I Have Lived a Thousand Years by Livia Bitton-Jackson audiobook

I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust

By Livia Bitton-Jackson
Read by Christine Williams

Blackstone Publishing, Blackstone Publishing
6.63 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781482985504

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    ISBN: 9781482150087

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    ISBN: 9781620647387

Imagine being a thirteen-year-old girl in love with boys, school, family—life itself. Then suddenly, in a matter of hours, your life is shattered by the arrival of a foreign army. You can no longer attend school, have possessions, talk to your neighbors. One day your family has to leave your house behind and move into a crowded ghetto, where you lose all privacy and there isn’t enough food to eat. Still you manage, somehow, to adjust. But there is much, much worse to come … This is the memoir of Elli Friedmann, who was thirteen years old in March 1944, when the Nazis invaded Hungary. It describes her descent into the hell of Auschwitz, a concentration camp where, because of her golden braids, she was selected for work instead of extermination. In intimate, excruciating details, she recounts what it was like to be one of the few teenage camp inmates, and the tiny but miraculous twists of fate that helped her survive against all odds. I Have Lived a Thousand Years is a searing story of cruelty and suffering, but at the same time it is a story of hope, faith, perseverance, and love. It will make you see the world in a new way—and it will make you want to change what you see.

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Summary

Summary

Winner of the Christopher Award

Imagine being a thirteen-year-old girl in love with boys, school, family—life itself. Then suddenly, in a matter of hours, your life is shattered by the arrival of a foreign army. You can no longer attend school, have possessions, talk to your neighbors. One day your family has to leave your house behind and move into a crowded ghetto, where you lose all privacy and there isn’t enough food to eat. Still you manage, somehow, to adjust. But there is much, much worse to come …

This is the memoir of Elli Friedmann, who was thirteen years old in March 1944, when the Nazis invaded Hungary. It describes her descent into the hell of Auschwitz, a concentration camp where, because of her golden braids, she was selected for work instead of extermination. In intimate, excruciating details, she recounts what it was like to be one of the few teenage camp inmates, and the tiny but miraculous twists of fate that helped her survive against all odds. I Have Lived a Thousand Years is a searing story of cruelty and suffering, but at the same time it is a story of hope, faith, perseverance, and love. It will make you see the world in a new way—and it will make you want to change what you see.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“While the facts alone command attention, Bitton-Jackson’s supple and measured writing would compel the reader even if applied to a less momentous subject…Brutal, frank, and terrifying…An exceptional story, exceptionally well told.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Reviews

Reviews

by M.A. 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Intense and Graphic true account of teenager growing during the Holocaust

This is a review of the audiobook and since I did not find the narration to be of much benefit to this true account, I am only giving it 3 stars. The book, though I believe it to be written by the author as an adult, is an account of her experience during the Holocaust as a young teenager (13-14 yrs old). It would have felt more appropriate to have selected a younger narrator to match the age of the author more closely during the time of the Holocaust. I can compliment the narrator in that she seemed to pronounce German words reasonably well as far as I could speculate even though I do not speak German. The narration felt like it was at too much of a constantly fevered pitch conveying desperation throughout ...feeling unauthentic even under such tragic and desperate circumstances. As the victims experienced increased malnutrition/starvation and other horrible abuses, it would somehow seem implausible to be able to physically and mentally maintain such a fevered emotional state throughout every hour of every day. Perhaps I am mistaken in that conjecture, but the tone of the narration felt overly melodramatic even for the desperate and horrific circumstances experienced. It would seem that a broader range of emotions (in addition to desperation) could have been authentically conveyed and portrayed through the narration, but such was not the case in my experience. Reading a book such as this one about the Holocaust is, of course, very difficult due to the horrific circumstances and some quite graphic descriptions. Though not exactly enjoyable to read (or listen, in my case), I could still recommend this book for anyone interested in delving into a first hand account of the Holocaust. I believe it is beneficial to never forget such overwhelmingly inhumane and egregious acts/events in history (and present day as well) so we can do all we can to eradicate and prevent them. The ending is relatively positive since the author is a survivor, along with her mother and brother, though she certainly does not ignore the fate of those innumerable victims / souls who did not survive. It is a gift to others that survivors such as the author are able to record and illuminate true accounts of such events so they are hopefully never forgotten or dismissed. Would probably give 3 1/2 to 4 stars to book in print.

Author

Author Bio: Livia Bitton-Jackson

Author Bio: Livia Bitton-Jackson

Titles by Author

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD
Category: Fiction
Runtime: 6.63
Audience: Children (8–12)
Language: English