Blood at the Root by Patrick Phillips audiobook

Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America

By Patrick Phillips
Read by Patrick Phillips

Random House Audio
7.15 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781524722500

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A gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America. Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. Many black residents were poor sharecroppers, but others owned their own farms and the land on which they’d founded the county’s thriving black churches. But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. In the wake of the expulsions, whites harvested the crops and took over the livestock of their former neighbors, and quietly laid claim to “abandoned” land. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten. National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s. Blood at the Root is a sweeping American tale that spans the Cherokee removals of the 1830s, the hope and promise of Reconstruction, and the crushing injustice of Forsyth’s racial cleansing. With bold storytelling and lyrical prose, Phillips breaks a century-long silence and uncovers a history of racial terrorism that continues to shape America in the twenty-first century.

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Summary

Summary

A 2016 Smithsonian Magazine Pick of Top Ten History Books

Finalist for the 2017 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction

Longlisted for the 2016 Kirkus Prize

A New York Times Best Book of 2016

A Boston Globe Book of the Year

A Guardian Pick of Best American Writing for Fall 2016

A Chicago Public Library Best of the Best Selection

A Men’s Journal Pick of Best Books of 2016

A Barnes & Noble Best Book of the Year

An Amazon Best Book of 2016

A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2016

A Library Journal Best Book of 2016

A gripping tale of racial cleansing in Forsyth County, Georgia, and a harrowing testament to the deep roots of racial violence in America.

Forsyth County, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century was home to a large African American community that included ministers and teachers, farmers and field hands, tradesmen, servants, and children. Many black residents were poor sharecroppers, but others owned their own farms and the land on which they’d founded the county’s thriving black churches.

But then in September of 1912, three young black laborers were accused of raping and murdering a white girl. One man was dragged from a jail cell and lynched on the town square, two teenagers were hung after a one-day trial, and soon bands of white “night riders” launched a coordinated campaign of arson and terror, driving all 1,098 black citizens out of the county. In the wake of the expulsions, whites harvested the crops and took over the livestock of their former neighbors, and quietly laid claim to “abandoned” land. The charred ruins of homes and churches disappeared into the weeds, until the people and places of black Forsyth were forgotten.

National Book Award finalist Patrick Phillips tells Forsyth’s tragic story in vivid detail and traces its long history of racial violence all the way back to antebellum Georgia. Recalling his own childhood in the 1970s and ’80s, Phillips sheds light on the communal crimes of his hometown and the violent means by which locals kept Forsyth “all white” well into the 1990s.

Blood at the Root is a sweeping American tale that spans the Cherokee removals of the 1830s, the hope and promise of Reconstruction, and the crushing injustice of Forsyth’s racial cleansing. With bold storytelling and lyrical prose, Phillips breaks a century-long silence and uncovers a history of racial terrorism that continues to shape America in the twenty-first century.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

There are places the civil rights movement literally passed by, and for decades Forsyth County was one of those pockets. Blood at the Root is a vital investigation of Forsyth’s history, and of the process by which racial injustice is perpetuated in America. —U.S. Congressman John Lewis, author of March
Phillips' book feels timely, unapologetically discussing the way fear, panic, ignorance, and timing may have kept Forsyth County trapped in the past.—William Lee, The Chicago Tribune
Deeply researched and crisply written, “Blood at the Root’’ is an impressive and timely case study of the racial violence and historical amnesia that characterize much of American history. Phillips…is a gifted storyteller.—Matthew Delmont, The Boston Globe
Nothing undermines social justice more than our collective ignorance about the racial terrorism that haunts too many places in America. Blood at the Root is a must-read, thorough, detailed, and powerful. It’s a story we need to know and never forget. —Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy
Some would say that Patrick Phillips should leave well enough alone and keep quiet… But [his] voice is too honest, too brave, and too brilliant to be silenced. With a poet’s gift for music, and with a detective’s dedication to the facts, Blood at the Root faces the specter of a bloody history without turning its back on the hope that the present has brought us. If the truth sets us free, this book will give you wings. —Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow
Phillips brings a journalist’s crisp perspective to this precise and disquieting account of a reprehensible and underreported chapter in America’s racial history.—Booklist, Starred review
The burden of southern history lies not in what we know about the past but what we do not know. Patrick Phillips uncovers an important untold piece of history… What he reveals in this important book does not make this chilling piece of the past any easier to bear, but he brings it into sharper focus, which is long overdue.—W. Ralph Eubanks, author of Ever is a Long Time: A Journey in Mississippi’s Dark Past
[H]umanizes its subjects and brims with detail….[G]raphic, unflinching, important.—Jennifer Senior, The New York Times
[M]eticulously and elegantly reveals the power of white supremacy…to distort and destroy, not only lives and accomplishments, but historical memory, the law, and basic human civility.—Carol Anderson, The New York Times
“So timely and necessary a powerful reckoning with the past.” Natasha Trethewey, Pulitzer Prize–winning author
“An astonishing and thoroughgoing account…[that] humanizes its subjects and brims with detail.” New York Times
“Gripping and meticulously documented.” Washington Post
“Meticulously and elegantly reveals the power of white supremacy in its many guises…to distort and destroy, not only lives and accomplishments, but historical memory, the law and basic human civility.” New York Times Book Review
“An impressive and timely case study of the racial violence and historical amnesia that characterize much of American history. Phillips…is a gifted storyteller.” Boston Globe
“Phillips’ book feels timely, unapologetically discussing the way fear, panic, ignorance, and timing may have kept Forsyth County trapped in the past.” Chicago Tribune
“This is a gripping, timely, and important examination of American racism, and Phillips tells it with rare clarity and power.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“‘Racial purity is Forsyth’s security,’” whites proclaimed… Throughout the book, Phillips successfully contextualizes Forsyth in American racism’s long history…with moving intimacy.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Patrick Phillips

Author Bio: Patrick Phillips

Patrick Phillips is an award-winning poet, translator, and professor. A Guggenheim and NEA Fellow, he is author of the poetry collection Elegy for a Broken Machine, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. He teaches at Drew University.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 7.15
Audience: Adult
Language: English