An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz audiobook

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Read by Laural Merlington

Tantor Audio

Revisioning American History Series: Book 3

10.31 Hours 1
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Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the U.S. settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture and in the highest offices of government and the military. Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples' history radically reframes U.S. history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

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Summary

Summary

A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year in Nonfiction

Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the U.S. settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture and in the highest offices of government and the military. Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples' history radically reframes U.S. history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Meticulously documented, this thought-provoking treatise is sure to generate discussion. Booklist
“Ortiz doesn’t ignore the darker sides of Indian life and history, including Indian ownership of black slaves before the Civil War, but for the most part she points an accusatory finger at the settlers, soldiers, and US presidents who waged what she describes as genocidal warfare against foes labeled ‘savages’ and ‘barbarians.’" San Francisco Chronicle
“Meticulously documented, this thought-provoking treatise is sure to generate discussion.” Booklist
“Dunbar-Ortiz’s material succeeds, but will be eye-opening to those who have not previously encountered such a perspective.” Publishers Weekly
“[An] impassioned history…Belongs on the shelf next to Dee Brown’s classic, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.” San Francisco Chronicle
An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States provides an essential historical reference for all Americans. . . .The American Indians’ perspective has been absent from colonial histories for too long, leaving continued misunderstandings of our struggles for sovereignty and human rights.” Peterson Zah, former president of the Navajo Nation
“This may well be the most important US history book you will read in your lifetime…Dunbar-Ortiz radically reframes US history, destroying all foundational myths to reveal a brutal settler-colonial structure and ideology designed to cover its bloody tracks. Here, rendered in honest, often poetic words, is the story of those tracks and the people who survived—bloodied but unbowed. Spoiler alert: the colonial era is still here, and so are the Indians.” Robin D. G. Kelley, author of Freedom Dreams
An Indigenous Peoples’ History…pulls up the paving stones and lays bare the deep history of the United States, from the corn to the reservations. If the United States is a ‘crime scene’, as she calls it, then Dunbar-Ortiz is its forensic scientist. A sobering look at a grave history.” Vijay Prashad, author of The Poorer Nations

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Author Bio: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz is an American historian, writer, and feminist. She is the author of numerous books and is a professor emerita of ethnic studies at California State University–Hayward.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 10.31
Audience: Adult
Language: English