The Gunning of America by Pamela Haag audiobook

The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture

By Pamela Haag
Read by Bernadette Dunne

Blackstone Publishing 9780465048953
16.47 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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Americans have always loved guns. This special bond was forged during the American Revolution and sanctified by the Second Amendment. It is because of this exceptional relationship that American civilians are more heavily armed than the citizens of any other nation. Or so we’re told. In The Gunning of America, historian Pamela Haag overturns this conventional wisdom. American gun culture, she argues, developed not because the gun was exceptional but precisely because it was not: guns proliferated in America because throughout most of the nation’s history they were perceived as an unexceptional commodity, no different than buttons or typewriters. Focusing on the history of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, one of the most iconic arms manufacturers in America, Haag challenges many basic assumptions of how and when America became a gun culture. Under the leadership of Oliver Winchester and his heirs, the company used aggressive, sometimes ingenious, sales and marketing techniques to create new markets for their product. Guns have never “sold themselves”; rather, through advertising and innovative distribution campaigns, the gun industry did. Through the meticulous examination of gun-industry archives, Haag challenges the myth of a primal bond between Americans and their firearms. Over the course of its 150-year history, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company sold over eight million guns. But Oliver Winchester—a shirtmaker in his previous career—had no apparent qualms about a life spent arming America. His daughter-in-law Sarah Winchester was a different story. Legend holds that Sarah was haunted by what she considered a vast blood fortune, and became convinced that the ghosts of rifle victims were haunting her. In this provocative and deeply researched work of narrative history, Haag fundamentally revises the history of arms in America and, in so doing, explodes the clichés that have created and sustained our lethal gun culture.

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Summary

Summary

A Kirkus Reviews Pick of the Best Nonfiction of 2016

Americans have always loved guns. This special bond was forged during the American Revolution and sanctified by the Second Amendment. It is because of this exceptional relationship that American civilians are more heavily armed than the citizens of any other nation. Or so we’re told.

In The Gunning of America, historian Pamela Haag overturns this conventional wisdom. American gun culture, she argues, developed not because the gun was exceptional but precisely because it was not: guns proliferated in America because throughout most of the nation’s history they were perceived as an unexceptional commodity, no different than buttons or typewriters.

Focusing on the history of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, one of the most iconic arms manufacturers in America, Haag challenges many basic assumptions of how and when America became a gun culture. Under the leadership of Oliver Winchester and his heirs, the company used aggressive, sometimes ingenious, sales and marketing techniques to create new markets for their product. Guns have never “sold themselves”; rather, through advertising and innovative distribution campaigns, the gun industry did. Through the meticulous examination of gun-industry archives, Haag challenges the myth of a primal bond between Americans and their firearms.

Over the course of its 150-year history, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company sold over eight million guns. But Oliver Winchester—a shirtmaker in his previous career—had no apparent qualms about a life spent arming America. His daughter-in-law Sarah Winchester was a different story. Legend holds that Sarah was haunted by what she considered a vast blood fortune, and became convinced that the ghosts of rifle victims were haunting her.

In this provocative and deeply researched work of narrative history, Haag fundamentally revises the history of arms in America and, in so doing, explodes the clichés that have created and sustained our lethal gun culture.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“In this fascinating account, Haag traces the history of America’s gun-making business…Both convincingly argued and eminently readable, Haag’s book will intrigue readers on all sides of the gun control debate.” Publishers Weekly (starred review)
“This important book speaks directly to the ideas that underpin the strident political debate on guns today. It will appeal to anyone interested in American history, business history, or modern politics.” Library Journal (starred review)
“Haag, an award-winning historian and essayist, has turned a wide and deep lens to America’s gun culture…The author has smoothly brought together a huge amount of archival research, wide historical sources, and contemporary perspectives as recent as 2015. This book should attract many readers.” Booklist
“A refreshingly unusual approach by an author admirably transparent about why she wrote the book and why she chose to avoid more traditional approaches.” Kirkus Reviews
“Pamela Haag has written a very smart book, deeply researched, original, provocative. The compelling narrative makes a powerful argument about the origins of America’s gun culture.” John Mack Faragher, Howard R. Lamar Professor of History, Yale University
“Firearms may be instruments of death. But they are also, as Pamela Haag reveals in her thought-provoking reassessment of guns in American life, economic commodities—so much so, that it can be difficult at times to discern where business culture ends and gun culture begins.” Karl Jacoby, author of Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History
“An exceptional, fresh perspective about the gun culture in America. Pamela Haag thoroughly examines the history of America’s long-term relationship with guns while offering an insightful, informative philosophy as to when and how this love affair began.” Wes Moore, founder and CEO of BridgeEdU

Reviews

Reviews

by ShortNFuzzy 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

totally non biased well researched and performed!

Looking for opinions on gun culture? Look elsewhere. Looking for facts on the history of the gun BUSINESS? This is the book for you! The influence of firearm economics turns out to be WAY more important that you think. Never seeming dry this book was eye opening and well thought out...BANG!

Author

Author Bio: Pamela Haag

Author Bio: Pamela Haag

Pamela Haag holds a PhD in history from Yale University and has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, a Mellon Fellowship, and post­doctoral awards from Brown and Rutgers universities. She lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD, MP3 CD
Category: Nonfiction/History
Runtime: 16.47
Audience: Adult
Language: English