221 Results for:

General

  • Sort by:
  • Best Selling
Results: 1 – 16 of 221
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. ...
  6. 14
  1. 14.6 hrs • 8/9/2016 • Unabridged

    For readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks comes a propulsive, haunting journey into the secret history of brain science by Luke Dittrich, whose grandfather performed the surgery that created the most studied human research subject of all time: the amnesic known as Patient H. M. In 1953, a twenty-seven-year-old factory worker named Henry Molaison—who suffered from severe epilepsy—received a radical new version of the then-common lobotomy, targeting the most mysterious structures in the brain. The operation failed to eliminate Henry’s seizures, but it did have an unintended effect: Henry was left profoundly amnesic, unable to create long-term memories. Over the next sixty years, Patient H. M., as Henry was known, became the most studied individual in the history of neuroscience, a human guinea pig who would teach us much of what we know about memory today. Patient H.M. is, at times, a deeply personal journey. Dittrich’s grandfather was the brilliant, morally complex surgeon who operated on Molaison—and thousands of other patients. The author’s investigation into the dark roots of modern memory science ultimately forces him to confront unsettling secrets in his own family history, and to reveal the tragedy that fueled his grandfather’s relentless experimentation—experimentation that would revolutionize our understanding of ourselves. Dittrich uses the case of Patient H. M. as a starting point for a kaleidoscopic journey, one that moves from the first recorded brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the cutting-edge laboratories of MIT. He takes readers inside the old asylums and operating theaters where psychosurgeons, as they called themselves, conducted their human experiments and behind the scenes of a bitter custody battle over the ownership of the most important brain in the world. Patient H. M. combines the best of biography, memoir, and science journalism to create a haunting, endlessly fascinating story, one that reveals the wondrous and devastating things that can happen when hubris, ambition, and human imperfection collide.

    Available Formats: Download

    Patient H.M.

    14.6 hrs • 8/9/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  2. 5.7 hrs • 5/31/2016 • Unabridged

    A deeply original celebration of George Lucas’ masterpiece as it relates to history, presidential politics, law, economics, fatherhood, and culture by Harvard legal scholar and former White House adviser. There’s Santa Claus, Shakespeare, Mickey Mouse, the Bible, and then there’s Star Wars. Nothing quite compares to sitting with down with a young child and hearing the sound of John Williams’ score as those beloved golden letters fill the screen. In this fun, erudite, and often moving book, Cass R. Sunstein explores the lessons of Star Wars as they relate to childhood, fathers, the Dark Side, rebellion, and redemption. As it turns out, Star Wars also has a lot to teach us about constitutional law, economics, and political uprisings. In rich detail, Sunstein tells the story of the films’ wildly unanticipated success and what it has to say about why some things succeed while others fail. Ultimately, Sunstein argues, Star Wars is about the freedom of choice and our never-ending ability to make the right decision when the chips are down. Written with buoyant prose and considerable heart, The World According to Star Wars shines new light on the most beloved story of our time.

    Available Formats: Download, CD, MP3 CD
    The World according to Star Wars by Cass R. Sunstein

    The World according to Star Wars

    5.7 hrs • 5/31/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD, MP3 CD
  3. 9.1 hrs • 5/10/2016 • Unabridged

    From the bestselling author of Traffic, a brilliant and entertaining exploration of our personal tastes—why we like the things we like, and what it says about us Everyone knows his or her favorite color, the foods we most enjoy, and which season of House of Cards deserves the most stars on Netflix. But what does it really mean when we like something? How do we decide what’s good? Is it something biological? What is the role of our personal experiences in shaping our tastes? And how do businesses make use of this information? Comprehensively researched and singularly insightful, You May Also Like delves deep into psychology, marketing, and neuroscience to answer these complex and fascinating questions. From the tangled underpinnings of our food choices, to the dynamics of the pop charts and our playlists, to our nonstop procession of “thumbs” and “likes” and “stars,” to our insecurity before unfamiliar works of art, the book explores how we form our preferences—and how they shape us. It explains how difficult it is, even for experts, to pinpoint exactly what makes something good or enjoyable, and how the success of companies such as Netflix, Spotify, and Yelp depends on the complicated task of predicting what we will enjoy. Like Traffic, this book takes us on a fascinating and consistently surprising intellectual journey that helps us better understand how we perceive and appreciate the world around us.

