FEDERALIST No. 66. Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered.  by Alexander Hamilton audiobook

FEDERALIST No. 66. Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered.

By Alexander Hamilton
Read by D. S. Harvey

MP3 Audiobook Classics
0.27 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781982797294

The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. When the Constitutional Convention met in 1787 to revise the Articles of Confederation, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton advocated instead for the creation of a new government. The delegates used the principles contained in Madison’s Virginia Plan to create the Constitution, which was submitted to the states in September 1787. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution. Federalist No. 66 is a continuation of the argument in Federalist No. 65 for the Senate as the trial venue for impeachments. In No. 66 he addresses specific anti-Federalist objections in a series of four rebuttals. The issues addressed are: first, the concern that the Senate is encroaching on the powers of the courts; second, that the Senate itself may become too aristocratic; third, that impartiality may suffer when trying appointed officials previously approved by the same body; and, fourth, that the Senators may be unable to judge their own actions impartially in ratifying treaties.

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Summary

Summary

The Federalist Papers is a series of 85 articles arguing in favor of ratification of the United States Constitution by the thirteen original colonies. When the Constitutional Convention met in 1787 to revise the Articles of Confederation, James Madison and Alexander Hamilton advocated instead for the creation of a new government. The delegates used the principles contained in Madison’s Virginia Plan to create the Constitution, which was submitted to the states in September 1787. The Federalist papers were written in response to criticism of the Constitution.
Federalist No. 66 is a continuation of the argument in Federalist No. 65 for the Senate as the trial venue for impeachments. In No. 66 he addresses specific anti-Federalist objections in a series of four rebuttals. The issues addressed are: first, the concern that the Senate is encroaching on the powers of the courts; second, that the Senate itself may become too aristocratic; third, that impartiality may suffer when trying appointed officials previously approved by the same body; and, fourth, that the Senators may be unable to judge their own actions impartially in ratifying treaties.

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Author Bio: Alexander Hamilton

Author Bio: Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton (1757–1804) was a Founding Father, soldier, economist, political philosopher, one of America’s first constitutional lawyers, and the first United States Secretary of the Treasury. After serving in the Revolutionary War, he was elected to the Continental Congress, ultimately resigning to establish the Bank of New York. Hamilton was a main contributor to the influential Federalist Papers, a collection of essays written by himself, John Jay, and James Madison. He was mortally wounded in a famous duel with presidential candidate Aaron Burr.

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Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 0.27
Audience: Adult
Language: English