints a never-before-seen picture of migrant life—a world where nearly everyone is under thirty; where you can lose your boyfriend and your friends with the loss of a mobile phone; where a few computer or English lessons can catapult you into a completely different social class. Chang takes us inside a sneaker factory so large that it has its own hospital, movie theater, and fire department; to posh karaoke bars that are fronts for prostitution; to makeshift English classes where students shave their heads in monk-like devotion and sit day after day in front of machines watching English words flash by; and back to a farming village for the Chinese New Year, revealing the poverty and idleness of rural life that drive young girls to leave home in the first place. Throughout this riveting portrait, Chang also interweaves the story of her own family’s migrations, within China and to the west, providing historical and personal frames of reference for her investigation. A book of global significance that provides new insight into China, Factory Girls demonstrates how the mass movement from rural villages to cities is remaking individual lives and transforming Chinese society, much as immigration to America’s shores remade our own country a century ago.

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    Factory Girls

    14.6 hrs • 1/5/09 • Unabridged
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  13. 9.7 hrs • 1/2/2007 • Unabridged

    A fascinating look at the history and grandeur of bullfighting Death in the Afternoon is an impassioned look at bullfighting by one of its true aficionados. It reflects Hemingway's conviction that bullfighting was more than mere sport and reveals a rich source of inspiration for his art. The unrivaled drama of bullfighting, with its rigorous combination of athleticism and artistry, and its requisite display of grace under pressure, ignited Hemingway's imagination. Seen through his eyes, bullfighting becomes a richly choreographed ballet, with performers who range from awkward amateurs to masters of great elegance and cunning. Death in the Afternoon is also a deeper contemplation of the nature of cowardice and bravery, sport and tragedy, and is enlivened throughout by Hemingway's sharp commentary on life and literature.

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    Death in the Afternoon

    9.7 hrs • 1/2/07 • Unabridged
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  14. 6.4 hrs • 1/1/2005 • Unabridged

    What should we do to solve America's border crisis? Whatever it takes! That's the no-nonsense approach of Arizona congressman J. D. Hayworth, one of America's most outspoken and eloquent conservative spokesmen. J. D. has walked the border and seen firsthand the devastation that illegal immigration inflicts on law-abiding Americans. He's read the intelligence reports, talked to the Border Patrol and the Marines, and knows how intolerable illegal immigration is in a post-9/11 world. In Whatever It Takes, you'll learn how illegal immigration steals jobs from American workers and reduces their pay, how illegal immigrants often take advantage of health and education benefits at the expense of American citizens, how illegal immigrants are hastening the downfall of Social Security, and how can we prevent the next 9/11.

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    Whatever It Takes by Congressman J. D. Hayworth, Joseph J. Eule

    Whatever It Takes

    6.4 hrs • 1/1/06 • Unabridged
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  15. 4.4 hrs • 6/1/2004 • Unabridged

    The number of legal immigrants accelerated in the 1990s to an average of more than a million a year. That was up from just over 300,000 a year in the 1960s and 600,000 a year by the 1980s. When the number of illegal immigrants is added to this, the total inflow during the 1990s was approximately 12 million. That compares with 500,000 in the 1930s. Crowded Land of Liberty examines how this developed into a crisis contributing to overcrowded schools, soaring demand for social services, new burdens on taxpayers, increased urban congestion, and heightened job competition. The author explains how recent waves of immigration differ from those of earlier eras, and he explores new public policy alternatives.

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    Crowded Land of Liberty by Dirk Chase Eldredge

    Crowded Land of Liberty

    4.4 hrs • 6/1/04 • Unabridged
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  16. 8.3 hrs • 2/1/2001 • Unabridged

    Hailed by the New York Times as “one of the most inventive, brilliant novelists in the Western world,” Yoram Kaniuk turns his hand to nonfiction to bring us his most important work yet. It is the story of Yossi Harel, a modern-day Moses who defied the blockade of the British Mandate to deliver more than 24,000 displaced Holocaust survivors to Palestine, while the rest of the world—including the United States—closed its doors. Kaniuk pays homage to the young Israeli who was motivated not by politics or personal glory, but by the pleading eyes of the orphaned children languishing on the shores of Europe. Commander of the Exodus is both an unforgettable tribute to the heroism of the dispossessed, and a rich evocation of the vision and daring of a man who took it upon himself to reverse the course of history.

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    Commander of the Exodus by Yoram Kaniuk

    Commander of the Exodus

    Translated by Seymour Simckes
    8.3 hrs • 2/1/01 • Unabridged
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