    Available Formats: CD, Download

    You May Also Like

    9.1 hrs • 5/10/16 • Unabridged
    CD
    Also: Download
  4. 8.5 hrs • 4/26/2016 • Unabridged

    In this lively contrarian romp through the American cultural landscape, Andrea Tantaros argues that the swapping of gender roles has had a drastic effect on relationships, families, the boardroom, the bedroom, and beyond. Women today have more choices and options than ever. So why are they so stressed out? In a covetous quest to attain what men have, women have been told we should work like men, behave like men, and have sex like men. There’s just one problem: women aren’t men. Instead of feeling at peace with their newfound freedoms, females are finding themselves tied up in knots—trying to strike a balance between their natural desires and what society dictates. Conservative political analyst and cohost of Fox News’ Outnumbered and The Five exposes the pitfalls that are entangling women everywhere thanks to the rise of female power, revealing the mass confusion it has caused among both sexes, and arguing that decades of progress for women hasn’t brought the happiness they were promised. With scathing wit and insight born of personal experience, Tantaros calls out those sending the wrong messages to American woman, including Lena Dunham, Miley Cyrus, Mika Brzezinski, Kim Kardashian, and Kris Jenner, and praises those who get it right like Beyonce and Millionaire Matchmaker’s Patti Stanger. She explores how women have taken men off the hook in dating, much to their own detriment, and exposes how we’ve become a sex and selfie obsessed nation that has damagingly traded intimacy for relentless self-exposure. Tied Up in Knots is the gut-check women need to assess the state of their personal unions, and to help them find out what they really want while staying true to their authentic selves.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    Tied Up in Knots

    8.5 hrs • 4/26/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD
  5. 14.6 hrs • 3/22/2016 • Unabridged

    Since its release in 1949, The Hero with a Thousand Faces has influenced millions of readers by combining the insights of modern psychology with Joseph Campbell’s revolutionary understanding of comparative mythology. In this audiobook, Campbell outlines the “Hero’s Journey,” a universal motif of adventure and transformation that runs through virtually all of the world’s mythic traditions. He also explores the “Cosmogonic Cycle,” the mythic pattern of world creation and destruction. As relevant today as when it was first published, The Hero with a Thousand Faces continues to find new audiences in fields ranging from religion and anthropology to literature and film studies. The book has also profoundly influenced creative artists—including authors, songwriters, game designers, and filmmakers—and continues to inspire all those interested in the inherent human need to tell stories.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Hero with a Thousand Faces

    14.6 hrs • 3/22/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  6. 2.3 hrs • 2/15/2016 • Abridged

    Since its first publication in 1908, Scouting for Boys has been one of the bestselling books in the English language. Subtitled A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship, the book draws on a miscellany of material, including Baden-Powell's own military experiences, and is credited with giving birth to the scout movement. The text covers the topics of Scoutcraft, Tracking and Observation, Woodcraft, Camp Life and First Aid, in addition to suggesting a range of scout activities and games. Written against a background of British colonialism, Scouting for Boys is both a fascinating historical document and a valuable guidebook for the modern scout.

    Available Formats: Download, Digital Rental
    Download
    Also: Digital Rental
  7. 7.0 hrs • 2/1/2016 • Unabridged

    Feature films, television shows, homemade videos, tweets, blogs, and breaking news: digital media offer an always-accessible, apparently inexhaustible supply of entertainment and information. Although choices seems endless, public attention is not. How do digital media find the audiences they need in an era of infinite choice? In The Marketplace of Attention, James Webster explains how audiences take shape in the digital age. Webster describes the factors that create audiences, including the preferences and habits of media users, the role of social networks, the resources and strategies of media providers, and the growing impact of media measures—from ratings to user recommendations. He incorporates these factors into one comprehensive framework: the marketplace of attention. In doing so, he shows that the marketplace works in ways that belie our greatest hopes and fears about digital media. Some observers claim that digital media empower a new participatory culture; others fear that digital media encourage users to retreat to isolated enclaves. Webster shows that public attention is at once diverse and concentrated, that users move across a variety of outlets, producing high levels of audience overlap. So although audiences are fragmented in ways that would astonish mid-century broadcasting executives, Webster argues that this doesn’t signal polarization. He questions whether our preferences are immune from media influence, and he describes how our encounters with media might change our tastes. In the digital era’s marketplace of attention, Webster claims, we typically encounter ideas that cut across our predispositions. In the process, we will remake the marketplace of ideas and reshape the twenty-first-century public sphere.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Marketplace of Attention

