And the Show Went On: Cultural Life in Nazi-Occupied Paris

By Alan Riding
Read by Stephen Hoye

16.70 Hours 10/27/2010 unabridged
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    ISBN: 9781400188338

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In the weeks after the Germans captured Paris, theaters, opera houses, and nightclubs reopened to occupiers and French citizens alike, and they remained open for the duration of the war. Alan Riding introduces a pageant of twentieth-century artists who lived and worked under the Nazis and explores the decisions each made about whether to stay or flee, collaborate or resist. We see Maurice Chevalier and Edith Piaf singing before French and German audiences; Picasso painting and occasionally selling his work from his Left Bank apartment; and Marcel Carne and Henri-Georges Clouzot, among others, directing movies in Paris studios (more than two hundred were produced during this time). We see that pro-Fascist writers such as Louis-Ferdinand Celine and Robert Brasillach flourished, but also that Camus's The Stranger was published and Sartre's play No Exit was first performed-ten days before the Normandy landings. Based on exhaustive research and extensive interviews, And the Show Went On sheds a clarifying light on a protean and problematic era in twentieth-century European cultural history.

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Summary

Summary

In the weeks after the Germans captured Paris, theaters, opera houses, and nightclubs reopened to occupiers and French citizens alike, and they remained open for the duration of the war. Alan Riding introduces a pageant of twentieth-century artists who lived and worked under the Nazis and explores the decisions each made about whether to stay or flee, collaborate or resist. We see Maurice Chevalier and Edith Piaf singing before French and German audiences; Picasso painting and occasionally selling his work from his Left Bank apartment; and Marcel Carne and Henri-Georges Clouzot, among others, directing movies in Paris studios (more than two hundred were produced during this time). We see that pro-Fascist writers such as Louis-Ferdinand Celine and Robert Brasillach flourished, but also that Camus's The Stranger was published and Sartre's play No Exit was first performed-ten days before the Normandy landings. Based on exhaustive research and extensive interviews, And the Show Went On sheds a clarifying light on a protean and problematic era in twentieth-century European cultural history.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

A stark account of how we act when evil enters our door. Kirkus

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Alan Riding

Alan Riding is a Brazilian-born Briton who studied economics and law before becoming a journalist and writer. He has worked for Reuters, the Financial Times, the Economist, and the New York Times, reporting from the United Nations in New York, Latin America, and Western Europe. During the final twelve years before he retired from journalism in 2007, he was the European cultural correspondent for the New York Times, based in Paris. Riding is the author of the bestselling book Distant Neighbors and coauthor of Essential Shakespeare Handbook and Opera. He lives in Paris with his wife, Marlise Simons, a writer for the Times.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 16.70
Audience: Adult
Language: English