67 Shots by Howard  Means audiobook

67 Shots: Kent State and the End of American Innocence

By Howard Means
Read by Alan Sklar

Blackstone Publishing 9780306823794
9.98 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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At midday on May 4, 1970, after three days of protests, several thousand students and the Ohio National Guard faced off at opposite ends of the grassy campus commons at Kent State University. At noon, the Guard moved out. Twenty-four minutes later, Guardsmen launched a thirteen-second, sixty-seven-shot barrage that left four students dead and nine wounded, one paralyzed for life. The story doesn’t end there, though. A horror of far greater proportions was narrowly averted minutes later when the Guard and students reassembled on the commons. The Kent State shootings were both unavoidable and preventable: unavoidable in that all the discordant forces of a turbulent decade flowed together on May 4, 1970, on one Ohio campus; preventable in that every party to the tragedy made the wrong choices at the wrong time in the wrong place. Using the university’s recently available oral-history collection supplemented by extensive new interviewing, Means tells the story of this iconic American moment through the eyes and memories of those who were there, and skillfully situates it in the context of a tumultuous era.

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Summary

Summary

At midday on May 4, 1970, after three days of protests, several thousand students and the Ohio National Guard faced off at opposite ends of the grassy campus commons at Kent State University. At noon, the Guard moved out. Twenty-four minutes later, Guardsmen launched a thirteen-second, sixty-seven-shot barrage that left four students dead and nine wounded, one paralyzed for life. The story doesn’t end there, though. A horror of far greater proportions was narrowly averted minutes later when the Guard and students reassembled on the commons.

The Kent State shootings were both unavoidable and preventable: unavoidable in that all the discordant forces of a turbulent decade flowed together on May 4, 1970, on one Ohio campus; preventable in that every party to the tragedy made the wrong choices at the wrong time in the wrong place.

Using the university’s recently available oral-history collection supplemented by extensive new interviewing, Means tells the story of this iconic American moment through the eyes and memories of those who were there, and skillfully situates it in the context of a tumultuous era.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“In Howard Means’ fine hands, we discern how the terrible events at Kent State unfolded—relentlessly, ineluctably.” Hampton Sides, New York Times bestselling author
“Excellent reporting…[Means] goes deep into the record.” Washington Post
“An exhaustive and excellent book of reporting and analysis.” VVA Veteran
“Means’ look at a horrible moment in US history is crucial to understanding the law, politics, basic rights and how occasionally all three clash and how the former fail the latter.” San Francisco Book Review
“A fresh look at an era-defining US tragedy.” Washington Independent Review of Books
“This isn’t history writing at a distance. Means interviewed many of the players, major and minor, in this tragedy. Their personal stories give 67 Shots a deeply human feel and turn it into one of the most heartbreaking books in memory.” Christian Science Monitor
“Means…shows how the Vietnam War affected everything about our own sense of ourselves.” Providence Journal
“A solid account of a watershed moment in history. The inclusion of the remembrances of those involved that day lends a personal voice to our understanding of the shootings and the aftermath.” Library Journal
“This balanced account does justice to the perspectives of students, National Guardsmen, campus administrators, and local residents alike.” Kenneth Hammond, Kent State student-protest leader (1970)
“Narrator Alan Sklar uses his deep voice to lend gravitas to an emotional story…provides a warning for us in our anxiety-ridden age to be vigilant and to think before we act on the public stage.” AudioFile

Reviews

Reviews

by Odin 5/11/2017
Overall Performance
Story
Narration

Engaging and informative

The announcement in 1970 by Nixon to send troops into Cambodia in order to sever the passage of supplies and weapons to the Viet Cong was thought to be a good thing. However, the students of Kent State saw it differently and began protesting on May 4th. Starting off in the traditional sense at first, it escalated resulting in the burning down of the campus ROTC building. Ohio’s governor called in the National Guard and effectively put the campus under a military takeover. The book points out it didn’t take long for the stone and brick throwing, bags of human waste, and generally an absence of backing down on the part of the students to make the military feel threatened. Thus the 67 Shots that killed 4 students and wounded 9, including a bullet injury that left one student paralyzed for life. Howard Means wrote an engaging book and Alan Sklar rendered a noteworthy reading, maintaining a journalistic focus on detail without sacrificing the fears that were generated for both the National Guard and students. A fine listen for anyone interested in this piece of history that brought the world to their feet in astonishment.
-Odin-

Author

Author Bio: Howard Means

Author Bio: Howard  Means

Howard Means is the author or coauthor of many books, including the first biography of Colin Powell and Louis Freeh’s bestselling memoir My FBI. He has collaborated on dozens of titles, including bestsellers by Robert Baer (See No Evil, Sleeping with the Devil), George Tenet (At the Center of the Storm), and David Wessel (In Fed We Trust, Red Ink). A former syndicated columnist, Means was senior editor at Washingtonian magazine from 1989–2000. He lives in rural Virginia.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 9.98
Audience: Adult
Language: English