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  1. 14.8 hrs • Mar/21/2017 • Unabridged

    New York Times bestselling author Ron Powers offers a searching, richly researched narrative of the social history of mental illness in America paired with the deeply personal story of his two sons’ battles with schizophrenia.From the centuries of torture of “lunatiks” at Bedlam Asylum to the infamous eugenics era to the follies of the anti-psychiatry movement to the current landscape in which too many families struggle alone to manage afflicted love ones, Powers limns our fears and myths about mental illness and the fractured public policies that have resulted. Braided with that history is the moving story of Powers’ beloved son Kevin—spirited, endearing, and gifted—who triumphed even while suffering from schizophrenia until finally he did not, and the story of his courageous surviving son Dean, who is also schizophrenic.A blend of history, biography, memoir, and current affairs ending with a consideration of where we might go from here, this is a thought-provoking look at a dreaded illness that has long been misunderstood.

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    No One Cares about Crazy People

    Read by Ron Powers
    14.8 hrs • Mar/21/2017 • Unabridged
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  2. 5.5 hrs • Jan/17/2017 • Unabridged

    Our “thirty-is-the-new-twenty” culture tells us the twentysomething years don’t matter. Some say they are a second adolescence. Others call them an emerging adulthood. Dr. Meg Jay, a clinical psychologist, argues that twentysomethings have been caught in a swirl of hype and misinformation, much of which has trivialized what is actually the most defining decade of adulthood.Drawing from a decade of work with hundreds of twentysomething clients and students, The Defining Decade weaves the latest science of the twentysomething years with behind-closed-doors stories from twentysomethings themselves. The result is a provocative read that provides the tools necessary to make the most of your twenties, and shows us how work, relationships, personality, social networks, identity, and even the brain can change more during this decade than at any other time in adulthood—if we use the time wisely.

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    The Defining Decade

    Read by Meg Jay, PhD
    5.5 hrs • Jan/17/2017 • Unabridged
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  3. 4.0 hrs • Dec/13/2016 • Unabridged

    They’re among us, but they are not like us. They manipulate, lie, cheat, and steal. They are irresistibly charming and accomplished, appearing to live in a radiance beyond what we are capable of. But narcissists are empty. No one knows exactly what everyone else is full of—some kind of a soul, or personhood—but whatever it is, experts agree that narcissists do not have it.So goes the popular understanding of narcissism, or NPD (narcissistic personality disorder). And it’s more prevalent than ever, according to recent articles in the New York Times, the Atlantic, and Time. In bestsellers like The Narcissism Epidemic, Narcissists Exposed, and The Narcissist Next Door, pop psychologists have armed the normal with tools to identify and combat the vampiric influence of this rising population, while on websites like NarcissismSurvivor.com, thousands of people congregate to swap horror stories about relationships with “narcs.”In The Selfishness of Others, the essayist Kristin Dombek provides a clear-sighted account of how a rare clinical diagnosis became a fluid cultural phenomenon, a repository for our deepest fears about love, friendship, and family. She cuts through hysteria in search of the razor-thin line between pathology and common selfishness, writing with robust skepticism toward the prophets of NPD and genuine empathy for those who see themselves as its victims. And finally, she shares her own story in a candid effort to find a path away from the cycle of fear and blame and toward a more forgiving and rewarding life.

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    The Selfishness of Others

    4.0 hrs • Dec/13/2016 • Unabridged
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  4. 10.8 hrs • Dec/06/2016 • Unabridged

    The twentieth anniversary edition of the definitive classic on defeating obsessive-compulsive behavior, with all-new material from the authorAn estimated five million Americans suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and live diminished lives in which they are compelled to obsess about something or to repeat a similar task over and over. Traditionally, OCD has been treated with Prozac or similar drugs. The problem with medication, aside from its cost, is that thirty percent of people treated don’t respond to it, and when the pills stop, the symptoms invariably return.In Brain Lock, Jeffrey M. Schwartz, MD, presents a simple four-step method for overcoming OCD that is so effective, it’s now used in academic treatment centers throughout the world. Proven by brain-imaging tests to actually alter the brain’s chemistry, this method doesn’t rely on psychopharmaceuticals. Instead, patients use cognitive self-therapy and behavior modification to develop new patterns of response to their obsessions. In essence, they use the mind to fix the brain.Using the real-life stories of actual patients, Brain Lock explains this revolutionary method and provides readers with the inspiration and tools to free themselves from their psychic prisons and regain control of their lives.

