Uneasy Money by P. G. Wodehouse audiobook

Uneasy Money

By P. G. Wodehouse
Read by Nigel Lambert

Blackstone Publishing
7.42 Hours Unabridged
Format: Digital Download (In Stock)
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    ISBN: 9781482980165

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    ISBN: 9781482150902

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These are strange times for the English aristocracy. When hard-up William Fitz William Delamere Chalmers, Lord Dawlish—otherwise known as Bill—sets off for America to make a fortune, he does not expect to be left one by an American millionaire with whom he strikes up a passing acquaintance. Honor demands that Bill Dawlish should restore this unexpected windfall to the rightful heirs, but this involves him in complicated adventures with greedy relations, haughty dowagers, dogs, chickens and an angry monkey. Calm is eventually restored but not before Bill has met the woman of his dreams and married her in the church on Fifth Avenue.

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Summary

Summary

These are strange times for the English aristocracy. When hard-up William Fitz William Delamere Chalmers, Lord Dawlish—otherwise known as Bill—sets off for America to make a fortune, he does not expect to be left one by an American millionaire with whom he strikes up a passing acquaintance.

Honor demands that Bill Dawlish should restore this unexpected windfall to the rightful heirs, but this involves him in complicated adventures with greedy relations, haughty dowagers, dogs, chickens and an angry monkey. Calm is eventually restored but not before Bill has met the woman of his dreams and married her in the church on Fifth Avenue.

Reviews

Reviews

by Bertie Wooster 9/13/2017
Overall Performance
Narration
Story

Superb. Just Watch Out for Chapter 22

If you’re at all familiar with P. G. Wodehouse’s golf sagas, then you’re aware that many of his characters “in peril on the tee” are there because of a singular inability to “keep ‘em straight”. In the same way, Bertie Wooster speaks pretty bitterly of his attempts to set Augustus (“Gussie”) Finknottle’s love life straight. Try as he might, Gussie always seems to skid off in the opposite direction from that in which Bertie intended him to go. And, sadly, every so often the author in whose brain these characters first took shape also skids off the tracks. It doesn’t happen often, but that only makes it more disappointing when it does.

In this case the trouble spot is Chapter 22. The idea the heroine is trying to convey to the hero is simple enough. It’s so simple, in fact, that I caught it in mid air, even before the first bounce. But our heroine goes on.

And on.

And on.

And on.

It is a painful performance due, I darkly suspect, to some clause in the contract that committed Wodehouse to so many words, even if his story didn’t require them.

Uneasy Money certainly didn’t need most of the words in Chapter 22. In fact, the rest of the book (Chapters 1 through 21 and 23 through 25) is up to the usual high Wodehouse standard. This novel comes early (1917), right at the dawn of the Master’s mature style (if you can call a style mature that features people like S. F. Ukeridge, Monty Bodkin and Bingo Little) but it has all the qualities that make that style so delightful. So, in spite of Chapter 22 I still give Uneasy Money a full five stars all round. Nonetheless, I felt compelled to warn you about that misbegotten chapter. Otherwise, lulled by the promise behind all those stars, you might have suspected me of leading you down the garden path, only to step on the teeth of a rake and feel the full force of the handle on your nose and forehead. A whole different kind of stars you’d see then, and I wouldn’t want that.

Another bit of goose here is our narrator, Nigel Lambert. He has an infectious way of making even the simplest expository sentence interesting. The rest of the time he’s just having a lot of good, clean fun with the toy box of characters and situations Wodehouse has built for him.

Author

Author Bio: P. G. Wodehouse

Author Bio: P. G. Wodehouse

Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (1881–1975) was an English humorist who wrote novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics, and numerous pieces of journalism. He was highly popular throughout a career that lasted more than seventy years, and his many writings continue to be widely read. He is best known for his novels and short stories of Bertie Wooster and his manservant Jeeves and for his settings of English upper-class society of the pre– and post–World War I era. He lived in several countries before settling in the United States after World War II. During the 1920s, he collaborated with Broadway legends like Cole Porter and George Gershwin on musicals and, in the 1930s, expanded his repertoire by writing for motion pictures. He was honored with a knighthood in 1975.

Details

Details

Available Formats : Digital Download, Digital Rental, CD
Category: Fiction/Humor
Runtime: 7.42
Audience: Adult
Language: English