    7.0 hrs • 2/1/16 • Unabridged
    Download
  8. 6.5 hrs • 1/19/2016 • Unabridged

    Are you above average? Is your child an A student? Is your employee an introvert or an extrovert? Every day we are measured against the yardstick of averages, judged according to how closely we come to it or how far we deviate from it. The assumption that metrics comparing us to an average—like GPAs, personality test results, and performance review ratings—reveal something meaningful about our potential is so ingrained in our consciousness that we don’t even question it. That assumption, says Harvard’s Todd Rose, is spectacularly—and scientifically—wrong. In The End of Average, Rose, a rising star in the new field of the science of the individual shows that no one is average. Not you. Not your kids. Not your employees. This isn’t hollow sloganeering—it’s a mathematical fact with enormous practical consequences. But while we know people learn and develop in distinctive ways, these unique patterns of behaviors are lost in our schools and businesses which have been designed around the mythical “average person.” This average-size-fits-all model ignores our differences and fails at recognizing talent. It’s time to change it. Weaving science, history, and his personal experiences as a high school dropout, Rose offers a powerful alternative to understanding individuals through averages: the three principles of individuality. The jaggedness principle (talent is always jagged), the context principle (traits are a myth), and the pathways principle (we all walk the road less traveled) help us understand our true uniqueness—and that of others—and how to take full advantage of individuality to gain an edge in life. Read this powerful manifesto in the ranks of Drive, Quiet, and Mindset—and you won’t see averages or talent in the same way again.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    The End of Average

    6.5 hrs • 1/19/16 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD
  9. 0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    22.3 hrs • 12/15/2015 • Unabridged

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and now a documentary from Ken Burns on PBS, The Emperor of All Maladies is a magnificent, profoundly humane “biography” of cancer—from its first documented appearances thousands of years ago through the epic battles in the twentieth century to cure, control, and conquer it to a radical new understanding of its essence. Physician, researcher, and award-winning science writer, Siddhartha Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist’s precision, a historian’s perspective, and a biographer’s passion. The result is an astonishingly lucid and eloquent chronicle of a disease humans have lived with—and perished from—for more than five thousand years. The story of cancer is a story of human ingenuity, resilience, and perseverance, but also of hubris, paternalism, and misperception. Mukherjee recounts centuries of discoveries, setbacks, victories, and deaths, told through the eyes of his predecessors and peers, training their wits against an infinitely resourceful adversary that, just three decades ago, was thought to be easily vanquished in an all-out “war against cancer.” The book reads like a literary thriller with cancer as the protagonist. From the Persian Queen Atossa, whose Greek slave may have cut off her diseased breast, to the nineteenth-century recipients of primitive radiation and chemotherapy to Mukherjee’s own leukemia patient, Carla, The Emperor of All Maladies is about the people who have soldiered through fiercely demanding regimens in order to survive—and to increase our understanding of this iconic disease. Riveting, urgent, and surprising, The Emperor of All Maladies provides a fascinating glimpse into the future of cancer treatments. It is an illuminating book that provides hope and clarity to those seeking to demystify cancer.

    Available Formats: Download

    The Emperor of All Maladies

    22.3 hrs • 12/15/15 • Unabridged
    0 reviews 0 5 5 5 out of 5 stars 5/5
    Download
  10. 5.1 hrs • 11/1/2015 • Unabridged

    When “metadata” became breaking news, appearing in stories about surveillance by the National Security Agency, many members of the public encountered this once-obscure term from information science for the first time. Should people be reassured that the NSA was “only” collecting metadata about phone calls—information about the caller, the recipient, the time, the duration, the location—and not recordings of the conversations themselves? Or does phone call metadata reveal more than it seems? In this book, Jeffrey Pomerantz offers an accessible and concise introduction to metadata. In the era of ubiquitous computing, metadata has become infrastructural, like the electrical grid or the highway system. We interact with it or generate it every day. It is not, Pomerantz tell us, just “data about data.” It is a means by which the complexity of an object is represented in a simpler form. For example, the title, the author, and the cover art are metadata about a book. When metadata does its job well, it fades into the background; everyone (except perhaps the NSA) takes it for granted. Pomerantz explains what metadata is, and why it exists. He distinguishes among different types of metadata—descriptive, administrative, structural, preservation, and use—and examines different users and uses of each type. He discusses the technologies that make modern metadata possible, and he speculates about metadata’s future. By the end of the book, listeners will see metadata everywhere. Because, Pomerantz warns us, it’s metadata’s world, and we are just living in it.

