Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy by Joseph E. Stiglitz audiobook

Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy: An Agenda for Growth and Shared Prosperity

By Joseph E Stiglitz
Read by Fred Sanders

Random House Audio
5.89 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
  • $15.00
    or 1 Credit

    ISBN: 9780451486523

    $12.99 With Membership: Learn More

Inequality is a choice. The United States bills itself as the land of opportunity, a place where anyone can achieve success and a better life through hard work and determination. But the facts tell a different story—the U.S. today lags behind most other developed nations in measures of inequality and economic mobility. For decades, wages have stagnated for the majority of workers while economic gains have disproportionately gone to the top one percent. Education, housing, and health care—essential ingredients for individual success—are growing ever more expensive. Deeply rooted structural discrimination continues to hold down women and people of color, and more than one-fifth of all American children now live in poverty. These trends are on track to become even worse in the future. Some economists claim that today’s bleak conditions are inevitable consequences of market outcomes, globalization, and technological progress. If we want greater equality, they argue, we have to sacrifice growth. This is simply not true. American inequality is the result of misguided structural rules that actually constrict economic growth. We have stripped away worker protections and family support systems, created a tax system that rewards short-term gains over long-term investment, offered a de facto public safety net to too-big-to-fail financial institutions, and chosen monetary and fiscal policies that promote wealth over full employment.

Learn More
Membership Details
  • Only $12.99/month gets you 1 Credit/month
  • Cancel anytime
  • Hate a book? Then we do too, and we'll exchange it.
See how it works in 15 seconds

Summary

Summary

Inequality is a choice.

The United States bills itself as the land of opportunity, a place where anyone can achieve success and a better life through hard work and determination. But the facts tell a different story—the U.S. today lags behind most other developed nations in measures of inequality and economic mobility. For decades, wages have stagnated for the majority of workers while economic gains have disproportionately gone to the top one percent. Education, housing, and health care—essential ingredients for individual success—are growing ever more expensive. Deeply rooted structural discrimination continues to hold down women and people of color, and more than one-fifth of all American children now live in poverty. These trends are on track to become even worse in the future.

Some economists claim that today’s bleak conditions are inevitable consequences of market outcomes, globalization, and technological progress. If we want greater equality, they argue, we have to sacrifice growth. This is simply not true. American inequality is the result of misguided structural rules that actually constrict economic growth. We have stripped away worker protections and family support systems, created a tax system that rewards short-term gains over long-term investment, offered a de facto public safety net to too-big-to-fail financial institutions, and chosen monetary and fiscal policies that promote wealth over full employment.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

At a time when 25 hedge fund managers make more than all our nation’s kindergarten teachers combined, it is clear that the rules are rigged in favor of the wealthy few. Joseph Stiglitz has proposed a bold plan to rewrite these rules by rebuilding our economy for the twenty-first century.—Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers
An aggressive blueprint for rewriting 35 years of policies [that] have led to a vast concentration of wealth among the richest Americans and an increasingly squeezed middle class.—New York Times
The secret truth about economic inequality in America: once you look at the issue this way, it’s hard to think of it any other way.—Time
Stiglitz realizes that deepening inequality in our country is not an unlucky act of nature, but a consequence of the policies we have chosen. This lively book suggests a whole menu of policy changes to move us toward a more widely shared prosperity.—Robert Solow, winner of the Nobel Prize
“Stiglitz realizes that deepening inequality in our country is not an unlucky act of nature, but a consequence of the policies we have chosen. This lively book suggests a whole menu of policy changes to move us toward a more widely shared prosperity.” Robert Solow, winner of the Nobel Prize
“The secret truth about economic inequality in America: once you look at the issue this way, it’s hard to think of it any other way.” Time
“An aggressive blueprint for rewriting thirty-five years of policies [that] have led to a vast concentration of wealth among the richest Americans and an increasingly squeezed middle class.” New York Times

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Joseph E. Stiglitz

Author Bio: Joseph E. Stiglitz

Joseph E. Stiglitz, winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize for Economics, is the author of Making Globalization Work; Globalization and Its Discontents; and, with Linda Bilmes, The Three Trillion Dollar War. He was chairman of President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and served as senior vice president and chief economist at the World Bank. He teaches at Columbia University.

Titles by Author

Author Bio: Joseph E Stiglitz

Author Bio: Joseph E Stiglitz

Joseph E. Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize–winning economist and the bestselling author of The Price of Inequality, Freefall, and Globalization and Its Discontents. He is a columnist for the New York Times and Project Syndicate and has written for Vanity Fair, Politico, the Atlantic, and Harper’s. He teaches at Columbia University and lives in New York City.

Titles by Author

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/Business & Economics
Runtime: 5.89
Audience: Adult
Language: English