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  5. 7.5 hrs • Dec/06/2016 • Unabridged

    A controversial call to arms, Against Empathy argues that the natural impulse to share the feelings of others can lead to immoral choices in both public policy and in our intimate relationships with friends and family.Most people, including many policy-makers, activists, scientists, and philosophers, have encouraged us to be more empathetic—to feel the pain and pleasure of others. Yale researcher and author Paul Bloom argues that this is a mistake. Far from leading us to improve the lives of others, empathy is a capricious and irrational emotion that appeals to our narrow prejudices. It muddles our judgment and often leads to cruelty. We are at our best when we are smart enough not to rely on it, and draw upon a more distanced compassion. Based on groundbreaking scientific findings, Against Empathy makes the case that some of the worst decisions that individuals and nations make—from who to give money to, when to go to war, how to respond to climate change, and who to put in prison—are too often motivated by honest, yet misplaced, emotions. With clear and witty prose, Bloom demonstrates how empathy distorts our judgment in every aspect of our lives, from philanthropy and charity to the justice system; from culture and education to foreign policy and war. Without empathy, Bloom insists, our decisions would be clearer, fairer, and ultimately more moral.Bound to be controversial, Against Empathy shows us that, when it comes to major policy decisions and the choices we make in our everyday lives, limiting our empathetic emotions is often the most compassionate choice we can make.

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    Against Empathy

    Read by Karen Cass
    7.5 hrs • Dec/06/2016 • Unabridged
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  6. 10.1 hrs • Nov/01/2016 • Unabridged

    From Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist David Wood, a battlefield view of moral injury, the signature wound of America’s modern wars.Most Americans are now familiar with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among troops. In this groundbreaking new book, David Wood examines the far more pervasive yet less understood experience of those we send to war: moral injury, the violation of our fundamental values of right and wrong that so often occurs in the impossible moral dilemmas of modern conflict. Featuring portraits of combat veterans and leading mental health researchers, along with Wood’s personal observations of war and the young Americans deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, What Have We Done offers an unflinching look at war and those who volunteer for it—the thrill and pride of service and, too often, the scars of moral injury.Impeccably researched and deeply personal, What Have We Done is a compassionate, finely drawn study of modern war and those caught up in it. It is a call to acknowledge our newest generation of veterans by listening intently to them and absorbing their stories; and, as new wars approach, to ponder the inevitable human costs of putting American boots on the ground.

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    What Have We Done

    10.1 hrs • Nov/01/2016 • Unabridged
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  7. 7.6 hrs • Sep/13/2016 • Unabridged

    Combining leading theories of psychology and behavior with case studies and practical advice, National Geographic’s Mind explores the question we all enjoy asking: Who am I? A companion to National Geographic’s Body and Brain, this reference explores today’s theories of personality, mixing scientific theory with an underlying message: by knowing more about your own psychology, you can have a better life.Chapters start with the anatomy, evolution, and development of the human brain, then move into such areas as intuition, creativity, motivation, faith, and ethics—all facets of a unique personality. Interesting scenarios of mental health and mental deviance make for a lively, readable narrative that combines today’s leading theories in the science of the mind and personality with life-enhancing questions, quizzes, practices, and tools for self-discovery.An entertaining book about science, Mind connects with the listener in a very personal and ultimately helpful way.

