Trailblazer by Dorothy Butler Gilliam audiobook

Trailblazer: A Pioneering Journalist’s Fight to Make the Media Look More like America

By Dorothy Butler Gilliam
Read by January LaVoy

Center Street, Hachette Book Group 9781546083443
8.98 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781549171352

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    ISBN: 9781549149832

Dorothy Butler Gilliam, whose 50-year-career as a journalist put her in the forefront of the fight for social justice, offers a comprehensive view of racial relations and the media in the U.S. Most civil rights victories are achieved behind the scenes, and this riveting, beautifully written memoir by a "black first" looks back with searing insight on the decades of struggle, friendship, courage, humor and savvy that secured what seems commonplace today-people of color working in mainstream media. Told with a pioneering newspaper writer's charm and skill, Gilliam's full, fascinating life weaves her personal and professional experiences and media history into an engrossing tapestry. When we read about the death of her father and other formative events of her life, we glimpse the crippling impact of the segregated South before the civil rights movement when slavery's legacy still felt astonishingly close. We root for her as a wife, mother, and ambitious professional as she seizes once-in-a-lifetime opportunities never meant for a "dark-skinned woman" and builds a distinguished career. We gain a comprehensive view of how the media, especially newspapers, affected the movement for equal rights in this country. And in this humble, moving memoir, we see how an innovative and respected journalist and working mother helped provide opportunities for others. With the distinct voice of one who has worked for and witnessed immense progress and overcome heart-wrenching setbacks, this book covers a wide swath of media history -- from the era of game-changing Negro newspapers like the Chicago Defender to the civil rights movement, feminism, and our current imperfect diversity. This timely memoir, which reflects the tradition of boot-strapping African American storytelling from the South, is a smart, contemporary consideration of the media.

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Summary

Summary

A 2019 Audiofile Magazine “Best of the Year” Audiobook

Winner of an AudioFile Earphones Award



Dorothy Butler Gilliam, whose 50-year-career as a journalist put her in the forefront of the fight for social justice, offers a comprehensive view of racial relations and the media in the U.S.


Most civil rights victories are achieved behind the scenes, and this riveting, beautifully written memoir by a "black first" looks back with searing insight on the decades of struggle, friendship, courage, humor and savvy that secured what seems commonplace today-people of color working in mainstream media.


Told with a pioneering newspaper writer's charm and skill, Gilliam's full, fascinating life weaves her personal and professional experiences and media history into an engrossing tapestry. When we read about the death of her father and other formative events of her life, we glimpse the crippling impact of the segregated South before the civil rights movement when slavery's legacy still felt astonishingly close. We root for her as a wife, mother, and ambitious professional as she seizes once-in-a-lifetime opportunities never meant for a "dark-skinned woman" and builds a distinguished career. We gain a comprehensive view of how the media, especially newspapers, affected the movement for equal rights in this country. And in this humble, moving memoir, we see how an innovative and respected journalist and working mother helped provide opportunities for others.


With the distinct voice of one who has worked for and witnessed immense progress and overcome heart-wrenching setbacks, this book covers a wide swath of media history -- from the era of game-changing Negro newspapers like the Chicago Defender to the civil rights movement, feminism, and our current imperfect diversity. This timely memoir, which reflects the tradition of boot-strapping African American storytelling from the South, is a smart, contemporary consideration of the media.

Editorial Reviews

Editorial Reviews

“In her more than six decades at the centers of journalism in New York and Washington, she has often been the first African American woman and the best of everything. Her memoir shows us that a few can be both, but no one should have to. We will have no democracy until each of us can be our unique individual selves.” Gloria Steinem, #1 New York Times bestselling author and co-founder of Ms. magazine
“Dorothy Gilliam is a great reporter, a pioneer for all women in the news business, and African-American women particularly. Her story is about a time in American journalism where courage and brilliance were called for in the white-male bastions that were American newsrooms. It’s a story that has been waiting a long time to be told.” Carl Bernstein, Pulitzer Prize–winner and #1 New York Times bestselling author
“Using an understated conversational style, narrator January LaVoy performs journalist Gilliam’s memoir…LaVoy’s soft, clear voice narrows the space between listener and author, and her fluid, expressive delivery expertly conveys Gilliam’s emotions…Winner of the AudioFile Earphones Award.” AudioFile
“In her compelling memoir, she recounts her trailblazing career during the turbulence of the Vietnam War, the civil rights and women’s movements, and Watergate and looks beyond her personal journey to examine efforts to diversify the staffs of news organizations and other challenges currently facing the press.” Booklist (starred review)

Reviews

Reviews

Author

Author Bio: Dorothy Butler Gilliam

Author Bio: Dorothy Butler Gilliam

Dorothy Butler Gilliam has been a pioneering journalist and change-maker for more than five decades. She started in the black press in the 1950s, working in Louisville, Kentucky; Memphis; and Chicago. In 1961, she became the first black woman reporter for the Washington Post. She went on to become an editor and a columnist for the newspaper before retiring in 2003. Throughout her career, she worked tirelessly to nurture other journalists of color and to diversify newsrooms across the United States. She lives in Washington, DC.

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Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, CD
Category: Nonfiction/Biography
Runtime: 8.98
Audience: Adult
Language: English