The Bishop’s Wife by Robert Nathan audiobook

The Bishop’s Wife

By Robert Nathan
Read by Stephen R. Thorne

Blackstone Publishing, Blackstone Publishing
3.05 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781482929584

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This classic novel is the inspiration behind thebeloved Christmas film of the same name starring Cary Grant and Loretta Young. BishopHenry Brougham desperately wants to build a great cathedral for his overcrowdedparish. The problem is he doesn’t know how he will find a capable archdeacon tohelp fund the project. But that’s not his only problem. Though his beautifulwife Julia fulfills her marital duties, there is no passion between them. Whenthe bishop prays for help, it comes in the form of Michael, a handsome, golden-hairedangel who takes the position of archdeacon. Michael exudes love, which drawsnew and unexpected emotions from Julia. However, Michael’s limitless capacityfor love is stifled by his mortal duties of manipulating money from wealthyreligious patrons. With the holidays approaching, the bishop senses the mutualattraction between Julia and Michael. Will the purity of a divine love lureJulia away, or will her sense of marital duty prevail?

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Summary

Summary

This classic novel is the inspiration behind thebeloved Christmas film of the same name starring Cary Grant and Loretta Young.

BishopHenry Brougham desperately wants to build a great cathedral for his overcrowdedparish. The problem is he doesn’t know how he will find a capable archdeacon tohelp fund the project. But that’s not his only problem. Though his beautifulwife Julia fulfills her marital duties, there is no passion between them. Whenthe bishop prays for help, it comes in the form of Michael, a handsome, golden-hairedangel who takes the position of archdeacon. Michael exudes love, which drawsnew and unexpected emotions from Julia. However, Michael’s limitless capacityfor love is stifled by his mortal duties of manipulating money from wealthyreligious patrons.

With the holidays approaching, the bishop senses the mutualattraction between Julia and Michael. Will the purity of a divine love lureJulia away, or will her sense of marital duty prevail?

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Mr. Nathan’s method of approach is the way of the goldfinch with the thistledown, or of the unconcerned robin guilelessly cocking his head before the peck. Moreover, the words that he uses are as cobwebs that catch the dew of his thought—delicately patterned filaments exactly adequate to the burden glistening upon them. In short, to say that The Bishop’s Wife has beauty, charm, wit, and wisdom is not to overpraise the book.” Saturday Review of Literature

Reviews

Reviews

by Bertie Wooster 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

What the…?

I think—and this is only a guess—but I think the main premise of this novel is that somewhere, somehow, there was a massive disconnect in man’s relationship with God. Now, in 1928, when The Bishop’s Wife was published, it’s gotten so bad that religious people think it their bounden duty to not enjoy sex, angels sent to provide divine guidance are instead all too human and do things like fall in love and kiss other men’s wives, and somehow angels—and, by extension, God Himself—are helpless to change “what man has made them”. All theology and philosophy just get in the way, spoiling the greater vision God had in mind for us—a vision that is never articulated but only mourned over because it’s so irretrievable. I don’t know when three hours ever seemed so long.

The puerility of the premise—if indeed that is the premise of this muddled book—would be bad enough. The thin writing and wooden character development make things even worse. Stephen Thorne’s narration is as straightforward and un-nuanced as the words he’s reading, but then that may not be his fault. He had very little to work with here.

Not that Nathan wasn’t on to some important things. Our pride in our technology, our buildings and prosperity are indeed things that threaten to replace God in our lives. The problem in Nathan’s vision (as far as I can understand it) is that the alternative—drawing closer to God—is impossible because of that now-unbridgeable gap that exists due to that undefined disconnect that happened sometime or other way back when.

Maybe I’m completely wrong. Maybe I’m too perky. But I just can’t assent to the profound hopelessness that inhabits this book.

Author

Author Bio: Robert Nathan

Author Bio: Robert Nathan

Robert Nathan (1894–1985) was born in New York City and educated at private schools in the United States and Switzerland. While attending Harvard, where he was a classmate of E. E. Cummings, he was an editor of the Harvard Monthly, in which his first stories and poems appeared. After becoming a full-time writer, Nathan’s work strengthened his reputation with both the public and peers. F. Scott Fitzgerald once referred to Nathan as his favorite writer. Five of his novels have been made into films, including Portrait of Jennie and The Bishop’s Wife. Nathan ultimately authored more than fifty volumes of novels, poetry, and plays, and from this body of distinguished work he acquired a reputation as a master of satiric fantasy.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD
Category: Fiction/Classics
Runtime: 3.05
Audience: Adult
Language: English