Pew by Catherine Lacey audiobook

Pew: A Novel

By Catherine Lacey
Read by Bahni Turpin

Brilliance Audio 9780374230920
6.54 Hours 1
Format : CD (In Stock)
  • Regular Price: $35.99

    Special Price $23.39

    ISBN: 9781799767657

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

“The people of this community are stifling, and generous, cruel, earnest, needy, overconfident, fragile and repressive, which is to say that they are brilliantly rendered by their wise maker, Catherine Lacey.” --Rachel Kushner, author of The Flamethrowers One of Vogue's Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2020, one of the Wall Street Journal's Nine Best Books to Read This Spring, one of BuzzFeed's Most Anticipated Books of 2020, one of Esquire's 20 Must-Read Books of Summer 2020, one of Vulture's Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2020, one of Refinery29's 25 Books You'll Want to Read This Summer, one of Financial Times' Summer Books of 2020, and one of The Millions Most Anticipated Books of the First Half of 2020 A figure with no discernible identity appears in a small, religious town, throwing its inhabitants into a frenzy In a small, unnamed town in the American South, a church congregation arrives for a service and finds a figure asleep on a pew. The person is genderless and racially ambiguous and refuses to speak. One family takes in the strange visitor and nicknames them Pew. As the town spends the week preparing for a mysterious Forgiveness Festival, Pew is shuttled from one household to the next. The earnest and seemingly well-meaning townspeople see conflicting identities in Pew, and many confess their fears and secrets to them in one-sided conversations. Pew listens and observes while experiencing brief flashes of past lives or clues about their origin. As days pass, the void around Pew’s presence begins to unnerve the community, whose generosity erodes into menace and suspicion. Yet by the time Pew’s story reaches a shattering and unsettling climax at the Forgiveness Festival, the secret of who they really are—a devil or an angel or something else entirely—is dwarfed by even larger truths. Pew, Catherine Lacey’s third novel, is a foreboding, provocative, and amorphous fable about the world today: its contradictions, its flimsy morality, and the limits of judging others based on their appearance. With precision and restraint, one of our most beloved and boundary-pushing writers holds up a mirror to her characters’ true selves, revealing something about forgiveness, perception, and the faulty tools society uses to categorize human complexity.

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Summary

Summary

A USA Today Pick of the Week

A London Guardian Pick of the Day

“The people of this community are stifling, and generous, cruel, earnest, needy, overconfident, fragile and repressive, which is to say that they are brilliantly rendered by their wise maker, Catherine Lacey.” --Rachel Kushner, author of The Flamethrowers

One of Vogue's Books We Can’t Wait to Read in 2020, one of the Wall Street Journal's Nine Best Books to Read This Spring, one of BuzzFeed's Most Anticipated Books of 2020, one of Esquire's 20 Must-Read Books of Summer 2020, one of Vulture's Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2020, one of Refinery29's 25 Books You'll Want to Read This Summer, one of Financial Times' Summer Books of 2020, and one of The Millions Most Anticipated Books of the First Half of 2020

A figure with no discernible identity appears in a small, religious town, throwing its inhabitants into a frenzy

In a small, unnamed town in the American South, a church congregation arrives for a service and finds a figure asleep on a pew. The person is genderless and racially ambiguous and refuses to speak. One family takes in the strange visitor and nicknames them Pew.

As the town spends the week preparing for a mysterious Forgiveness Festival, Pew is shuttled from one household to the next. The earnest and seemingly well-meaning townspeople see conflicting identities in Pew, and many confess their fears and secrets to them in one-sided conversations. Pew listens and observes while experiencing brief flashes of past lives or clues about their origin. As days pass, the void around Pew’s presence begins to unnerve the community, whose generosity erodes into menace and suspicion. Yet by the time Pew’s story reaches a shattering and unsettling climax at the Forgiveness Festival, the secret of who they really are—a devil or an angel or something else entirely—is dwarfed by even larger truths.

Pew, Catherine Lacey’s third novel, is a foreboding, provocative, and amorphous fable about the world today: its contradictions, its flimsy morality, and the limits of judging others based on their appearance. With precision and restraint, one of our most beloved and boundary-pushing writers holds up a mirror to her characters’ true selves, revealing something about forgiveness, perception, and the faulty tools society uses to categorize human complexity.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Narrator Bahni Turpin gives a tour-de-force performance in this strange allegory featuring a nondescript person found sleeping on a church pew in a small, unnamed Southern town.… Turpin's extraordinary range includes everyone from small children to older men and women. In one scene involving the mysterious annual Forgiveness Festival, Turpin switches age and gender with the ease of water slipping through one's fingers. PEW is a strange ride, but trust Turpin to steer the ship. AudioFile Magazine, Earphones Award Winner
"[Bahni] Turpin narrates with a newscaster-like calm in the first person thoughts of the titular character—a mysterious child, somewhat ambiguous in gender and race.… A provocative meditation on the duplicity of appearances, strongly voiced. Booklist, starred review
“Pew is a masterpiece of misdirection…This is a novel about preconception, moral blindness and the long fingers of guilt.” The Scotsman
“An ambitious story of compassion, cruelty, and belonging, as well as a powerful exploration of the dangers posed by white guilt and institutionalized religion.” Esquire
“I began to see Pew as an incarnation of the town’s purged memories―a passive, shapeless presence loaded with a million projected meanings that, much like this book, you could spend a lifetime decoding.” Wall Street Journal

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Catherine Lacey

Author Bio: Catherine Lacey

Catherine Lacey is a novelist and author whose work has appeared in Guernica, the Atlantic, the Believer, the New York Times, McSweeney’s Quarterly, the Paris Review online, Electric Literature, and many others. She was named among the “Faces to Watch“ by the Los Angeles Times in 2017 and a “New Voice” by Granta in 2014. She has earned fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts and Columbia University, where she earned an MFA in nonfiction.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : CD
Category: Fiction/Literary
Runtime: 6.54
Audience: Adult
Language: English