    Available Formats: Download

    Metadata

    5.1 hrs • 11/1/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  11. 13.2 hrs • 10/27/2015 • Unabridged

    The New York Times bestselling author of The Rational Optimist and Genome returns with a fascinating, brilliant argument for evolution that definitively dispels a dangerous, widespread myth: that we can command and control our world. The Evolution of Everything is about bottom-up order and its enemy, the top-down twitch—the endless fascination human beings have for design rather than evolution, for direction rather than emergence. Drawing on anecdotes from science, economics, history, politics and philosophy, Matt Ridley’s wide-ranging, highly opinionated opus demolishes conventional assumptions that major scientific and social imperatives are dictated by those on high, whether in government, business, academia, or morality. On the contrary, our most important achievements develop from the bottom up. Patterns emerge, trends evolve. Just as skeins of geese form Vs in the sky without meaning to, and termites build mud cathedrals without architects, so brains take shape without brain-makers, learning can happen without teaching and morality changes without a plan. Although we neglect, defy and ignore them, bottom-up trends shape the world. The growth of technology, the sanitation-driven health revolution, the quadrupling of farm yields so that more land can be released for nature—these were largely emergent phenomena, as were the Internet, the mobile phone revolution, and the rise of Asia. Ridley demolishes the arguments for design and effectively makes the case for evolution in the universe, morality, genes, the economy, culture, technology, the mind, personality, population, education, history, government, God, money, and the future. As compelling as it is controversial, authoritative as it is ambitious, Ridley’s stunning perspective will revolutionize the way we think about our world and how it works.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    The Evolution of Everything

    13.2 hrs • 10/27/15 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD
  12. 11.5 hrs • 10/26/2015 • Unabridged

    For over two millennia in the West, familiarity with the literature, philosophy, and values of the Classical World has been synonymous with education itself. The traditions of the Greeks explain why Western Culture’s unique tenets of democracy, capitalism, civil liberty, and constitutional government are now sweeping the globe. Yet the general public in America knows less about its cultural origins than ever before, as Classical education rapidly disappears from our high school and university curricula. Acclaimed classicists Hanson and Heath raise an impassioned call to arms: if we lose our knowledge of the Greeks, we lose our understanding of who we are. With straightforward advice and informative reading lists, the authors present a highly useful primer for anyone who wants more knowledge of Classics, and thus of the beauty and perils of our own culture.

    Available Formats: Download

    Who Killed Homer?

    11.5 hrs • 10/26/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  13. 9.0 hrs • 10/13/2015 • Unabridged

    In Drinking in America, bestselling author Susan Cheever chronicles our national love affair with liquor, taking a long, thoughtful look at the way alcohol has changed our nation’s history. This is the often-overlooked story of how alcohol has shaped American events and the American character from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Seen through the lens of alcoholism, American history takes on a vibrancy and a tragedy missing from many earlier accounts. From the drunkenness of the Pilgrims to Prohibition hijinks, drinking has always been a cherished American custom: a way to celebrate and a way to grieve and a way to take the edge off. At many pivotal points in our history—the illegal Mayflower landing at Cape Cod, the enslavement of African Americans, the McCarthy witch hunts, and the Kennedy assassination, to name only a few—alcohol has acted as a catalyst. Some nations drink more than we do, some drink less, but no other nation has been the drunkest in the world as America was in the 1830s only to outlaw drinking entirely a hundred years later. Both a lively history and an unflinching cultural investigation, Drinking in America unveils the volatile ambivalence within one nation’s tumultuous affair with alcohol.

