The Domestic Revolution by Ruth Goodman audiobook

The Domestic Revolution: How the Introduction of Coal into Victorian Homes Changed Everything

By Ruth Goodman
Read by Jennifer M. Dixon

Tantor Audio
11.26 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781705248904

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"The queen of living history" (Lucy Worsley) returns with an immersive account of how English women sparked a worldwide revolution—from their own kitchens. No single invention epitomizes the Victorian era more than the black cast-iron range. Aware that the twenty-first-century has reduced it to a quaint relic, Ruth Goodman was determined to prove that the hot coal stove provided so much more than morning tea: it might even have kick-started the Industrial Revolution. Wielding the wit and passion seen in How to Be a Victorian, Goodman traces the tectonic shift from wood to coal in the mid-sixteenth century—from sooty trials and errors during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I to the totally smog-clouded reign of Queen Victoria. A pattern of innovation emerges as the women stoking these fires also stoked new global industries: from better soap to clean smudges to new ingredients for cooking. Laced with uproarious anecdotes of Goodman's own experience managing a coal-fired household, this fascinating book shines a hot light on the power of domestic necessity.

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Summary

Summary

"The queen of living history" (Lucy Worsley) returns with an immersive account of how English women sparked a worldwide revolution—from their own kitchens.

No single invention epitomizes the Victorian era more than the black cast-iron range. Aware that the twenty-first-century has reduced it to a quaint relic, Ruth Goodman was determined to prove that the hot coal stove provided so much more than morning tea: it might even have kick-started the Industrial Revolution. Wielding the wit and passion seen in How to Be a Victorian, Goodman traces the tectonic shift from wood to coal in the mid-sixteenth century—from sooty trials and errors during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I to the totally smog-clouded reign of Queen Victoria. A pattern of innovation emerges as the women stoking these fires also stoked new global industries: from better soap to clean smudges to new ingredients for cooking. Laced with uproarious anecdotes of Goodman's own experience managing a coal-fired household, this fascinating book shines a hot light on the power of domestic necessity.

Reviews

Reviews

by Ophelia 4/22/2021
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Wonderful

I've yet to read a book by Ruth Goodman that wasn't as fascinating as it was delightful. I have always loved history, but I adore Goodman's coverage of the daily grind, especially for women (whose everyday realities have been overlooked and dismissed as petty by history generally, as though remote wars and royal power struggles represent the real sum of human experience). I had never thought about how something as seemingly minor as the transition from wood to coal fires might impact so much of life, cooking and cleaning in addition to technological advances. Excellent narrator as well.

Author

Author Bio: Ruth Goodman

Author Bio: Ruth Goodman

Ruth Goodman is the author of How to Be a Victorian. A historian of British social and domestic life, she has presented a number of BBC television series, including Tudor Monastery Farm. She served as a historical advisor on the BBC’s miniseries Wolf Hall. She lives in England.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/Technology & Engineering
Runtime: 11.26
Audience: Adult
Language: English