The Book of the People by A. N. Wilson audiobook

The Book of the People: How to Read the Bible

By A. N. Wilson
Read by Derek Perkins

Blackstone Publishing 9780062433466
6.05 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
  • $19.95
    or 1 Credit

    ISBN: 9781504719605

    $12.99 With Membership: Learn More
  • $6.95

    ISBN: 9781504719582

  • $32.95

    ISBN: 9781504719636

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

  • $29.95

    ISBN: 9781504719629

    In Stock ● Ships in 1-2 days

From renowned historian, biographer, and novelist A. N. Wilson comes a deeply personal, literary, and historical exploration of the Bible. In The Book of the People, A. N. Wilson explores how readers and thinkers have approached the Bible, and how it might be read today. Charting his own relationship with the Bible over a lifetime of writing, Wilson argues that it remains relevant even in a largely secular society, as a philosophical work, a work of literature, and a cultural touchstone that the western world has answered to for nearly two thousand years: Martin Luther King was “reading the Bible” when he started the civil rights movement, as was Michelangelo when he painted the fresco cycles in the Sistine Chapel. Wilson challenges the way fundamentalists—whether believers or nonbelievers—have misused the Bible, either by neglecting and failing to recognize its cultural significance or by using it as a weapon against those with whom they disagree. Erudite, witty, and accessible, The Book of the People seeks to reclaim the Good Book as our seminal work of literature and a book for the imagination.

Learn More
Membership Details
  • Only $12.99/month gets you 1 Credit/month
  • Cancel anytime
  • Hate a book? Then we do too, and we'll exchange it.
See how it works in 15 seconds

Summary

Summary

From renowned historian, biographer, and novelist A. N. Wilson comes a deeply personal, literary, and historical exploration of the Bible.

In The Book of the People, A. N. Wilson explores how readers and thinkers have approached the Bible, and how it might be read today. Charting his own relationship with the Bible over a lifetime of writing, Wilson argues that it remains relevant even in a largely secular society, as a philosophical work, a work of literature, and a cultural touchstone that the western world has answered to for nearly two thousand years: Martin Luther King was “reading the Bible” when he started the civil rights movement, as was Michelangelo when he painted the fresco cycles in the Sistine Chapel. Wilson challenges the way fundamentalists—whether believers or nonbelievers—have misused the Bible, either by neglecting and failing to recognize its cultural significance or by using it as a weapon against those with whom they disagree.

Erudite, witty, and accessible, The Book of the People seeks to reclaim the Good Book as our seminal work of literature and a book for the imagination.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Richly stimulating.” Sunday Times (London)
“An elegant and insightful book.” Independent (London)
“Wilson’s delightful and unexpectedly moving book is characterized by intellectual humility.” New Statesman (London)
“Wilson, a convert from atheism to Christianity, weaves together meditations on the Bible with personal anecdotes…Wilson soars in describing how we can find this imaginative Bible through George Herbert’s poetry or the work of Simone Weil or Martin Luther King Jr., or in the Hagia Sophia or a Eucharist service. Those who enjoyed Brock and Parker’s Saving Paradise will likely take pleasure in this similarly positive take on viewing the Bible through the lens of the arts.” Publishers Weekly

Reviews

Reviews

by Tad Davis 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Story
Narration

Frustrating

# The book of the people (AN Wilson)
This is a frustrating book. It's not the narration by Derek Perkins, which is excellent: it's the attempt by Wilson to do too many things at one time.

The book is part memoir, with many passages describing Wilson's fond memories of a woman he calls L. L was an older woman who befriended him in a mythology class at university; for several decades, they carry on a discussion, in person and by letter, about religion: L is for and Wilson, for most of his life, is against.

L has since died, but she left notes for a book about the Bible she'd always wanted to write, and suggested that maybe Wilson could use her notes and write it: and he says this book is an attempt to do just that.

It's also part apology - in the more literal modern sense of an expression of regret. Wilson has written a few books about the Bible, including a biography of Jesus, and he here disavows them all. He has since gotten religion, and he wants to set the record straight.

It's part biblical history and analysis, which is what the title seems to promise. His analysis is marred by its mixture with apology: having been a proponent of research into the historical Jesus, he now announces that the project is impossible and misguided and the only thing worth studying is the Christ of faith.

Yet he's inconsistent about this. He rejects New Testament scholarship, but he embraces Old Testament scholarship, in particular the "documentary hypothesis" about multiple geographical and theological sources for the Torah. He is horrified when he reads about a Muslim who is punished for suggesting that Daniel did not really spend a night in the lion's den. It's not history, he says: it's poetry.

And as in his earlier books, Wilson can't resist the occasional crank opinion. In his biography of Jesus, it was the argument that Malchus, the servant of the high priest whose ear is cut off, is actually the man who became the apostle Paul. Here, it's the argument that the John who wrote the Gospel of John and the Book of Revelation is the same John who was the son of the high priest Caiaphas.

He even (briefly) entertains the possibility that both Jesus and Paul were fictional - a crank theory that almost no scholar of the New Testament would accept. He thinks it wouldn't make much difference. I'm not a Christian, but I don't see how that could be true: it seems to me that the faith would stand or fall on the historical existence of Jesus.

It's a very unsatisfying book, and near the end I have to admit I was glancing at my watch.

Author

Author Bio: A. N. Wilson

Author Bio: A. N. Wilson

A. N. Wilson is a renowned British journalist and author. He has written several acclaimed biographies, including Tolstoy, C. S. Lewis, Jesus, and Paul. He taught for seven years at Oxford before becoming a journalist. He has won numerous awards, including the E. M. Forster Award, the Whitbread Biography Award, and the Somerset Maugham Award. A frequent contributor to the Daily Mail, Times Literary Supplement, New Statesman, Spectator, and Observer, he lives in London.

Titles by Author

See All

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/Religion
Runtime: 6.05
Audience: Adult
Language: English