The Girls by Emma Cline audiobook

The Girls: A Novel

By Emma Cline
Read by Cady McClain

Random House Audio, Penguin Random House 9780812998603
9.75 Hours 1
Format : Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9780147524003

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An indelible portrait of girls, the women they become, and that moment in life when everything can go horribly wrong—this stunning first novel is perfect for readers of Jeffrey Eugenides’s The Virgin Suicides and Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND NPR Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamous cult and the man who is its charismatic leader. Hidden in the hills, their sprawling ranch is eerie and run down, but to Evie, it is exotic, thrilling, charged—a place where she feels desperate to be accepted. As she spends more time away from her mother and the rhythms of her daily life, and as her obsession with Suzanne intensifies, Evie does not realize she is coming closer and closer to unthinkable violence. Emma Cline’s remarkable debut novel is gorgeously written and spellbinding, with razor-sharp precision and startling psychological insight. The Girls is a brilliant work of fiction. Praise for The Girls “Spellbinding . . . A seductive and arresting coming-of-age story hinged on Charles Manson, told in sentences at times so finely wrought they could almost be worn as jewelry . . . [Emma] Cline gorgeously maps the topography of one loneliness-ravaged adolescent heart. She gives us the fictional truth of a girl chasing danger beyond her comprehension, in a Summer of Longing and Loss.”The New York Times Book Review “[The Girls reimagines] the American novel . . . Like Mary Gaitskill’s Veronica or Lorrie Moore’s Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?, The Girls captures a defining friendship in its full humanity with a touch of rock-memoir, tell-it-like-it-really-was attitude.”Vogue “Debut novels like this are rare, indeed. . . . The most remarkable quality of this novel is Cline’s ability to articulate the anxieties of adolescence in language that’s gorgeously poetic without mangling the authenticity of a teenager’s consciousness. The adult’s melancholy reflection and the girl’s swelling impetuousness are flawlessly braided together. . . . For a story that traffics in the lurid notoriety of the Manson murders, The Girls is an extraordinary act of restraint. With the maturity of a writer twice her age, Cline has written a wise novel that’s never showy: a quiet, seething confession of yearning and terror.”The Washington Post “Emma Cline has an unparalleled eye for the intricacies of girlhood, turning the stuff of myth into something altogether more intimate. She reminds us that behind so many of our culture’s fables exists a girl: unseen, unheard, angry. This book will break your heart and blow your mind.”—Lena Dunham “Emma Cline’s first novel positively hums with fresh, startling, luminous prose. The Girls announces the arrival of a thrilling new voice in American fiction.”—Jennifer Egan “I don’t know which is more amazing, Emma Cline’s understanding of human beings or her mastery of language.”—Mark Haddon, New York Times bestselling author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

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Summary

Summary

A New York Times Bestseller

A New York Times Editor’s Choice

A 2016 Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize Shortlist Selection

One of People Magazine’s “Great Reads” for Summer

A Huffington Post Best Book of 2016

A Flavorwire Pick for the 50 Most Anticipated Books of 2016

An Amazon Best Book of the Month for June 2016

A Barnes & Noble Summer Discover Pick for June 2016

A Publishers Weekly Pick for Best Summer Reads of 2016 

Winner of an AudioFile Earphones Award

A Library Journal Editor’s Pick for Spring Books

A BookPage Top Pick for June 2016

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • An indelible portrait of girls, the women they become, and that moment in life when everything can go horribly wrong—this stunning first novel is perfect for readers of Jeffrey Eugenides’s The Virgin Suicides and Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad.

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND NPR

Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamous cult and the man who is its charismatic leader. Hidden in the hills, their sprawling ranch is eerie and run down, but to Evie, it is exotic, thrilling, charged—a place where she feels desperate to be accepted. As she spends more time away from her mother and the rhythms of her daily life, and as her obsession with Suzanne intensifies, Evie does not realize she is coming closer and closer to unthinkable violence.

Emma Cline’s remarkable debut novel is gorgeously written and spellbinding, with razor-sharp precision and startling psychological insight. The Girls is a brilliant work of fiction.