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    Mind

    Read by Andrew Reilly
    7.6 hrs • Sep/13/2016 • Unabridged
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  8. 6.8 hrs • Aug/09/2016 • Unabridged

    A useful guide to detecting deception from an expert military interrogatorLena wrote You’re Lying! because no matter what your profession or life circumstances, you need the skills to take control of a situation, detect deception, and reveal the truth. While you probably won’t ever have to interrogate a detainee who doesn’t want to tell you about an upcoming terrorist attack—as Lena has—You’re Lying! will help you deal with that salesperson trying to rip you off, the kid bullying your child who claims innocence, a cheating spouse, or dissembling boss. As the adage says, knowledge is power.Lena interrogated numerous members of al-Qaeda and the Taliban while stationed at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, then taught those skills to Defense Department personnel for years afterward. Her ability to build rapport, accurately read body language, and employ effective questioning techniques led to numerous successes that saved American lives.You will also learn her easy-to-follow five-step program on how to accurately detect verbal (both spoken and written) and nonverbal deceptive tells, how to conduct an effective line of questioning, and what to do after you identify the lies we all face every day.Take the knowledge in You’re Lying! and empower yourself—don’t get fooled again.

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    You’re Lying!

    6.8 hrs • Aug/09/2016 • Unabridged
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  9. 9.6 hrs • Apr/12/2016 • Unabridged

    In this revolutionary and provocative exploration of the history, biology, treatment, and shared experience of mental anguish, the New York Times bestselling author and former FDA Commissioner examines how and why we become the agents of our own suffering and what we can do to change it. His unified theory of the mind—which he terms “capture”—will transform how we understand the unwanted thoughts that trouble all of us.Dr. David A. Kessler has spent the past two decades studying how addictive substances can influence our thoughts and behavior. In Capture, he considers some of the most profound questions we face as human beings: Why do we think and act in ways that are detrimental to our wellbeing? What is the origin of emotional anguish, from everyday unhappiness to mental illness? Is it possible that addiction, depression, anxiety, obsession, bipolar disorder, and even psychosis are somehow manifestations of the same biological mechanism?Informed by the latest research in psychology and neuroscience, Dr. Kessler examines how our minds become “captured,” or taken hostage by a physiological process that feels beyond our control. He explores how the phenomenon of capture has been portrayed in literature, philosophy, religion, and art, from Aristotle’s belief in the triumph of human virtue to William James’ concept of selective attention. Dr. Kessler’s theory is brilliantly and compellingly portrayed with stories from a diverse range of afflicted lives: ordinary people, prominent writers such as David Foster Wallace, Franz Kafka, and Anne Sexton, and criminals like Sirhan Sirhan and Ted Kaczynski. On the other side of the spectrum, Dr. Kessler also examines where the mechanism of capture offers the potential for psychological benefit, and may be responsible for experiences of positive change or transcendence.The closer we can come to fully comprehending the nature of capture, Dr. Kessler argues, the better chance we have to alleviate its deleterious effects. Ultimately, Capture offers a unified field theory of the human mind, providing insight into the ways in which experience, memory, emotion, thought, and behavior are inextricably linked, and how we might begin to unwind the processes of the human mind to create meaning and, ultimately, freedom.

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    Capture

    Read by Lloyd James
    9.6 hrs • Apr/12/2016 • Unabridged
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  10. 3.5 hrs • Apr/05/2016 • Unabridged

    How did the human mind emerge from the collection of neurons that makes up the brain? How did the brain acquire self-awareness, functional autonomy, language, and the ability to think, to understand itself and the world? In this volume in MIT’s Essential Knowledge series, Zoltan Torey offers an accessible and concise description of the evolutionary breakthrough that created the human mind. Drawing on insights from evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and linguistics, Torey reconstructs the sequence of events by which Homo erectus became Homo sapiens. He describes the augmented functioning that underpins the emergent mind—a new (“off-line”) internal response system with which the brain accesses itself and then forms a selection mechanism for mentally generated behavior options. This functional breakthrough, Torey argues, explains how the animal brain’s “awareness” became self-accessible and reflective—that is, how the human brain acquired a conscious mind. Consciousness, unlike animal awareness, is not a unitary phenomenon but a composite process. Torey’s account shows how protolanguage evolved into language, how a brain subsystem for the emergent mind was built, and why these developments are opaque to introspection. We experience the brain’s functional autonomy, he argues, as free will. Torey proposes that once life began, consciousness had to emerge—because consciousness is the informational source of the brain’s behavioral response. Consciousness, he argues, is not a newly acquired “quality,” “cosmic principle,” “circuitry arrangement,” or “epiphenomenon,” as others have argued, but an indispensable working component of the living system’s manner of functioning.

