Thomas Murphy by Roger Rosenblatt audiobook

Thomas Murphy: A Novel

By Roger Rosenblatt
Read by Gerard Doyle

Brilliance Audio 9780062394569
6.20 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781511356824

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    ISBN: 9781511356862

The acclaimed, award-winning essayist and memoirist returns to fiction with this reflective, bittersweet tale that introduces the irrepressible aging poet Thomas Murphy—a paean to the mystery, tragedy, and wonder of life. Trying his best to weasel out of an appointment with the neurologist his only child, Máire, has cornered him into, the poet Thomas Murphy—singer of the oldies, friend of the down-and-out, card sharp, raconteur, piano bar player, bon vivant, tough and honest and all-around good guy—contemplates his sunset years. Máire worries that Murph is losing his memory. Murph wonders what to do with the rest of his life. The older mind is at issue, and Murph’s jumps from fact to memory to fancy, conjuring the islands that have shaped him—Irishmaan, a rocky gumdrop off the Irish coast where he was born, and New York, his longtime home. He muses on the living, his daughter and precocious grandson William, and on the dead, his dear wife Oona, and Greenberg, his best friend. Now, into Murphy’s world comes the lovely Sarah, a blind woman less than half his age, who sees into his heart, as he sees into hers. Brought together under the most unlikely circumstance, Murph and Sarah begin in friendship and wind up in impossible possible love. An Irishman, a dreamer, a poet, Murph, like Whitman, sings lustily of himself and of everyone. Through his often extravagant behavior and observations, both hilarious and profound, we see the world in all its strange glory, equally beautiful and ridiculous. With memory at the center of his thoughts, he contemplates its power and accuracy and meaning. Our life begins in dreams, but does not stay with them, Murph reminds us. What use shall we make of the past? Ultimately, he asks, are relationships our noblest reason for living? Behold the charming, wistful, vibrant, aging Thomas Murphy, whose story celebrates the ageless confusion that is this dreadful, gorgeous life.

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Summary

Summary

A USA Today Pick for New and Notable Books

The acclaimed, award-winning essayist and memoirist returns to fiction with this reflective, bittersweet tale that introduces the irrepressible aging poet Thomas Murphy—a paean to the mystery, tragedy, and wonder of life.

Trying his best to weasel out of an appointment with the neurologist his only child, Máire, has cornered him into, the poet Thomas Murphy—singer of the oldies, friend of the down-and-out, card sharp, raconteur, piano bar player, bon vivant, tough and honest and all-around good guy—contemplates his sunset years. Máire worries that Murph is losing his memory. Murph wonders what to do with the rest of his life. The older mind is at issue, and Murph’s jumps from fact to memory to fancy, conjuring the islands that have shaped him—Irishmaan, a rocky gumdrop off the Irish coast where he was born, and New York, his longtime home. He muses on the living, his daughter and precocious grandson William, and on the dead, his dear wife Oona, and Greenberg, his best friend. Now, into Murphy’s world comes the lovely Sarah, a blind woman less than half his age, who sees into his heart, as he sees into hers. Brought together under the most unlikely circumstance, Murph and Sarah begin in friendship and wind up in impossible possible love.

An Irishman, a dreamer, a poet, Murph, like Whitman, sings lustily of himself and of everyone. Through his often extravagant behavior and observations, both hilarious and profound, we see the world in all its strange glory, equally beautiful and ridiculous. With memory at the center of his thoughts, he contemplates its power and accuracy and meaning. Our life begins in dreams, but does not stay with them, Murph reminds us. What use shall we make of the past? Ultimately, he asks, are relationships our noblest reason for living?

Behold the charming, wistful, vibrant, aging Thomas Murphy, whose story celebrates the ageless confusion that is this dreadful, gorgeous life.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“In this superb, slim novel, Rosenblatt delivers shrewd and funny observations about always going ‘full tilt,’ no matter what life throws at you as you age.” People
“Even when the poems aren’t coming, Murphy is a delight to listen to.” Wall Street Journal
“Rosenblatt’s accomplishment is to draw the reader so completely into Murphy’s mind and heart and memory, so thoroughly into the poet’s amused (and sometimes bemused) consciousness.” New York Times Book Review
“A joyous ode to language as it gropes to give voice to the ineffable.” Newsday
“This is the sort of novel you mark up with pleasurable abandon, so that you can read passages aloud later to someone else.” East Hampton Star (New York)
“Gerard Doyle’s Irish brogue is the perfect voice for Murphy as he rambles in a meandering journey from past to present to future and back again. Listeners are advised to engage in active listening or risk getting tangled in Murphy’s threads of memory, wistfulness, and regret. It’s worth the effort. You will chuckle at the clever wordplay, nod in agreement at the insights, and leave the story believing that Doyle is Murphy, a dreamer and poet you’d like to know better, who savors life even as he mourns losses and diminished capacities.” AudioFile

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Roger Rosenblatt

Author Bio: Roger Rosenblatt

Roger Rosenblatt’s essays for Time magazine and PBS have won two George Polk Awards, a Peabody, and an Emmy. He is the author of six Off-Broadway plays and thirteen books, including the national bestseller Rules for Aging and Children of War, which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. He has written two satirical novels, Beet and Lapham Rising, also a national bestseller. In 2008 he was appointed a distinguished professor of English and writing at Stony Brook University.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, CD
Category: Fiction/Literary
Runtime: 6.20
Audience: Adult
Language: English