Praise for The Girls

“Spellbinding . . . A seductive and arresting coming-of-age story hinged on Charles Manson, told in sentences at times so finely wrought they could almost be worn as jewelry . . . [Emma] Cline gorgeously maps the topography of one loneliness-ravaged adolescent heart. She gives us the fictional truth of a girl chasing danger beyond her comprehension, in a Summer of Longing and Loss.”The New York Times Book Review

“[The Girls reimagines] the American novel . . . Like Mary Gaitskill’s Veronica or Lorrie Moore’s Who Will Run the Frog Hospital?, The Girls captures a defining friendship in its full humanity with a touch of rock-memoir, tell-it-like-it-really-was attitude.”Vogue

“Debut novels like this are rare, indeed. . . . The most remarkable quality of this novel is Cline’s ability to articulate the anxieties of adolescence in language that’s gorgeously poetic without mangling the authenticity of a teenager’s consciousness. The adult’s melancholy reflection and the girl’s swelling impetuousness are flawlessly braided together. . . . For a story that traffics in the lurid notoriety of the Manson murders, The Girls is an extraordinary act of restraint. With the maturity of a writer twice her age, Cline has written a wise novel that’s never showy: a quiet, seething confession of yearning and terror.”The Washington Post

“Emma Cline has an unparalleled eye for the intricacies of girlhood, turning the stuff of myth into something altogether more intimate. She reminds us that behind so many of our culture’s fables exists a girl: unseen, unheard, angry. This book will break your heart and blow your mind.”—Lena Dunham

“Emma Cline’s first novel positively hums with fresh, startling, luminous prose. The Girls announces the arrival of a thrilling new voice in American fiction.”—Jennifer Egan

“I don’t know which is more amazing, Emma Cline’s understanding of human beings or her mastery of language.”—Mark Haddon, New York Times bestselling author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“Seductive and mesmerizing…You’ll feel like you’re in a fever dream as you read about an infamous cult of young women in 1960s Northern California.” Elle
“A mesmerizing and sympathetic portrait of teen girls.” People
“Captures a defining friendship in its full humanity with a touch of rock-memoir, tell-it-like-it-really-was attitude.” Vogue
“An astonishing work of imagination—remarkably atmospheric, preternaturally intelligent, and brutally feminist.” Boston Globe
“Seductive, luminous prose…captures the experience of crossing between adolescence and adulthood, questioning what we’re willing to do to belong and to be seen.” Barnes&Noble.com
The Girls is less about one night of violence than about the harm we can do, to ourselves and others, in our hunger for belonging and acceptance.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“A harrowing coming-of-age exploration…Beautifully written and unforgettable.” Library Journal (starred review)
“Narrator Cady McClain is extraordinary here, her diction perfect, her performance of every sentence thoughtful, unforced, yet hypervigilant…McClain remains invisible, but you never forget the jeopardy that underlies every scene as Evie drifts toward the unimaginable. Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award.” AudioFile
“A unique coming-of-age novel…The novel’s effectiveness comes through the powerful first-person narrative, which is so attuned to adolescent perceptions. Cline is spot on when it comes to describing adolescent awkwardness, the yearning to be accepted, sexual awakenings and confusion. She nails the era and the ’60s California vibe, describes the appeal of the cult and sucks readers in as easily as Evie is lured into the lives of the girls. Her realistic, articulate prose carries the book forward, mesmerizing readers with it’s seductive tone and leaving them knowing this will haunt their thoughts.” RT Book Reviews (4½ stars, Top Pick!)

Reviews

Reviews

by Bri 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Sleepy narration, sleepy story, skip the sleepiness.

I wanted to love this book, I really did, but I guess I'm not drinking the kool aid. As someone who is a little too fond of digging into the Wikipedia entries about tragedies, serial killers, and cults, I thought this fictionalized account of a young girl being in the outer ring of a loosely veiled Manson cult would be right up my alley, but no. The book fell flat for me, almost like it was trying too hard by not really trying at all. The audiobook narrator had a very sleepy vibe to her cadence, which a friend told me is also present in the text. While stylistically, this really fit with the vibe of one of the girls in the book (Suzanne), it didn't seem to fit with our rich teen protagonist who was playing at being ~disconnected from society~ and led to me being annoyed 80% of the time while listening. The publishing house is really trying to push this as a "can't miss summer 2016 read," but skip it and dive into something else.

Author

Author Bio: Emma Cline

Author Bio: Emma Cline

Emma Cline is from California. Her fiction has appeared in Tin House and the Paris Review, and she was the recipient of the Paris Review’s Plimpton Prize for Fiction in 2014.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Fiction
Runtime: 9.75
Audience: Adult
Language: English