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    The Conscious Mind

    Read by Don Hagen
    3.5 hrs • Apr/05/2016 • Unabridged
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  11. 10.3 hrs • Mar/15/2016 • Unabridged

    A groundbreaking, science-based, and holistic approach to treating depression—not as a disease, but as a systemic imbalance—that will rescue millions of women currently taking pharmaceuticals or considering it.Last year alone thirty million Americans were prescribed $12 billion of antidepressants—SSRI’s are steadily becoming a traditional medicine panacea for depression, anxiety, panic attacks. Patients—overwhelmingly female—are looking for solutions, but according to Dr. Kelly Brogan, the help these women want can’t be found at the pharmacy. Antidepressants are not only the wrong way to treat depression, but their long-term use can permanently dismantle the body’s self-healing mechanisms. We need a new paradigm: The best way to heal the brain is to heal the body.Based on her expert interpretation of published medical findings combined with years of evidence from helping her own patients, Dr. Brogan illuminates the real cause of depression: it is not a simple neurochemical disorder but rather a complex inflammatory disease—a manifestation of irregularities in the body that start far away from neural synapses and serotonin. In A Mind of Your Own, she demolishes the myths traditional medicine has built around the causes and treatment of depression, and offers a proscriptive, step-by-step thirty-day action plan—including dietary modifications, over-the-counter supplements, detoxification, sleep, and stress reduction techniques—women can use to heal their bodies, eradicate inflammation, and feel like themselves again.Bold, brave, and revolutionary, A Mind of Your Own challenges readers to question their assumptions and regain control of their own well-being—and on their own terms.

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  12. 9.9 hrs • Jan/05/2016 • Unabridged

    Psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom probes further into the mysteries of the therapeutic encounter in this entertaining and thoughtful follow-up to his bestselling Love’s Executioner In six enthralling stories drawn from his own clinical experience, Irvin D. Yalom once again proves himself an intrepid explorer of the human psyche as he guides his patients—and himself—toward transformation. With eloquent detail and sharp-eyed observation, Yalom introduces us to a memorable cast of characters. Drifting through his dreams and trampling through his thoughts are Paula, Yalom’s “courtesan of death”; Myrna, whose eavesdropping gives new meaning to patient confidentiality; Magnolia, into whose ample lap Yalom longs to pour his own sorrows, even as he strives to ease hers; and Momma—ill-tempered, overpowering, and suffocating her son with both love and disapproval. A richly rewarding, almost illicit glimpse into the therapist’s heart and mind, Momma and the Meaning of Life illuminates the unique potential of every human relationship.

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    Momma and the Meaning of Life

    Read by Traber Burns
    9.9 hrs • Jan/05/2016 • Unabridged
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  13. 5.8 hrs • Dec/29/2015 • Unabridged

    In The Collapse of Parenting, Leonard Sax, an acclaimed expert on parenting and childhood development, identifies a key problem plaguing American children, especially relative to other countries: the dramatic decline in young people’s achievement and psychological health. The root of this problem, Sax contends, lies in the transfer of authority from parents to their children, a shift that has been occurring over the last fifty years and is now impossible to ignore. Sax pinpoints the effects of this shift, arguing that the rising levels of obesity, depression, and anxiety among young people—as well as their parents’ widespread dependence on psychiatric medications to fix such problems—can all be traced back to a corresponding decline in adult authority.Sax argues that a general decline in respect for elders has had particularly severe consequences for the relationship between parents and their children. The result is parents are afraid of seeming too dictatorial and end up abdicating their authority entirely rather than taking a stand with their own children. If kids refuse to eat anything green and demand pizza instead, parents give in, inadvertently raising children who expect to eat sweets and junk food and are thus more likely to become obese. If children demand and receive the latest smartphones, tablets, and other gadgets, and are then allowed to spend the bulk of their waking hours texting with friends and accessing any website they want, they become increasingly reliant on peers and the media for guidance on how to live, rather than their parents. And if they won’t sit still in class or listen to adults—parents or teachers—they’re often prescribed medication, a quick fix that doesn’t help them learn self-control. In short, according to Sax, parents have failed to teach their children good habits, leaving children with no clear sense of the distinction between right and wrong. But Sax insists there is hope. To start with, parents need to regain a central place in the lives of their young children, displacing same-age peers who can’t provide the same kind of guidance and stability. Parents also need to learn that they can’t be a best friend and a parent at the same time. They’ll make their children’s lives easier if they focus not on pleasing their kids, but instead on giving them the tools they need to lead happy, healthy lives.Drawing on over twenty-five years of experience as a family psychologist and hundreds of interviews with children, parents, and teachers in the United States and throughout the world, Sax makes a convincing case that if we are to help our children avoid the pitfalls of an increasingly complicated world, we must reassert authority as parents.

