The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien audiobook

The Two Towers

By J. R. R. Tolkien
Read by Rob Inglis

The Lord of the Rings Trilogy: Book 2

16.68 Hours 10/18/2012 Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
  • $34.99
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    ISBN: 9781470337605

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Inspired by The Hobbit and begun in 1937, The Lord of the Rings is the saga of the great War of the Rings. As he crafted the alphabets, languages, and landscapes of Middle-earth, Tolkien created one of the most popular and imaginative works in English literature. The Two Towers is the second volume of The Lord of the Rings. The Fellowship has been forced to split up, and Frodo and Sam must continue alone toward Mount Doom, where the ring must be destroyed. Meanwhile, at Helm’s Deep and Isengard, the first great battles of the War of the Ring take shape. In this splendid, unabridged audio production of Tolkien’s great work, all the inhabitants of a magical universe—hobbits, elves, wizards, and humans—step colorfully forth from the pages. Rob Inglis’ narration has been praised as a masterpiece of audio.

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Summary

Summary

Inspired by The Hobbit and begun in 1937, The Lord of the Rings is the saga of the great War of the Rings. As he crafted the alphabets, languages, and landscapes of Middle-earth, Tolkien created one of the most popular and imaginative works in English literature.

The Two Towers is the second volume of The Lord of the Rings. The Fellowship has been forced to split up, and Frodo and Sam must continue alone toward Mount Doom, where the ring must be destroyed. Meanwhile, at Helm’s Deep and Isengard, the first great battles of the War of the Ring take shape. In this splendid, unabridged audio production of Tolkien’s great work, all the inhabitants of a magical universe—hobbits, elves, wizards, and humans—step colorfully forth from the pages. Rob Inglis’ narration has been praised as a masterpiece of audio.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“An extraordinary work—pure excitement, unencumbered narrative, moral warmth, barefaced rejoicing in beauty, but excitement most of all; yet a serious and scrupulous fiction, nothing cozy, no little visits to one’s childhood.” New York Times

Reviews

Reviews

by Downpour.com 9/13/2017

Thank you for bringing the audio "weirdness" to our attention. We will make sure the publisher is aware of the issue.
by Bertie Wooster 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Well Worth the Time

“…we do not say anything…unless it is worth taking time to say and to listen to.” --Treebeard

That’s how Ents, a race of beings whose job is to “shepherd” the trees of the forest (and who, like ordinary shepherds, have come to resemble their charges) approach storytelling. It’s how they approach daily speech, too. That way nobody ever says anything that wastes anyone’s time—which is probably why Ents can afford to take so long saying what few things they do say.

Tolkien’s story proceeds on similar lines. I have spoken to people whom, when informed I’m listening to the Lord of the Rings books, have said they tried but found Tolkien too long-winded. I’ve never considered myself markedly more patient than my fellow man, but I do enjoy a good story. And by good I mean one that entertains and instructs and even illuminates. Tolkien may seem a little long in places, but the illumination is always there and the time is always well spent. Further, now that I have finished the whole journey I can say that the time the story takes makes the world in which it happens and the characters acting it out all the more real and substantial.

I know there are those—literary theorists, mostly—who make a case against audiobooks on the grounds that it deprives the reader of a chance to fully come to grips with the material, to take it in through the eye and assimilate it via the medulla oblongata…or whatever. Who knows? They may be right. All I know is that I was grateful for a guiding hand on pronunciations of character and place names and especially grateful that every song in the three books is performed by Rob Inglis. His reading is masterful, but his singing adds even more to a story that is already bursting with good things.

The one flaw is technical. There is a weird shadow—that’s the best I can describe it—on this recording. I tried downloading it a second time, but the shadow was still there. Not a distortion and not an echo, it’s just a weird thinness in Inglis’ voice. Or, rather, in the way his voice was recorded. It seems to bend from side to side in the middle of sentences. Much of my listening was done on mass transit, so this odd flaw wasn’t a real hindrance. But it is there; hence the three stars for Overall Performance.
by Ash Ryan 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Easily Tolkein's best book

Easily my favorite of all Tolkein's books. He really expands Middle Earth as he follows the stories of each group of the fragmented Fellowship.

As to this audio edition, Rob Inglis's narration is quite good---I enjoyed listening to his characterizations and performances of the songs and so forth.

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Runtime: 16.68
Audience: Adult
Language: English