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Southeast

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  1. 3.5 hrs • 8/30/2016 • Unabridged

    Culture Smart! provides essential information on attitudes, beliefs and behavior in the Philippines, ensuring that you arrive aware of basic manners, common courtesies, and sensitive issues. This concise guides tell you what to expect, how to behave, and how to establish a rapport with your hosts. The inside knowledge will enable you to steer clear of embarrassing gaffes and mistakes, feel confident in unfamiliar situations, and develop trust, friendships, and successful business relationships. It will help you to turn your visit-whether on business or for pleasure-into a memorable and enriching experience.

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    Philippines—Culture Smart!

    3.5 hrs • 8/30/16 • Unabridged
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  2. 3.7 hrs • 1/26/2016
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    Also: Digital Rental
  3. 7.8 hrs • 7/15/2012 • Unabridged

    More than fifteen years since its original publication, the #1 New York Times bestseller We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young is still required reading in all branches of the military. Now Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway revisit their relationships with ten American veterans of the battle, as well as Lt. Gen. Nguyen Hu An, who commanded the North Vietnamese Army troops on the other side, and two of his old company commanders. Moore and Galloway mix gritty and vivid detail with reverence and respect for their comrades. Their ability to capture man's sense of heroism and brotherhood, their love for their men and their former enemies, and their fascination with the history of this enigmatic country make for riveting listening. We Are Soldiers Still puts a human face on warfare in a way that will not soon be forgotten.

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    We Are Soldiers Still

    7.8 hrs • 7/15/12 • Unabridged
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  4. 8.3 hrs • 6/7/2010 • Unabridged

    Over the years the American writer Emma Larkin has spent traveling in Burma, she has come to know all too well the many ways this police state can be described as “Orwellian.” The life of the mind exists in a state of siege in Burma, and it long has. The connection between George Orwell and Burma is not simply metaphorical, of course; Orwell’s mother was born in Burma, and he was shaped by his experiences there as a young man working for the British Imperial Police. Both his first novel, Burmese Days, and the novel he left unfinished upon his death were set in Burma. And then there is the place of Orwell’s work in Burma today: Larkin found it a commonplace observation in Burma that Orwell did not write one book about the country but three—the other two being Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. When Larkin quietly asked one Burmeseman if he knew the work of George Orwell, he stared blankly for a moment and then said, “Ah, you mean the prophet.” Finding George Orwell in Burma is the story of the year Larkin spent traveling across this shuttered police state using the life and work of Orwell as her guide. Traveling from Mandalay and Rangoon to poor delta backwaters and up to the old hill-station towns in the mountains of Burma’s far north, Larkin visits the places Orwell worked and lived and the places his books live still. She brings to vivid life a country and a people cut off from the rest of the world, and from one another, by the ruling military junta and its network of spies and informers. Orwell’s spoor leads Larkin to strange, ghostly traces of the British colonial presence and to people who have found ways to bolster their minds against the state’s all-pervasive propaganda. Orwell’s moral clarity, hatred of injustice, and observant gaze serve as the author’s compass in a less tangible sense too: they are qualities that also suffuse this, her own powerful reckoning with one of the world’s least free countries.

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    Finding George Orwell in Burma

    8.3 hrs • 6/7/10 • Unabridged
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  5. 16.7 hrs • 3/6/2007 • Unabridged

    The Father of All Things is a riveting, haunting, and often hilarious account of a veteran and his son’s journey through Vietnam. As his father recounts his experiences as a soldier, including a near fatal injury, Tom Bissell weaves a larger history of the war and explores the controversies that still spark furious debate today. Blending history, memoir, and travelogue, The Father of All Things is a portrait of the war’s personal, political, and cultural impact from the perspective of the generation that grew up in the wake of the conflict. It is also a wise and revelatory book about the bond between fathers and sons.

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    The Father of All Things

    16.7 hrs • 3/6/07 • Unabridged
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  6. 8.7 hrs • 12/1/2000 • Unabridged

    When Christopher Hunt set off in search of Vietnam’s notorious Ho Chi Minh Trail, he hardly expected to end up on a rickety, Russian-made motorcycle navigating 5,000 kilometers of paths rarely traveled by tourists and on roads missing from maps. Hunt left the United States expecting to explore the 1,700-kilometer highway that was once the supply route for the North Vietnamese Army. He soon found himself roaming the Vietnamese countryside in need of help and direction. In the process, he found that being an American in Vietnam conjured constant reminders of the past and encountered a country and a people poised precariously between the ancient and the modern. With adventure, wit, and an eye for the absurd, Hunt goes beyond the newspaper headlines and myths about Vietnam to capture the color and complexity of Vietnam today.

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    Sparring with Charlie by Christopher Hunt

    Sparring with Charlie

    8.7 hrs • 12/1/00 • Unabridged
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  7. 5.7 hrs • 9/12/2000 • Abridged

    The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-la is a breathtaking account of the ill-fated October 1998 expedition of an American whitewater kayaking team who traveled deep into the Tsangpo Gorge in Tibet to run the Yarlung Tsangpo, known in paddling circles as the “Everest of rivers.” For Wick Walker and Tom McEwan, extreme whitewater pioneers, best friends, and trip leaders, the Tsangpo adventure was the culmination of a twenty-five-year quest for glory. Yet the team’s magnificent dreams crumbled when their ace paddler was swept over a thunderous eight-foot waterfall, never to be seen again. Here is a fascinating exploration of both the seething big water and perilous terrain of the legendary Shangri-la, and the men who dared challenge the furious rapids that raced through this 140-mile-long canyon. The Last River invites us to view the Himalayas from a totally new perspective—on a historic river so remote that only the most hardy and romantic souls attempt to unlock its mysteries.

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    The Last River

    5.7 hrs • 9/12/00 • Abridged
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