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    The Collapse of Parenting

    5.8 hrs • Dec/29/2015 • Unabridged
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  14. 15.6 hrs • Oct/06/2015 • Unabridged

    Creativity is about capturing the moments that make life worth living. Legendary psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi reveals what leads to these moments—be it the excitement of the artist at the easel or the scientist in the lab—so that this knowledge can be used to enrich people’s lives.Drawing on nearly one hundred interviews with exceptional people—from biologists and physicists to politicians and business leaders to poets and artists—as well as his thirty years of research on the subject, Csikszentmihalyi uses his famous flow theory to explore the creative process. He discusses such ideas as why creative individuals are often seen as selfish and arrogant and why the “tortured genius” is largely a myth. Most importantly, he explains why creativity needs to be cultivated and is necessary for the future of our country, if not the world.

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    Creativity

    Read by Lloyd James
    15.6 hrs • Oct/06/2015 • Unabridged
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  15. 18.8 hrs • Aug/25/2015 • Unabridged

    What is autism: a lifelong disability or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is both of these things and more—and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. Wired reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.Going back to the earliest days of autism research and chronicling the brave and lonely journey of autistic people and their families through the decades, Silberman provides long-sought solutions to the autism puzzle, while mapping out a path for our society toward a more humane world in which people with learning differences and those who love them have access to the resources they need to live happier, healthier, more secure, and more meaningful lives.Along the way, he reveals the untold story of Hans Asperger, the father of Asperger’s syndrome, whose “little professors” were targeted by the darkest social-engineering experiment in human history; exposes the covert campaign by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner to suppress knowledge of the autism spectrum for fifty years; and casts light on the growing movement of “neurodiversity” activists seeking respect, support, technological innovation, accommodations in the workplace and in education, and the right to self-determination for those with cognitive differences.

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    NeuroTribes

    Read by William Hughes
    18.8 hrs • Aug/25/2015 • Unabridged
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  16. 6.1 hrs • Jul/07/2015 • Unabridged

    Harvard Medical School psychologist and Huffington Post blogger Craig Malkin addresses the “narcissism epidemic” by illuminating the spectrum of narcissism, ways to control the trait, and explaining how too little of it may be a bad thing.“What is narcissism?” is one of the fastest rising searches on Google, and articles on the topic routinely go viral. Yet narcissist seems to mean something different every time it’s uttered. People hurl the word as insult at anyone who offends them. It’s become so ubiquitous, in fact, that it’s lost any clear meaning. The only certainty these days is that it’s bad to be a narcissist—really bad—inspiring the same kind of roiling queasiness we feel when we hear the words sexist or racist. That’s especially troubling news for millennials, the people born after 1980, who’ve been branded the “most narcissistic generation ever.”In Rethinking Narcissism listeners will learn that there’s far more to narcissism than its reductive invective would imply. The truth is that narcissists (all of us) fall on a spectrum somewhere between utter selflessness on the one side and arrogance and grandiosity on the other. A healthy middle exhibits a strong sense of self. On the far end lies sociopathy. Malkin deconstructs the healthy from the unhealthy narcissism and offers clear, step-by-step guidance on how to promote healthy narcissism in our partners, our children, and ourselves.

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    Rethinking Narcissism

    6.1 hrs • Jul/07/2015 • Unabridged
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