Origins by Neil deGrasse Tyson audiobook

Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution

By Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith
Read by Kevin Kenerly

8.66 Hours 09/02/2014 Unabridged
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A thrilling and accessible tour of the cosmos Our true origins are not just human, or even terrestrial, but in fact cosmic. Drawing on scientific breakthroughs and the current cross-pollination among geology, biology, astrophysics, and cosmology, Origins explains the soul-stirring leaps in our understanding of the cosmos. From the first image of a galaxy birth to Spirit rover’s exploration of Mars, to the discovery of water on one of Jupiter’s moons, coauthors Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith conduct a galvanizing tour of the cosmos with clarity and exuberance.

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Summary

Summary

A Voice Arts Award Nominee

A thrilling and accessible tour of the cosmos

Our true origins are not just human, or even terrestrial, but in fact cosmic. Drawing on scientific breakthroughs and the current cross-pollination among geology, biology, astrophysics, and cosmology, Origins explains the soul-stirring leaps in our understanding of the cosmos. From the first image of a galaxy birth to Spirit rover’s exploration of Mars, to the discovery of water on one of Jupiter’s moons, coauthors Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith conduct a galvanizing tour of the cosmos with clarity and exuberance.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Who can ask for better cosmic tour guides to the universe than Drs. Tyson and Goldsmith?” Michio Kaku, New York Times bestselling author of Physics of the Future
“Combining twenty-first–century astronomy, astrobiology, astrochemistry, and other disciplines, Origins is a fine guidebook with which to journey ‘back to the beginning of everything.’” Amazon.com, editorial review
“[Tyson] distills the complex breakthroughs of geology, biology, and astrophysics into clear and lively prose.” Barnes & Noble, editorial review
“Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith…[in] a racy and nonmathematical style…encourage us to search for answers that could overturn much of what we think we already know. The task is daunting but the excitement glows from every page.” New Scientist
“Tyson and Goldsmith search the depths of the universe for clues to how billions of heavenly bodies, Earth, and life itself began. They energetically cover the breadth of modern cosmology.” Science News
“Animated, good-natured, and widely appealing.” Eyepiece
“This is the most informative, congenial, and accessible general look at cosmology to come along since Carl Sagan’s Cosmos twenty-seven years ago…General readers of every stripe will benefit from the authors’ sophisticated, deeply knowledgeable presentation.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“An accessible and extremely well-written exploration of the deep waters of cosmology, astrophysics, and exobiology.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
“A terrific historical perspective…Amateur astronomers—in fact, any reader who enjoys popular science—will find fascinating information presented in clear but never patronizing language. Highly recommended.” Library Journal
“The authors adopt a colloquial, even conversational style suited to readers new to the ideas and vocabulary of big-bang cosmology; they make comprehensible the connections between subatomic physics and the structure of the universe…Aiming for mass appeal, Tyson and Goldsmith cover the whole celestial block.” Booklist

Reviews

Reviews

by Rogue Writer 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Better on TV

Being a fan of Neil deGrasse Tyson’s onscreen work in Cosmos and his appearances on talk shows, this book let me down. I think Tyson’s an insanely smart person, but I can’t help but feel after reading this book that there are much more brilliant folks out there who deserve more attention than him, at least in the realm of the written word. I feel the same about Stephen Hawking. Both are brilliant men, but I remain convinced that the diversity factor is why the media powers drew so much attention to them. I draw this comparison based not solely on their physical appearances as compared to others in their field, but also because of what and how they write.

The first time I watched and then read Hawking’s revered A Brief History of Time, I couldn’t help but palm my forehead. The theory of the expanding universe was one I felt was sound, but then Hawking jumps the shark when he conjectures that time would reverse once it reached maximum expansion. He also wouldn’t commit to that theory and made several other educated guesses guised as undeniable truths as to the future of the universe. That’s fine, as I tend not to trust scientists who are too committed to their theories. That was one of the greatest points that I felt Tyson makes in his book: scientists have an obligation to test every hypothesis and scientific “truth” to prove or disprove them. That, in addition to the scientific method, is the key to moving science forward and closer to the “truth.”

Given that expressed philosophical perspective, it surprised me that Tyson makes several statements that hearken to finding answers or certain cosmological events as being “impossible.” It’s kind of like watching episodes of Star Trek up until The Next Generation was drawing to a close. With all the impossible things the crew experienced and still they continued to say things were impossible. The most glaring case of this is when Tyson echoes the majority of scientists’ sentiment that breaking the speed of light is impossible. Well, folks, they said the same about breaking the speed of sound, but Chuck Yeager disproved that one. Or how about controlling the splitting of atoms? And seeing as how the speed of light has a defined limit, then it stands to reason that it can be broken.

Tyson does best the wider he keeps his scope. The closer he hones into Earth, the more his knowledge is stretched. His understanding of geology and biology were woefully limited and imprecise. Also, the few sci-fi references he makes were outdated and exceptionally limited. In all cases, he would have been smarter to have avoided making any such statements. In some parts of the book, Tyson gets a little too complex for the average listener, whereas at other points, he oversimplifies to the point that it comes off as insulting or just plain wrong. You can keep the book; I’ll stick to loving Tyson via the media, especially his excellent off-the-cuff intelligent appearances on talk shows and news programs. He has done more to make science cool since Bill Nye, and Carl Sagan before him.

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/Science
Runtime: 8.66
Audience: Adult
Language: English