    Available Formats: Download

    Drinking in America

    9.0 hrs • 10/13/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  14. 9.9 hrs • 9/29/2015 • Unabridged

    What does it mean to devote yourself wholly to helping others? In Strangers Drowning, Larissa MacFarquhar seeks out people living lives of extreme ethical commitment and tells their deeply intimate stories: their stubborn integrity and their compromises; their bravery and their recklessness; their joys and defeats and wrenching dilemmas. A couple adopts two children in distress. But then they think: If they can change two lives, why not four? Or ten? They adopt twenty. But how do they weigh the needs of unknown children in distress against the needs of the children they already have? Another couple founds a leprosy colony in the wilderness in India, living in huts with no walls, knowing that their two small children may contract leprosy or be eaten by panthers. The children survive. But what if they hadn’t? How would their parents’ risk have been judged? A woman believes that if she spends money on herself, rather than donate it to buy lifesaving medicine, then she’s responsible for the deaths that result. She lives on a fraction of her income, but wonders: When is compromise self-indulgence and when is it essential? We honor such generosity and high ideals; but when we call people do-gooders there is skepticism in it, even hostility. Why do moral people make us uneasy? Between her stories, MacFarquhar threads a lively history of the literature, philosophy, social science, and self-help that have contributed to a deep suspicion of do-gooders in Western culture. Through its sympathetic and beautifully vivid storytelling, Strangers Drowning confronts us with fundamental questions about what it means to be human. In a world of strangers drowning in need, how much should we help, and how much can we help? Is it right to care for strangers even at the expense of those we are closest to? Moving and provocative, Strangers Drowning challenges us to think about what we value most, and why.

    Available Formats: Download

    Strangers Drowning

    9.9 hrs • 9/29/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  15. 10.4 hrs • 9/15/2015 • Unabridged

    New York Times bestselling author and founder of Media Matters, David Brock takes readers on his daring and eye-opening odyssey through the maze of political trenches. David Brock is the ultimate happy warrior. Once a leading right-wing hit man, Brock is now the Left’s pre-eminent defender and truth teller. In this incisive, personal account, Brock disarms the major tentacles of the Republican Leviathan: the Koch Brothers, the Clinton haters, and the Fox Noise Machine. With the acumen of a seasoned political player, Brock takes readers inside his Democratic war rooms and their 24/7 battles with right-wing forces for control of the story lines and messages that will decide the 2016 election. And he chronicles his own evolution from lead Clinton attack-dog to one of Hillary Clinton’s fiercest defenders as he knocks down the conservative case against her. Finally, Killing the Messenger provides the no holds barred playbook for what the new right-wing conspirators will do in this election cycle to tear apart the electorate—and what good, engaged, and informed citizens can do to stop them.

    Available Formats: Download

    Killing the Messenger

    10.4 hrs • 9/15/15 • Unabridged
    Download
  16. 13.2 hrs • 6/23/2015 • Unabridged

    America’s #1 conspiracy theorist and New York Times bestselling author Jim Marrs explores how the GOD syndicate—a global monopoly of guns, oil, and drugs—is consciously destroying American values and offers prescriptive solutions to fix our nation. According to the Declaration of Independence, “all men are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” But America today has failed to live up to the Founding Fathers’ ideals. In 2014 there were three million homeless people in the United States and almost twenty million vacant homes. The most technologically advanced nation in the world has a life expectancy lower than that of Chile and Bahrain. And citizens of the wealthiest country on the planet continue to ingest toxic chemicals through their food, their vaccines, and even their water. America, Jim Marrs argues, has been seized by a culture of death. And who promulgates this culture? The globalist masters of the GOD Syndicate—guns, oil, and drugs. Pushed to the brink by this lethal triumvirate, Americans increasingly find themselves headed toward an inexorable decline ending in servitude and premature death. In Population Control, Marrs takes aim at our deteriorating nation and offers practical steps we can take to save it. As he exposes how daily living—from the food we eat to the water we drink to the drugs we ingest—pushes us closer to an early grave, he shows us how a return to true prosperity is possible and explains what we need to do to fight back and save our lives and our nation’s soul.

    Available Formats: Download, CD

    Population Control

    13.2 hrs • 6/23/15 • Unabridged
    Download
    Also: CD
Loading more titles...
See More Titles Loading More Titles ... Back To Top
Digital Audiobooks With Zero Restrictions