American Sherlock by Kate Winkler Dawson audiobook

American Sherlock: Murder, Forensics, and the Birth of American CSI

By Kate Winkler Dawson
Read by Kate Winkler Dawson

Penguin Audio 9780525539551
10.73 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9780593163801

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From the acclaimed author of Death in the Air ("Not since Devil in the White City has a book told such a harrowing tale"--Douglas Preston) comes the riveting story of the birth of criminal investigation in the twentieth century. Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with curiosities--beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books--sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the "American Sherlock Holmes," Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America's greatest--and first--forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural. Heinrich was one of the nation's first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. His work, though not without its serious--some would say fatal--flaws, changed the course of American criminal investigation. Based on years of research and thousands of never-before-published primary source materials, American Sherlock captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon--as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them.

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Summary

Summary

Nominated for the Reading the West Book Award

An Amazon Editor’s Top Pick

A Washington Post Pick of the Month

A Crime Reads Pick of Most Anticipated Books of 2020

A Kirkus Reviews Pick

From the acclaimed author of Death in the Air ("Not since Devil in the White City has a book told such a harrowing tale"--Douglas Preston) comes the riveting story of the birth of criminal investigation in the twentieth century. Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with curiosities--beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books--sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the "American Sherlock Holmes," Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America's greatest--and first--forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural. Heinrich was one of the nation's first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. His work, though not without its serious--some would say fatal--flaws, changed the course of American criminal investigation. Based on years of research and thousands of never-before-published primary source materials, American Sherlock captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon--as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Those interested in the development of modern forensics will be enthralled.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“Part institutional history, part true crime account, and part dramatic tale of brilliant minds and clashing personalities.” Crime Reads
“Anyone fascinated by the myriad detective series and television shows about forensics will want to read it.” Washington Post
“The book delivers on its promise of gruesome murders, huge manhunts and the pleasures of clue gathering.” San Francisco Chronicle

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Kate Winkler Dawson

Author Bio: Kate Winkler Dawson

Kate Winkler Dawson is a seasoned documentary producer, whose work has appeared in the New York Times, WCBS News and ABC News Radio, Fox News Channel, United Press International, PBS NewsHour, and Nightline. She teaches journalism at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/True Crime
Runtime: 10.73
Audience: Adult
Language: English