Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous

By George Berkeley
Read by Ray Childs

4.61 Hours 09/07/2016 unabridged
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    ISBN: 9781518935114

Berkeley uses the Socratic mode of inquiry in Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous to question fundamental beliefs about knowledge and reality. These dialogues are between Hylas (whose name is derived from the ancient Greek word for matter) and Philonous, whose name means “lover of mind”. The new physical sciences developed in the 17th century supported the materialism proposed by Thomas Hobbes and several other philosophers. This worldview proclaimed that all of reality consists of nothing but matter in motion, thus promoting atheism and ethical skepticism. The implications for politics, ethics, and religion caused concern among leading intellectuals in the 18th century. Whatever the value of the positive claims presented in this work, Berkeley foreshadows the philosophical impact of 20th-century physics, which challenges the foundations of such materialism and calls for a better understanding of both the physical and the mental aspects of reality. © Agora Publications

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Summary

Summary

Berkeley uses the Socratic mode of inquiry in Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous to question fundamental beliefs about knowledge and reality. These dialogues are between Hylas (whose name is derived from the ancient Greek word for matter) and Philonous, whose name means “lover of mind”.

The new physical sciences developed in the 17th century supported the materialism proposed by Thomas Hobbes and several other philosophers. This worldview proclaimed that all of reality consists of nothing but matter in motion, thus promoting atheism and ethical skepticism. The implications for politics, ethics, and religion caused concern among leading intellectuals in the 18th century.

Whatever the value of the positive claims presented in this work, Berkeley foreshadows the philosophical impact of 20th-century physics, which challenges the foundations of such materialism and calls for a better understanding of both the physical and the mental aspects of reality.

© Agora Publications

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Author

Author Bio: George Berkeley

George Berkeley (1685–1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley, was one of the three great British empiricist philosophers. Born near Thomastown, Ireland, he was educated at Kilkenny College and attended Trinity College in Dublin, where he remained as a tutor and lecturer after the completion of his master’s degree in 1707. In 1734 he was appointed Bishop of Cloyne in Ireland. He is best known for his doctrine of immaterialism, the idea that reality has no material existence outside of the mind. Berkeley’s major works include An Essay towards a New Theory of Vision, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, and Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download
Category: Nonfiction/Philosophy
Runtime: 4.61
Audience: Adult
Language: English