Heft by Liz Moore audiobook

Heft

By Liz Moore
Read by Kirby Heyborne and Keith Szarabajka

Blackstone Publishing 9780393081503
11.73 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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A heartwarming novel about larger-than-life characters and second chances Former academic Arthur Opp weighs 550 pounds and hasn’t left his rambling Brooklyn home in a decade. Twenty miles away in Yonkers, seventeen-year-old Kel Keller navigates life as the poor kid in a rich school and pins his hopes on what seems like a promising baseball career—if he can untangle himself from his family drama. The link between this unlikely pair is Kel’s mother, Charlene, a former student of Arthur’s. After nearly two decades of silence, it is Charlene’s unexpected phone call to Arthur—a plea for help—that jostles them into action. Through Arthur and Kel’s own quirky and lovable voices, Heft tells the winning story of two improbable heroes whose sudden connection transforms both their lives. Like Elizabeth McCracken’s The Giant’s House, Heft is a novel about love and family found in the most unexpected places.

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Summary

Summary

A 2013 Audie Award Finalist for Literary Fiction

A 2012 Kirkus Reviews “New and Notable Title”

Selected for the February 2012 Indie Next List

Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award

An iTunes Best Audiobook of 2012: Fiction

On the 2013 ALA Listen List for Outstanding Audiobook Narration

A heartwarming novel about larger-than-life characters and second chances

Former academic Arthur Opp weighs 550 pounds and hasn’t left his rambling Brooklyn home in a decade. Twenty miles away in Yonkers, seventeen-year-old Kel Keller navigates life as the poor kid in a rich school and pins his hopes on what seems like a promising baseball career—if he can untangle himself from his family drama. The link between this unlikely pair is Kel’s mother, Charlene, a former student of Arthur’s. After nearly two decades of silence, it is Charlene’s unexpected phone call to Arthur—a plea for help—that jostles them into action. Through Arthur and Kel’s own quirky and lovable voices, Heft tells the winning story of two improbable heroes whose sudden connection transforms both their lives. Like Elizabeth McCracken’s The Giant’s House, Heft is a novel about love and family found in the most unexpected places.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“This is the real deal, Liz Moore is the real deal—she’s written a novel that will stick with you long after you’ve finished it.” Russell Banks, Pulitzer Prize finalist
“A suspenseful, restorative novel from one of our fine young voices.” Colum McCann, National Book Award–winning author
“Heft is a work that radiantly combines compassion and a clear-eyed vision. This is a novel of rare originality and sophistication.” Mary Gordon, New York Times bestselling author
“In Heft, Liz Moore creates a cast of vulnerable, lonely misfits that will break your heart and then make it soar. What a terrific novel!” Ann Hood, bestselling author of The Red Thread
“As emotionally appealing as Arthur is, he’s in a dead heat with Kel, the other voice of the novel…By the end we are in love with the characters and just want to see them happy.” San Francisco Chronicle
“Moore succeeds in creating an insightful page-turner that seeks to demystify archetypal characters...The writing is quirky, sometimes to a fault, yet original...Moore’s second novel wears its few kinks well.” Publishers Weekly
“Moore’s lovely novel is about overcoming shame and loneliness and learning to connect. It is life-affirming but never sappy.” Library Journal
“Endearing.” Booklist (starred review)
“Only a hardhearted reader will remain immune to Kel’s troubled charm.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
“This deeply touching novel shows that you can choose your family. In Heft, writer-musician Liz Moore alternates Arthur’s story with Kel’s to create a stunningly sad and heroically hopeful tale of two men from fractured families and the women—a high school athlete, a pregnant cleaning lady—who, miraculously, love them. This is a beautiful novel about relationships of the most makeshift kind, about bonds that go beyond the biological. It’s also about how, sometimes, even the deepest wounds can be healed by the simplest, smallest acts of kindness.” O, The Oprah Magazine

Reviews

Reviews

by Rogue Writer 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Loneliness, Hope, and Mastery of Perspectives

This was one of my favorite books of 2012. Liz Moore did so many interesting things in this story of Arthur Opp, a 550-pound shut-in, and Kel, an 18 year old high school sports phenom. One woman ties their otherwise separate lives together: Charlene Turner, Kel’s mother and one-time penpal and love interest of Arthur.

The theme of this book is loneliness. Arthur’s is obvious, as he has very little contact with anyone from the outside. Charlene’s stems from her addictions and from having failed to obtain her perceived potential. And despite being surrounded by peers who adore and admire him, Kel is consistently keeping true intimacy from forming with most of his friends because he doesn’t want them to know he’s the poor kid in a school filled with privileged youth.

Each chapter switches perspective, rocking between Arthur and Kel. Liz Moore skillfully crafts two distinctly different voices for her two main characters. Narrators Kirby Heyborne as Kel and Keith Szarabajka as Arthur provide the perfect voicing for the characters and is a nice touch for the audio version. However, as enjoyable as it is, dual narration isn’t necessary to convey the different character voices because of how masterfully Liz Moore wrote the sections. She does this not only through diction, but also by switching tenses for Arthur and Kel. Arthur’s sections are told in past tense, which I felt illustrates how he lives in the past. Kel’s are told in the present tense, which reinforces the notion that he lives from day to day as most youth do, but especially those with limited prospects despite their immense talent. The print version reveals many other textual based techniques that set Arthur’s and Kel’s chapters apart.

The way Arthur and Kel come together is told in a way that leads the listener to draw further conclusions about how they are connected, only to later have those assumptions overturned. One of the greatest criticisms about this book is that it ends without enough closure, without enough explanation as to what happens between and to Arthur and Kel. But that’s the way I like my books, when they leave some questions unanswered and allow the future to remain uncertain. I appreciate it when an author is fearless in her approach to storytelling and is intrepid in employing an experimental style. Liz Moore is just such an author. I hope she continues to do new and interesting things in the future.

Author

Author Bio: Liz Moore

Author Bio: Liz Moore

Liz Moore is a writer of fiction and creative nonfiction. A winner of the 2014-2015 Rome Prize, she is an assistant professor of writing at Holy Family University.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Fiction
Runtime: 11.73
Audience: Adult
Language: English